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8 hours ago, Dano Seale said:

"As someone already voluntarily self isolating with an overnight job babysitting an empty building,...."

Yes you are!  😐

The job came before the virus. Happy coincidence.

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Just now, Gadget Portal said:

The job came before the virus. Happy coincidence.

Ahh a fellow night worker!. Hi, I babysit a building also 😅

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

You were able to understand that "FDA approval" does not (and could not, because of the slow FDA process that Trump has lambasted) mean "approval for Coronavirus" but the President of the United States could easily be confused?

That's precisely my point.

Okay, I've heard more about this.  What seems to be missing is the President said something about the FDA and approval.   However, what I'm hearing word of now is that there is FDA approval of a clinical trial of the anti-malarial drug and the antibiotic - these drugs being Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin.  Somehow, the clinical trial part seemed to be missing, at least according to the BBC article.  

So, the President was right...there is FDA approval of a clinical trial of these two drugs to treat coronavirus.   

The anti-malarial drug Hydroxychloroquine seems to keep the viral cells from binding.  

The antibiotic Azithromycin seems to be working on secondary pneumonia.  

The President of the United States and his administration need to give a formal State of the Union address.

 

 

Edited by FairreLilette
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I confess I am scared - as one of the 'older, immune-compromised' population at greater risk, I feel very vulnerable.

More, though, I am frustrated at being house-bound and reflecting on all the things I can't do  - I actually wasn't doing many of them before, but now I can't, and it seems worse somehow that all those opportunities were wasted. If I am spared I will do all I can to try to reach my full potential - I promise...(Although I suspect I will slide back into my old inertia...)

Looking for good quotes about death I found: 


"I feel monotony and death to be almost the same."

Charlotte Brontë

Although, perhaps, Woody Allen's "I'm not afraid of dying, I just don't want to be there when it happens." is more appropriate.

 

I found reading Daniel Defoe's Diary of a Plague Year to be somewhat cheering in a macabre way. Likewise Connie Willis' Domesday Book. 

I am lucky, we have enough toilet paper for at least a month, I have SL, and the newest Animal Crossing. 

I find comfort in reading the comments on the forums, and knowing I'm not alone.

 

 

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51 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

Somehow, the clinical trial part seemed to be missing, at least according to the BBC article.  

You realize you can watch his press conferences yourself, right? Though I think you'd do far better to forget about him all together and watch Gov. Newsom and Mayor Garcetti instead. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, FairreLilette said:

So, the President was right...there is FDA approval of a clinical trial of these two drugs to treat coronavirus.   

Which is not FDA approval of the drug for use to treat coronavirus. This is much like Trump's claims several weeks ago that vaccines would be available in as little as 3-4 months. He had to be corrected (by Fauci again, I think) who explained that the clinical trials might begin in as little as 3-4 months, but that vaccines are 12-18 months away.

If this is a matter of Trump not understanding the difference between approval of the drug at the end of the trial period, and approval of the start of trials, he's had plenty of time to have it drilled into his noggin by staff. The fact that's not happened means the noggin is too hard or the drills are too soft.

ETA: Meanwhile, there are other mitigations that might work shorter term, including convalescent sera, which extracts antibodies from those who have cleared the virus from their systems and injects them into those most at risk. It doesn't work after an infection is established, because there is only a limited supply of injected antibodies, but prophylactically or very early in an infection, there may be enough antibodies to shut the virus down.

Because this method has been used in the past, and is fairly well understood, it may be possible to field it in advance of the availability of vaccines. There are some risks, but those are also fairly well understood.

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
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On 3/20/2020 at 7:55 PM, ItHadToComeToThis said:

Nope. Not at all scared, if you are talking about Covid19. I’m not in an at risk category and even then to put it in perspective. It currently has an 89% recovery rate. For most people it will be a mild infection. Plus the younger you are the less you have to worry about it. I really wouldn’t worry too much. Just do the basics, wash hands, stay away from vulnerable relatives and play SL. Whatever you do, don’t let yourself get hyped up by the media or the “I have it worse than you” crowd. If you are in an at risk category then self isolation is your friend. 

this kind of response is making me crazy.

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On 3/20/2020 at 6:04 PM, LittleMzChilliHead said:

I am terrified 😨 I don't want to die, or my nana 😭

Too down to go on SL...

Fear is normal.  Fear in proportion to the risk is healthy.  Unreasoned fear is dangerous.  Take control of you emotions and your situation, do not let them control you.

Unless you are in a high risk group, the chance of dying if you get it is about the same as a moderately dangerous hobby, such as sky diving.  You'll be fine.

If you are in a high risk group, and catch it, you still have a fairly low chance of death - roughly the same as surviving a moderate car accident while wearing your seat belt and your airbag working.  And, you have MANY things you can do to avoid the accident, or the virus.  Wash your hands frequently and stop licking things, for instance.

I'm more fearful for my mom (77, just got over cancer for the second time a year ago) and grandma (106).  All I (or you) can do is to keep away from them until this is over, and help make sure they are taking precautions.

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I don't think that I am overly afraid, but I am anxious because of all the unknowns and uncertainty. This is similar to the anxiety and lack of concentration that I've had that last two years when we had major fires (Tubbs fire and Kindcade fire) in our area, or the uncertainty during fire season of not knowing if your power will be turned off or not.  Apparently I am not good at dealing with issues for which there are no clear timeline or predictable behaviors about, yet heavily impact the area where I live.

One of the main uncertainties for me is not knowing how many may be walking around with the virus, but not showing major symptoms.  My county is only reporting 21 active cases at this moment (which is more than double last weekend) but they have only tested 400 people.  It appears that you have to be showing enough symptoms to convince your doctor to order the test, in order to get tested.  As testing is increased across the country, I expect numbers will quickly rise, but as long as minor cases are being told to "go home and act like you do have it" without being tested, the official numbers we see will always be lower than what is actually out in the communities.

My county went to a shelter in place state a few days before all of California was placed under that order.  My husband works for an essential business, so is still working, but only as long as enough customers continue to come in to make it profitable for the business to stay open.  The economic uncertainty not just for his place of employment, but also for both of my daughters and their families, my sister, as well as everyone else who is being impacted job wise in some way, is a big concern for me.

My husband and I are in our early sixties (62 for him, 60 for me) so their is some concern we are on the boundary of the age which makes the virus more severe.  We are following all suggested guidelines and taking the shelter in place order seriously, not just for ourselves, but for other vulnerable adults out in the community at large. I am no longer visiting in person  with my mom (who is 81 with a history of respiratory issues) but we do talk on the phone several times a day.  My husband's work is taking a lot of precautions, but I can tell he is concerned.  My normal week-day occupation is watching some combination of my four grandsons anywhere from 4 to 9 hours a day, depending on their parents work schedules.  Fortunately both of my daughters are taking the shelter in place order seriously, and they are keeping their kids at their houses until the order is lifted, and it seems that the major threat has passed.  There is one parent in each of their households who is working from home right now. Starting next week they will need to include remote schooling in their daily schedules - I can't express how relieved I am that I am not going to be expected to handle that.

I saw an interesting graph the other day (can't remember where) that the age group with the largest number of hospitalizations was the younger group (20's through mid-50's) though seniors do have the largest number of deaths.  It sounds like it may not always be "a piece of cake" even for the younger ones.  So I would encourage even those who think they're young enough to not have to be concerned, to be concerned just enough to follow whatever guidelines and restrictions may be in place where they live.

I found it interesting, that in just the small number of people who regularly post here in the forums, there are two - in different countries - who feel that they may have contracted the virus.

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1 hour ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

Which is not FDA approval of the drug for use to treat coronavirus. This is much like Trump's claims several weeks ago that vaccines would be available in as little as 3-4 months. He had to be corrected (by Fauci again, I think) who explained that the clinical trials might begin in as little as 3-4 months, but that vaccines are 12-18 months away.

If this is a matter of Trump not understanding the difference between approval of the drug at the end of the trial period, and approval of the start of trials, he's had plenty of time to have it drilled into his noggin by staff. The fact that's not happened means the noggin is too hard or the drills are too soft.

ETA: Meanwhile, there are other mitigations that might work shorter term, including convalescent sera, which extracts antibodies from those who have cleared the virus from their systems and injects them into those most at risk. It doesn't work after an infection is established, because there is only a limited supply of injected antibodies, but prophylactically or very early in an infection, there may be enough antibodies to shut the virus down.

Because this method has been used in the past, and is fairly well understood, it may be possible to field it in advance of the availability of vaccines. There are some risks, but those are also fairly well understood.

Thanks for posting the link.  That is how most "flus" are treated/prevented, isn't it?  With the sera which becomes a vaccine?  

However, I never said President Trump said the FDA gave approval for the drug as a treatment for coronavirus.  The BBC did, or that's how the BBC interpreted what the President said and I said I could not find an article where the President actually said that and you posted this link:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/donald-trump-derides-fdas-slow-and-burdensome-regulatory-process-for-new-drugs-213238477.html

This link above has nothing about the President saying the two drugs were approved by the FDA as a treatment for Coronavirus.  He touts the FDA for "moving mountains" but nothing further about the FDA in the above link.

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51 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

Thanks for posting the link.  That is how most "flus" are treated/prevented, isn't it?  With the sera which becomes a vaccine? 

True in spirit, but somewhat misses the mark.  With a vaccine, a non-dangerous form of the virus is introduced.  This causes the body to generate its own antibodies (as it would if the virus were the "real thing") but without going through the danger and discomfort of actually getting the disease.  "Non-dangerous" can take either of two forms.  The "killed virus" form is preferred, as there is less chance of unpleasant side effects.  "Live virus" vaccines use a weakened, but still active form of the virus.

By contrast, giving a person an infusion of blood plasma from a recovered victim lets them use that person's antibodies, rather than inducing their immune system to make its own.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, FairreLilette said:

Thanks for posting the link.  That is how most "flus" are treated/prevented, isn't it?  With the sera which becomes a vaccine?

No. Vaccines are created by killing or substantially weakening live viruses, then introducing them into the person to provoke an immune response. Then, should the person encounter a live virus, the immune system already has antibodies ready to go, and will continue to produce them until the virus is cleared, and perhaps maintain some level of resistance for an extended period thereafter, possibly forever.

In convalescent sera therapy, antibodies are transferred from one person to another. This gives the recipient a small storehouse of antibodies ready to fight the live virus, but no provocation to produce more. The recipient's immune system still hasn't seen the actual virus for the first time, and is therefore not actively producing defenses. If the transfused supply of antibodies can't keep the viral load low until a natural immune response develops, the patient will succumb.

Read this article...

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2020-03-10/millions-of-coronavirus-test-kits-available-soon-pence-says-as-us-cases-top-700

In it, Mike Pence stated, on Mar 10, that over a million COVID-19 test kits had already been distributed, and that another four million would be distributed before the end of the week, March 13. On March 15, Pence stated that drive/walk-through test sites would be set up this week, each capable of screening 2000-4000 people per day.

It's now March 21, eight days after he publicly claimed that five million test kits would be in the field and that we'd have dedicated test stations processing 2000-4000 test/day. Hospitals across the nation are still reporting they can't get enough test kits. My local news reported that my local hospital has very few kits, and must save them for only those individuals who's course of treatment would be altered by a diagnosis.

I challenge you to explain how more than 5 million test kits, in the field for more than eight days, still leave hospitals without them.

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
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The time to REALLY worry is if they tell all the trucker's to work at home, because it can't be done and without them 'society' collapses within a fortnight! (that's 2 weeks for Americans).
I hope when all this has blown over, the "thank you for your service" craze changes from the Military to the trucker's, who are the real heroes keeping the Country safe!

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

No. Vaccines are created by killing or substantially weakening live viruses, then introducing them into the person to provoke an immune response. Then, should the person encounter a live virus, the immune system already has antibodies ready to go, and will continue to produce them until the virus is cleared, and perhaps maintain some level of resistance for an extended period thereafter, possibly forever.

In convalescent sera therapy, antibodies are transferred from one person to another. This gives the recipient a small storehouse of antibodies ready to fight the live virus, but no provocation to produce more. The recipient's immune system still hasn't seen the actual virus for the first time, and is therefore not actively producing defenses. If the transfused supply of antibodies can't keep the viral load low until a natural immune response develops, the patient will succumb.

Read this article...

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2020-03-10/millions-of-coronavirus-test-kits-available-soon-pence-says-as-us-cases-top-700

In it, Mike Pence stated, on Mar 10, that over a million COVID-19 test kits had already been distributed, and that another four million would be distributed before the end of the week, March 13. On March 15, Pence stated that drive/walk-through test sites would be set up this week, each capable of screening 2000-4000 people per day.

It's now March 21, eight days after he publicly claimed that five million test kits would be in the field and that we'd have dedicated test stations processing 2000-4000 test/day. Hospitals across the nation are still reporting they can't get enough test kits. My local news reported that my local hospital has very few kits, and must save them for only those individuals who's course of treatment would be altered by a diagnosis.

I challenge you to explain how more than 5 million test kits, in the field for more than eight days, still leave hospitals without them.

Thanks again for the info.

And the current "news" now from my local governance of the state of California as of this evening, 3/21/20 is:  stay home if you are asymptomatic and don't go for a test.  The gowns, glove, masks currently available are needed to treat the symptomatic.  There simply aren't enough supplies to go around for everybody.

I need groceries frankly.  I am hoping I can go to the store soon.  My building is currently locked - can't go out, can't come in.

That's why I think a formal address is needed because I need food and other things.

Edited by FairreLilette

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25 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

My building is currently locked - can't go out, can't come in.

What kind of building are you living in where you are locked in? Is your landlord a prison warden?

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Posted (edited)
On 3/20/2020 at 7:04 PM, LittleMzChilliHead said:

I am terrified 😨 I don't want to die, or my nana 😭

Too down to go on SL...

Chilli, I'm not sure if you're still here or not, but I wanted to circle around and address you again directly, as this thread has rather wandered off track (as they tend to). I'm not sure that the choruses of "Hey, I'm not afraid!" are likely helping much, much less the even more distressing "Damn right, I'm terrified, and so should you be" responses.

In this kind of context, one really wants to just be reassuring. I want tell you that you shouldn't be afraid. But I think that would do you a disservice. At the same time, I don't want to feed into the personal panic than many of us -- including, frankly, me -- are beginning to feel.

The truth, I think, is that you are right to be at least a little afraid. It's okay to be scared. I'm scared, and I'm not in the high risk group, although I have many loved ones and close friends who are. Fear is not merely a natural reaction to a very real threat; it's a healthy one, a sort of internalized alarm system that should, where our information is correct and the threat real, help us cope.

But the flip side of this is that our fears should be founded upon a rational understanding of the threat, and they should never be so profound that they paralyze us.

So, again, it's ok to be afraid. In addition to the personal threat, we face a whole lot of unknowns going down the road. But keep that fear in perspective: acknowledge the threat -- so that you can act upon it, and exercise caution -- but also recognize that there is no foreordained "doom" facing any of us. We can, we will get through this. Humanity, even within living memory, has been through a lot worse, and despite isolated idiots and bad players, the vast majority of us are determined to get through it whole, and together.

You've not alone in being afraid, but. more importantly, you're not alone in caring. I care what happens to you, to me, to my friends and family, and to everyone here, that's one of the reasons why I am not going to spend this time petrified with fear, and unable to fight this thing. I'm going to do what I can to be personally careful, and to protect those I love, and to help in any way to ensure that this thing takes as few people from us as possible.

So, maybe, use your fear: it should be a tool, and not a disability. Use it to guide your actions constructively, to keep those you love safe, and use it to strengthen your determination to assist in whatever rational and safe ways you can, to help us all get through this safely.

So, please accept this virtual hug from me, someone who is also afraid. It's a consoling hug, a comforting hug. But it's also, I hope, a strengthening hug.

 

 

Edited by Scylla Rhiadra
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16 minutes ago, Beth Macbain said:

What kind of building are you living in where you are locked in? Is your landlord a prison warden?

She's foreign and I don't think she understands the deal here wherein I just read yes we can go out for the essentials.  I have been asking other residents here...do you know if we can go out for shopping and getting the "I don't know".  Shopping for food and other needs (grooming, etc) are essentials.  And, I cannot hardly understand her when she speaks in her broken English. 

Meanwhile, me and 110 other people approximately have been locked in here since the Governor of the State of California put us in lock-down by the Administrator/Owner of the building I live in.  

I have been searching for internet news since Thursday night.  I did finally find out that yes we can go out for essentials.  

But, it probably won't be til Monday or I will try the door tomorrow.  

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2 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

She's foreign and I don't think she understands the deal here wherein I just read yes we can go out for the essentials.  I have been asking other residents here...do you know if we can go out for shopping and getting the "I don't know".  Shopping for food and other needs (grooming, etc) are essentials.  And, I cannot hardly understand her when she speaks in her broken English. 

Meanwhile, me and 110 other people approximately have been locked in here since the Governor of the State of California put us in lock-down by the Administrator/Owner of the building I live in.  

I have been searching for internet news since Thursday night.  I did finally find out that yes we can go out for essentials.  

But, it probably won't be til Monday or I will try the door tomorrow.  

If this woman seriously has you all locked inside, I would call the police. Immediately. What happens if there is a fire?

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Good grief.  You could call the police, Fairre, and have them explain to the building owner that "lock down" does not mean "lock the doors."

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, Beth Macbain said:

If this woman seriously has you all locked inside, I would call the police. Immediately. What happens if there is a fire?

Oh my gaaaaaaaah, I can't hardly believe she lead us to believe it was actual "lock-down" and took it literally.   

There is a night guard here who has a key.  I am waiting for them to come on duty soon so I can speak to them.

There are other residents here too who believe we are locked in and cannot go anywhere.  

I will let the ones I've talked to already know more of what's going on...such as, we can go out for essentials and she had no right to lock us in.

Edited by FairreLilette
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10 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

Oh my gaaaaaaaah, I can't hardly believe she lead us to believe it was actual "lock-down" and took it literally.   

There is a night guard here who has a key.  I am waiting for them to come on duty soon so I can speak to them.

There are other residents here too who believe we are locked in and cannot go anywhere.  

I will let the ones I've talked to already know more of what's going on...such as, we can go out for essentials and she had no right to lock us in.

Evidently none of the residents have televisions or radios or internet.

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Be sure you know what is "essential".  Food is essential.  Medicine is essential.  If you work in an area deemed critical, your work is essential.  Grooming is not essential.  Touching up your coiffure or your manicure can wait!

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5 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

Evidently none of the residents have televisions or radios or internet.

No, that's actually not true.  Most have TV's; only a few have internet due to no cable in the building, only wifi...most don't want wifi except a few of us. 

A person I am on friendly terms with here when I asked when can we go shopping etc...and how long is the lock-down; told me "months" and his friend in Kern county was currently locked in her own private house.

Misinformation has taken a strong-hold here. 

I've been looking for the actual protocol of this since Thursday night on the internet.  I did not come across any "exacts" of what was involved.

I am informed now.

Understanding my Landlord's English is a near impossibility.  She is Russian...it's a very pronounced accent and she put us in actual "lock-down".  No going out; no one coming in.  

I will keep my outings to a minimum of essentials.  Am I furious with her.  Oh yes.  

 

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