Jump to content

Are You Showing Support for Black Lives Matter in Second Life?


You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 94 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, Beth Macbain said:

I'm going to make a controversial confession here. I don't love French fries. What I do love is the huge variety of toppings and sauces. The fries are simply a delivery method for those delicious things.

Same for lettuce in a salad. 

Le Tater is one of my food groups.

i could do an entire Benjamin Buford Blue (Bubba) ūüć§ shrimp list ¬†line for potatoes.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 2.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Not as such, no. We don't really have that kind of thing here as, well, our law enforcement seldom gun down people - and whilst I obviously do not condone of it, I'm hesitant to give my 'official' (i.

Alrighty, now that I've gone ahead and cleared out some not so pleasant posts from this thread I wanted to drop a quick note here. As many of you have seen me say several times before, delving in

Thank you for this.   Black woman here.  Of A Certain Age.  I have my BLM shirt.   For whatever that means. (freewheeling it here, went from wanting to say something to not wanting to say anythi

Posted Images

Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Beth Macbain said:

I'm going to make a controversial confession here. I don't love French fries. What I do love is the huge variety of toppings and sauces. The fries are simply a delivery method for those delicious things.

Same for lettuce in a salad. 

oh & cause I forgot- Growing up every night we had to have iceberg lettuce with this gross vinegar Miracle whip dressing my step mom would make. Every single night. Was one of those things I told myself when I became an adult I’d never eat again.
 

So I have always bought spinach for my salads, and brown eggs because my step mom got mad at me once for buying them instead of white eggs, and I’ll never eat another salmon patty either. There was about a three month stretch where we had salmon patties (the gross nasty slimey salmon from the can) Every single day. I was picking fish bones out of my teeth for days after it ended.

Edited by Pixie Kobichenko
  • Haha 1
  • Sad 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Thank god the only one around to see it at the moment is my dog.

Dog?  DOG???!!!!!

/me saunters over to box and kicks litter n stuff all over the floor. Stopping dramatically. Gives one more big  kick and stuff flying. Strolls off and tips over water bowl.

  • Haha 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just some of my thoughts today...

I spent quite a while yesterday listening to some of the  black perspectives on the recent events.  In an interview I watched  with Kareem Abdul Jabbar he said that racism is like dust in the air.  When asked to explain that analogy, he said that we generally only see the dust motes in the air when a light is shined on them, but that they are still there whether we can see them or not.  I think this particularly applies to many white Americans - the experience that many people of color experience all of their lives is so foreign from our white experience than many of us only see the racism when a light is shined on it - like the George Floyd killing did.   

In talking about this with my husband, he recalled a young black man he used to work with - very nice guy, good worker, married with a little boy.  Somedays at work he would be a bit melancholy, my husband would ask him if anything was the matter, and he'd talk about how it happened again - driving home from work and being pulled over by the police - for no apparent reason - he never received a traffic ticket or a traffic warning from any of the stops.  This was just one of the things that happened often (sometimes several times a week) to him and other people of color, but something that had never happened to my husband or most other white people that we know.

Trevor Noah had talked several years ago about New York City's "stop and frisk" policy.  Another thing that many white people had a hard time comprehending the validity of complaints about,  because it is not a common experience for us - to be randomly stopped and frisked when we're walking down the street in our home neighborhoods, yet a very common experience for black people in NYC during the time that policy was in place (and most likely before and after, to some extent).  These are just several examples of the 'dust in the air' that most of us do not see all the time.

Another concept talked about which resonated with me was the concept of society  being a set of contracts between various groups of people, with the understanding that all the groups will honor the contracts equally with all the other groups.   

But what happens when one community - like law enforcement - continually - over many decades -  breaks or doesn't honor the contract with just one of the other groups (like people of color).   When peaceful protest has been tried many times over the decades, when they're told that's not the right way to protest, or they're told now is not the time...    Yes, they can vote, can propose changes through the legislative processes, but  there is only so much that oppressed communities can do - all on their own - to change the situation without the support of the community that put in place the structures that create the oppression.  

I have seen a lot of issues that have been brought to light in the past few months - not just the police brutality or issues that just affect the people of color, but the pandemic has also brought to light other inequalities - economic, health care, access to safe drinking water, etc. - that I hadn't realized existed to the extent that they do in our country.  I think we are at a tipping point right now, and that we really need to give a lot of reflection and thought about how we want to move into the future. 

To the topic of Black Lives Matter, I do think that if the collective "we" of our country decide to work on dismantling systemic racism and then work on rebuilding our policies and social constructs that remove roadblocks based on racism,  that work will ultimately benefit others as well.  I do believe that if we lift up others, it will lift all up.   

I don't have answers, just a lot of new information for me that I'm trying to understand and put together in my mind, and then trying to figure out how to respond to, in a way that will make a difference somehow or somewhere.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

There have been many great posts on this thread of books and articles to read. Lots of stats and facts which are important. There is a loud voice around the nation full of individual voices that have stories to tell about a problem that is not borne in the statistics. It's been growing and is now such a strong community feeling that it is even passed on to the next generation. That's not something to balk about, even if you don't believe that feelings bear weight. It exists. It's here right now. It's physically manifested in these demonstrations.

Changing the name of the movement isn't going to help to get the conversation moving any faster.

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Moira Timmerman said:

I have seen a lot of issues that have been brought to light in the past few months - not just the police brutality or issues that just affect the people of color, but the pandemic has also brought to light other inequalities - economic, health care, access to safe drinking water, etc. - that I hadn't realized existed to the extent that they do in our country.  I think we are at a tipping point right now, and that we really need to give a lot of reflection and thought about how we want to move into the future.

I have heard more than one commentator say something along the lines of "Somehow, this time is different." I'm hopeful that that's true -- that maybe this is a tipping point as you put it.

Speaking as someone who is not American, I've also really been heartened to see the protests here in Canada, in Britain, and elsewhere around the world. Because, while the specific national, historical, and cultural contexts are very different, the one thing we all have in common is entrenched systemic racism. In Canada, that's certainly an issue with black Canadians, but an even larger problem has been our treatment of First Nations People.

I'm really hoping that this is the beginning of something bigger and lasting.

  • Like 12
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

I have heard more than one commentator say something along the lines of "Somehow, this time is different." I'm hopeful that that's true -- that maybe this is a tipping point as you put it.

Speaking as someone who is not American, I've also really been heartened to see the protests here in Canada, in Britain, and elsewhere around the world. Because, while the specific national, historical, and cultural contexts are very different, the one thing we all have in common is entrenched systemic racism. In Canada, that's certainly an issue with black Canadians, but an even larger problem has been our treatment of First Nations People.

I'm really hoping that this is the beginning of something bigger and lasting.

I think so!  Did you see my post that the Los Angeles City Council will be re-directing over 100 million dollars elsewhere instead of into The Los Angeles Police Department?   What about incentive programs here for lives beyond drugs?   Word on this was just released about two days ago.  

Edited by FairreLilette
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Oh no, mate. You stay well out of this green and pleasant land. As horrifying as it is to be trapped on a small island in a pandemic with the Tories, we can do without your brand of heroics. Just stay home and have a nice cup of Boston tea.

ftfy&m

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

What about incentive programs here for lives beyond drugs?

The much more important issue, generally, is the broader inequities. Black Americans tend to be poorer, they often have less access to medical insurance and good healthcare, they don't have, generally, the same educational opportunities, etc., etc. It's all connected. And it all needs to be fixed, because anything else is just a bandage.

Edited by Scylla Rhiadra
Cuz grammar
  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Beth Macbain said:

Okay, I'm just going to say it.

The black community does funerals about elebenty bazillion times better than anyone else. 

This ^^^^

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Beth Macbain said:

Okay, I'm just going to say it.

The black community does funerals about elebenty bazillion times better than anyone else. 

And they do it even better in New Orleans. Pronounced New Oar-leans, not Nawlins. Unless you're from Avoyelles Parish.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

The much more important issue, generally, is the broader inequities. Black Americans tend to be poorer, they often have less access to medical insurance and good healthcare, they don't have, generally, the same educational opportunities, etc., etc. It's all connected. And it all needs to be fixed, because anything else is just a bandage.

Yeah, but spending all this money on a drug war has not worked, and the drug war touches all classes though some kids are just born into this mess.  It's different if you live here.  My nephew lives in another state as he was an addict but is now clean in another state.  The drug war is bad here.  Kids need incentive programs for other opportunities.  The rest is assuredly needed too.  Spend the money on the people to have a better life and the drugs may fade away and the law enforcement not even needed then.    

Edited by FairreLilette
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

I think so!  Did you see my post that the Los Angeles City Council will be re-directing over 100 million dollars elsewhere instead of into The Los Angeles Police Department?   What about incentive programs here for lives beyond drugs?   Word on this was just released about two days ago.  

I saw Scylla quote this... sigh.

The sentence, above, that I emphasized made me cringe. I'm just imagining someone with a mindset of "those people" who are "all on drugs" and when we get "them" off drugs, they can be people again, maybe.

I'm not denying some black people have drug problems, so does every other race and so does every class system of every race.

Honestly, this struck me like someone saying, "we" can "help" THEM with hunger issues and you've heard "they" like watermelon.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Sylvia Tamalyn said:

@Moira Timmerman's post above reminded me of this video from Trevor Noah, which I came across a few days ago on Facebook. Please listen if you haven't watched it already:

That was one of the videos I watched yesterday, and it was very powerful.  Especially because it was just him explaining his thoughts and trying to understand events - not part of his produced show. 

11 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

I have heard more than one commentator say something along the lines of "Somehow, this time is different." I'm hopeful that that's true -- that maybe this is a tipping point as you put it.

Speaking as someone who is not American, I've also really been heartened to see the protests here in Canada, in Britain, and elsewhere around the world. Because, while the specific national, historical, and cultural contexts are very different, the one thing we all have in common is entrenched systemic racism. In Canada, that's certainly an issue with black Canadians, but an even larger problem has been our treatment of First Nations People.

I'm really hoping that this is the beginning of something bigger and lasting.

Clearly, there is systemic racism in many countries between a variety of races and/or skin color differences, so I think conceptually it relates to many.  We don't hear enough voices here about racism issues with our First Nations people, but one of the things brought to light from pandemic news which really saddened me was a lack of readily available water in the Navaho Nation.  I know that's just one of many issues, I'm sure, but sometimes something catastrophic has to happen before the rest of us see the problems.  I was glad @Selene Gregoire had posted the statistics she did several days ago regarding treatment of First Nation people here in the U.S. by law enforcement. 

Another interview I listened to yesterday mentioned that the schools teach white history, but it's up to each of us ourselves to learn the history perspective of other groups here - that they (members of the other groups) shouldn't always be having to teach us their history perspective. 

Several of the interviews I watched yesterday mentioned things that were giving them a sense of hope.  I hope the momentum of this particular moment stays alive.

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

Spend the money on the people to have a better life and the drugs may fade away

I think that this is exactly the point. But that's not just true, as Gato points out, of black Americans; that association is another kind of reactionary dog whistle, unfortunately.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Sylvia Tamalyn said:

@Moira Timmerman's post above reminded me of this video from Trevor Noah, which I came across a few days ago on Facebook. Please listen if you haven't watched it already:

 

 

Just watched this. God, I love this man. And he's so smart.

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Gatogateau said:

I saw Scylla quote this... sigh.

The sentence, above, that I emphasized made me cringe. I'm just imagining someone with a mindset of "those people" who are "all on drugs" and when we get "them" off drugs, they can be people again, maybe.

I'm not denying some black people have drug problems, so does every other race and so does every class system of every race.

Honestly, this struck me like someone saying, "we" can "help" THEM with hunger issues and you've heard "they" like watermelon.

You tend to see and read things so negatively and spin it towards trying to direct things at posters that they never said and/or to direct it at yourself that you have somehow been offended and/or it's all about YOU again, which many posters have pointed you have a tendency to do.  It's you doing that.  It's your personality that does that.  

Well, you see things your way but the drug war here is very real.  It crosses over to all classes, but there is "talk" here, even by the media, of known "drug infested areas", does that mean they are all Black...no.  Some of these kids are born into drug infested areas and gangs.  It's just the way it is.   

But, If you can't deal with the reality of drug infested areas and gang infested areas and want to put a racial profile on that, that is just ignorant.  There are gangs of all skin tones here including Caucasian, Asian, Latino, Black.  

Just because this is in a BLM matter thread my comment was not directed at Blacks only.  The drug war is everywhere here; it's a failed war.  Spend it on the people for opportunities beyond drugs and the law enforcement won't even be needed.  

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, FairreLilette said:

Just because this is in a BLM matter thread my comment was not directed at Blacks only.  The drug war is everywhere here; it's a failed war.  Spend it on the people for opportunities beyond drugs and the law enforcement won't even be needed.

Yes, thank you for this clarification. Absolutely.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 94 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...