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"pyqt5 - learning qt for python", it's about cross-platform UI building using python, "body language", about advanced rigging for production, and "Maya APIs - from UI design to vector math for rigging". 

Quite interesting readings, although the holidays got in the way and had to stand them by 😅

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We've got topics on music and video, but not on reading. So... what are folks reading. List your item, a brief bit on it, and put it into a category such as 'history', 'political science', '

A loving new reissue describing clearly the unity of art, spirit, thought, color, sight, and sensory experience.

A rhyme I wrote about Zeus when I was 14 or 15 (41 years ago): Zeus was a pretty loose dude The other gods said he was rude So he sent down some thunder  Which threw them asunder

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Nearly finished this...utterly INCREDIBLE 

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On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of north-east Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than 18,500 people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned.

It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. It set off a national crisis, and the meltdown of a nuclear power plant. And even after the immediate emergency had abated, the trauma of the disaster continued to express itself in bizarre and mysterious ways.

Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo, and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. There he encountered stories of ghosts and hauntings. He met a priest who performed exorcisms on people possessed by the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village which had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own.

What really happened to the local children as they waited in the school playground in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up?

Ghosts of the Tsunami is a classic of literary non-fiction, a heart-breaking and intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the personal accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the bleak struggle to find consolation in the ruins.

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Just finished reading Tiny Beautiful Things. Non Fiction Self help? Words of wisdom, advice, found it on somebody's best of 2020 list (can't remember whose) and I was surprised and delighted by it. 

Before that I binged on the Amelia Peabody series  Historical Fiction Action/adventure/comedy about famous Egyptologist/Amatuer detective/Victorian feminist and her equally remarkable family. I read these long ago as they came out but sometimes years would go by between books so now I've had the pleasure of reading them all at once all the way through.

I'm now doing the same thing with the Lord Peter Wimsey   Fiction mystery/detective  I'm on the library wait list for some of them.  It's been long ago enough that I can't remember the endings so that's a plus. I've discovered that having memory issues is one of the few pleasures of aging.   I get to re-discover all kinds of great books and movies.  

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On 9/25/2020 at 6:26 PM, Lindal Kidd said:

The Evening and the Morning, a new book in the "Kingsbridge" series by Ken Follett.

In most cases, I recommend reading series in internal chronological order, but in this case I think you should read the first one written, "The Pillars of the Earth".  The Evening and the Morning is a prequel, set about 200 years before Pillars.

Loved Pillars and the sequels, I'm on the wait list for this one.

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23 hours ago, Jordan Whitt said:

I'm back in my thriller phase of book reading.

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ads this one to my reading list, well, actually I'm gonna start at the first one and see how I like it

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45 minutes ago, kali Wylder said:

ads this one to my reading list, well, actually I'm gonna start at the first one and see how I like it

I hope you enjoy reading this series as much as I have been!

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Tchaikovsky: A Biography

by Anthony Holder

 

Uncanny Valley: A Memoir

By Anna Wiener

 

Even studying music myself and playing music instruments, I had no idea what went into writing musical scores, amazing! Such a sad story of how Tchaikovsky lived in fear that his homosexuality would be revealed publicly, though his inner circle knew, and this may have led to his death -- it's not clear if he committed suicide.

 

Meanwhile, I have known exactly what goes into these start-ups, having seen it up close at many tech fairs and of course from the inside in SL, and let me say, it's not symphonic.

 

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I'm currently reading The Fullness of Everything by Patricia Powell.  A novel about a guy who had a rough childhood in Jamaica, cuts his dysfunctional family out of his life, and tries to live a normal adulthood in another country.

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I'm starting to feel like my taste in reading material runs more towards the trashy than the more high brow stuff the rest of the posters seem to read.

Today's offering...just started The Keeper series.

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   Consumed my new books from Christmas before I even went back home, so I'm bookless at the moment. I do have a fair few books in the workshop that I'm supposed to repair and/or rebind, but it's mostly utter trash - a biography of William Booth, for example, how fun is that?

   In addition to the books I received as Christmas gifts, I also had a go at some of the stuff in my family's bookshelves; a novel collection of H.P. Lovecraft, Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne, Matilda by Roald Dahl (it was in the bookshelf next to my bed and I couldn't sleep, and it's a nice book that I loved as a kid!), and The Children of Húrin by J.R.R. Tolkien (which I really loved, so dark!).

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My husband and I have been reading Anna Karenina together. This is my fourth time reading it and his first. This isn't usually his genre of book, but we take turns choosing a book to read at the same time. It was my turn to choose.

The one thing that always seems so compelling to me about Anna Karenina is how enthralled I become in the story every time I have restarted the book. I always find something new in the story I hadn't noticed before. My perspective has also changed and seemingly evolved each time I reread it. I've reread it over the span of almost twenty years. It has been a rewarding experience because as I've evolved, my perception of the story and characters have as well. It has been fascinating. 

It really still is one of my favorite books of all time. I think it always will be. I've really enjoyed the discussions my husband and I have had about it. Fresh perspective is always fun. It really is worth a read.At least in my humble opinion.

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On 1/11/2021 at 6:22 PM, Dafadilia Wayfarer said:

It really still is one of my favorite books of all time. I think it always will be. 

My favourite book of all time!  It was given to me by my grandmother when I was about 14 and I fell in love with it and tend to reread it at least every couple of years.  It took me a while to find a downloadable version so I can read it on my tablet...but I did and now I am in my  happy place and about to start reading it for about the 100th time!

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