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Just now, Selene Gregoire said:

About as many as there are ones that learned how to sew.

one of the best things to come out of sending my boys to beavers, cubs then scouts... when a button comes off they don't even bother to ask now :) 

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Fear will kill us before any illness ever should. Practice social distancing, wash your hands thoroughly and often. Get lots of rest and look after your general health. Covid-19 is potential

I am, but I have every reason to be, and I think it would be extremely abnormal, problematic and likely damaging if I wasn't.  Just as I think the overall lack of fear in far too many is precisely tha

I know the news seems terrifying, Chilli (may I call you that?). There is tremendous uncertainty around the world right now, but still a lot we can do individually and collectively to care for ourselv

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24 minutes ago, Lindal Kidd said:

Flour will keep practically forever if you simply keep it in something that will seal tightly, such as a Tupperware container.  

Apparently, self-rising flour, even kept in Tupperware, loses it's "rise" ability over time.  My daughter, attempting to bake with my year old flour, confirmed that point for her.  Maybe it is worse at high altitude.  All I know is that the cookies and cake did not rise.  After a baking fail on 2 trips home, she decided that she will always buy new flour when she comes to visit.

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5 minutes ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

Apparently, self-rising flour, even kept in Tupperware, loses it's "rise" ability over time.  My daughter, attempting to bake with my year old flour, confirmed that point for her.  Maybe it is worse at high altitude.  All I know is that the cookies and cake did not rise.  After a baking fail on 2 trips home, she decided that she will always buy new flour when she comes to visit.

Higher altitudes do require different "techniques" when baking.

https://www.wheatmontana.com/content/high-altitude-baking-how-make-your-recipes-work-mountains

https://www.bettycrocker.com/how-to/tipslibrary/baking-tips/baking-cooking-high-altitudes

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Just now, Selene Gregoire said:

My daughter does do all of the recipe & cooking modifications for high altitude, but she does still use self rising flour rather than non w/ yeast.  She's the baker of the family, not me.  I'm not even sure I can remember the last time I used flour for anything.

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I have a breadmaker so I make a lot of my own bread, pizza bases, vegetable and fruit loaves  etc (great for fresh stuff that would go off otherwise), plus my son loves baking. So I use a lot of flour anyway. I have tried growing my own veg but the fecking slugs get everything that puts out a shoot.

Sewing is definitely not obsolete. There's a whole subculture around knitting, crocheting, making one's own clothes or upcycling old ones, complete with blogs etc. My favourite is the Refashionista. It often goes hand in hand with the subculture around vintage fashion and aesthetics, although "vintage" always seems to mean 1940s and 50s. I haven't seen anyone trying to bring back shell suits and shoulder pads.

 

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These days, if I can't do the sewing with my sewing machine, then I can't do it.  My fingers can't do any sort of needle work anymore.  It's actually a shame - I used to enjoy crochet and cross-stitch quite a bit.

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40 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

About as many as there are ones that learned how to sew. Two things that were huge parts of my life are now obsolete. That's been in the last 20 years. No, I don't like it because it means humans are no longer self sufficient. Think about what that means for the future. All the knowledge necessary for survival in a nontech world lost because people got lazy thanks to huge corporations.

If things really go south, the vast majority of people don't have the first clue how to garden/farm, bake, sew, do carpentry, all the things that we used to learn as part of our daily lives and that is when society and civilization starts breaking down at breakneck speed.

Yeah, us old people are useless. 9_9

When my kids were little I sewed, baked all our bread, made yogurt and muesli , grew our vegetables etc. They only remember eating a lot of Mac and cheese when I went back to teaching. 

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Just now, LittleMe Jewell said:

These days, if I can't do the sewing with my sewing machine, then I can't do it.  My fingers can't do any sort of needle work anymore.  It's actually a shame - I used to enjoy crochet and cross-stitch quite a bit.

I did crosstich! I made a really beautiful sampler for my daughter. Only took me eighteen years to finish it.

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2 minutes ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

These days, if I can't do the sewing with my sewing machine, then I can't do it.  My fingers can't do any sort of needle work anymore.  It's actually a shame - I used to enjoy crochet and cross-stitch quite a bit.

Knitting?

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4 minutes ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

These days, if I can't do the sewing with my sewing machine, then I can't do it.  My fingers can't do any sort of needle work anymore.  It's actually a shame - I used to enjoy crochet and cross-stitch quite a bit.

Have you ever tried needlepoint? If you can hold a large needle and poke it through "ready made" holes then you might enjoy it. I used to love it and cross stitch and embroidery. I just can't afford to do them any more. 

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bargello-needlepoint-pattern.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

When my kids were little I sewed, baked all our bread, made yogurt and muesli , grew our vegetables etc. They only remember eating a lot of Mac and cheese when I went back to teaching. 

There are some things that are worth "turning back the clock".

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8 minutes ago, Lindal Kidd said:

Knitting?

Years ago, back when my hands & fingers worked better, I tried knitting and just didn't like it.

The issue is holding the needles, even large ones.  My thumbs can't grip the way they used to, in that thumb & first finger pinch hold style.  I also can't write very well anymore because I can only hold a pen/pencil roughly long enough to sign my name.  The last time I actually had to write a check it took 3 sessions to get all of the things written.  Everything cramps up too bad too quickly.

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6 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

Have you ever tried needlepoint? If you can hold a large needle and poke it through "ready made" holes then you might enjoy it. I used to love it and cross stitch and embroidery. I just can't afford to do them any more. 

 

I did do some needlepoint for a while when the cross-stitching and embroidery got difficult.  That was along the same time that I learned crocheting.  After I learned crocheting and before the needlework got too painful, I even did a project that was a cross-stitched design on top of a crochet afghan.  That one took FOREVER and was the last large needlework thing that I did.  I managed a few smaller projects for a while after that, but when the pain makes a project stretch across multiple years, it just gets too frustrating.

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To be honest... I'm slightly concerned, but, more annoyed. I'll explain.

Sure, it's a global pandemic, and people are dying from it, and sure, we're all related to someone potentially succeptable, so, yeah, from that point, I'm concerned. But, what I'm more concerned about is being unable to get or have foodstuffs for my loved ones. 

That previous statement, coincidentally enough, is why I'm annoyed with it. I have a produce growing business type of thing to get up and running and I can't even order the equipment I need, to start, on Amazon because it's shut down except the essentials, and it's potentially a health hazard. 

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7 minutes ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

Years ago, back when my hands & fingers worked better, I tried knitting and just didn't like it.

The issue is holding the needles, even large ones.  My thumbs can't grip the way they used to, in that thumb & first finger pinch hold style.  I also can't write very well anymore because I can only hold a pen/pencil roughly long enough to sign my name.  The last time I actually had to write a check it took 3 sessions to get all of the things written.  Everything cramps up too bad too quickly.

Fun thing about needlepoint is you don't have to use your thumbs. When mine would get sore I'd switch to using the index and middle fingers to pull the needle through. You could also use hemostats or small round nosed (jewelers) pliers.

Edited by Selene Gregoire
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Aside from the nutritional and financial benefits of baking my own bread (minus, I suppose, the time when I could be doing something else) the greatest benefit for me is the exercise. Kneading bread involves upper body movement and feels wonderful on your hands. As I grow older, I gradually understand why my mother enjoyed baking, washing dishes, and all sorts of other hand-intensive work. Creaky tendons and arthritic joints need limbering up and warmth. If I can do that and be preparing food or cleaning pots at the same time, it's a win all around.

Having said that, I admit that I do much less baking than I used to when there were others around to eat it. Necessity may be the mother of invention, but the lack of necessity is an incentive killer.

20 minutes ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Sewing is definitely not obsolete.

True, but sadly fabric stores are ... or they are at least becoming an endangered corner of the market. The only fabric store in my own community closed several years ago, and the one that's 45 miles away is not what it used to be.  Even the big box stores that used to have fabric sections have abandoned them. Sewing is largely for repairs now, and even that is becoming a lost art. It's cheaper to buy new clothes from SE Asia than to make your own, or even repair them. I agree about knitting, though. My DIL always carries a bag with her current projects, and spends her moments of idle time with needles in her hands. Yarn is always her favorite gift at birthday and Christmas time. Knitting is definitely alive and well.

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10 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

Fun thing about needlepoint is you don't have to use your thumbs. When mine would get sore I'd switch to using the index and middle fingers to pull the needle through. You could also use hemostats or small round nosed (jewelers) pliers.

Hmm - never thought of that.  Might have to give that a try.

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6 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Aside from the nutritional and financial benefits of baking my own bread (minus, I suppose, the time when I could be doing something else) the greatest benefit for me is the exercise. Kneading bread involves upper body movement and feels wonderful on your hands. As I grow older, I gradually understand why my mother enjoyed baking, washing dishes, and all sorts of other hand-intensive work. Creaky tendons and arthritic joints need limbering up and warmth. If I can do that and be preparing food or cleaning pots at the same time, it's a win all around.

Having said that, I admit that I do much less baking than I used to when there were others around to eat it. Necessity may be the mother of invention, but the lack of necessity is an incentive killer.

True, but sadly fabric stores are ... or they are at least becoming an endangered corner of the market. The only fabric store in my own community closed several years ago, and the one that's 45 miles away is not what it used to be.  Even the big box stores that used to have fabric sections have abandoned them. Sewing is largely for repairs now, and even that is becoming a lost art. It's cheaper to buy new clothes from SE Asia than to make your own, or even repair them. I agree about knitting, though. My DIL always carries a bag with her current projects, and spends her moments of idle time with needles in her hands. Yarn is always her favorite gift at birthday and Christmas time. Knitting is definitely alive and well.

My DIL spins, weaves, and knits. I have never knitted but I know it is a huge community. Joyce Vance mentions it often. 
 

Also she and my son have a large garden and raise chickens. My daughter makes kefir and sauerkraut and other fermented stuff.

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7 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

True, but sadly fabric stores are ... or they are at least becoming an endangered corner of the market. The only fabric store in my own community closed several years ago, and the one that's 45 miles away is not what it used to be.  Even the big box stores that used to have fabric sections have abandoned them. Sewing is largely for repairs now, and even that is becoming a lost art. It's cheaper to buy new clothes from SE Asia than to make your own, or even repair them.

And that is what makes me so sad about it all. That and cloth has gotten so damned expensive. 

Yes, this sort of thing does bother me. A lot. It is painful to watch so many things that mean so much be tossed aside without a care. Remember when things like phones were considered luxuries... 

When I was little my mother made most of my clothes. She stopped because she no longer had time due to dealing with my oldest brother being such a dick and constantly getting in trouble or trouble with the law. That's when we both started having to do without. Her more so than me since whatever she would have spent for her own clothing, she would use to cloth me. I just had to hear my other brother bitching at me for getting new school clothes when he had already gotten his. I wasn't allowed to wear jeans to school until the last year or two of high school.

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The CDC is now weighing whether to have everyone in America wear a mask.  I said that what seems like weeks ago, that we need to do this when masks become available.  The data suggests the wearing of masks by everyone in China, Taiwan and other Asian places is helping tremendously.  I am planning on wearing my own bandanna now across my face when going about my building.   

I think it may be time to cover our noses.  Viruses seem to thrive in moisture...like our nose, mouth, throat, and maybe lungs and eyes.  Perhaps lungs are "moist".  I know eyes are.   Unfortunately, I've read the virus when airborne can also get in our eyes.  How we can cover our eyes...I don't know....but we can wash the eyes with soap and water.  

Edited by FairreLilette
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I wonder who will pays for masks for those of us who don't have any and can't afford to buy them even if they were available in the stores.

What will they do about those of us who can not wear them to begin with? Damn things give me a rash on top of making it harder for me to breathe. 

Guess I'm just screwed again huh.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/cdc-considering-recommending-general-public-wear-face-coverings-in-public/ar-BB11W3xA?li=BBnb7Kz

Edited by Selene Gregoire
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13 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

The CDC is now weighing whether to have everyone in America wear a mask.  I said that what seems like weeks ago, that we need to do this when masks become available.  The data suggests the wearing of masks by everyone in China, Taiwan and other Asian places is helping tremendously.  I am planning on wearing my own bandanna now across my face when going about my building.   

I think it may be time to cover our noses.  Viruses seem to thrive in moisture...like our nose, mouth, throat, and maybe lungs and eyes.  Perhaps lungs are "moist".  I know eyes are.   Unfortunately, I've read the virus when airborne can also get in our eyes.  How we can cover our eyes...I don't know....but we can wash the eyes with soap and water.  

Yes the data is clear, any kind of mask, even a bandana, helps significantly. The problem is we still don’t have enough for the soldiers we are sending into battle for us (in hospitals). Look at this graph:

https://www.maskssavelives.org/?fbclid=IwAR0d3hF3EhBcHgUp22v6xtAGQO6J7UGWpw46J8KPAHf0r-h1FVCe8KUL9MI

 

Edited by Pamela Galli
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