Jump to content

A Derail Thread


You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 375 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, BelindaN said:

Oh Boy! Books? I struggle to find time, especially now I'm hooked on SL...………..

I have a shedload of books to read, but when and how????? 

I read my kindle some nights before bed and anytime I'm in a waiting room of any sort and constantly when traveling.  I can't stand reading the forums - or pretty much any web stuff - on my phone, so when I'm traveling, I only read the forums on my laptop in the hotel room each evening or morning. In airports, on airplanes, in cars.... it is all kindle reading (okay, not in cars if I'm the one driving).

 

3 hours ago, Selene Gregoire said:

Maybe forego the forums one or two nights a week?

It's not going to kill you, you know. :PxD;)

Bite your tongue.  

:D

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Lindal Kidd said:

Belinda, we all love you dear, but DON'T read the Forums...or use a computer or anything with a screen (except an electronic ink type like a Kindle reader) before you go to sleep.  The blue light from the screen is thought by many to contribute to insomnia and difficulty falling asleep.

Awwww thanks Lindal...…..I know, I'm a rebel, ...….but so far, I hit the pillow and bang!...…………..instant zedding……...

Of course I get some heat for surfing on my phone in bed, from somebody who does the same btw,  but it's a small price to pay hehe!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/18/2019 at 1:12 PM, Love Zhaoying said:

My favorite SF novel, “The Stars My Destination”, was considered a Space Opera. By Alfred Bester.

It's not considered a space opera by me, but then what do I know? We do at least share a fondness for Alfred Bester. I took a pic of me going for a ride in my beautiful new rocket ship once; the filename I gave it was The Stars Our Destination.png .

 

 

Like a lot of people I liked "The Demolished Man" better but they are both absolute must reads for anyone interested in Science Fiction.

The Stars Our Destination.png

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Dillon Levenque said:

It's not considered a space opera by me, but then what do I know? We do at least share a fondness for Alfred Bester. I took a pic of me going for a ride in my beautiful new rocket ship once; the filename I gave it was The Stars Our Destination.png .

 

 

Like a lot of people I liked "The Demolished Man" better but they are both absolute must reads for anyone interested in Science Fiction.

The Stars Our Destination.png

Agreed. Stars is supposedly a space “ Count of Monte Christo”.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Love Zhaoying said:

The husky rescue called one of my references, I’m one step closer! I will visit the organization’s tent at an adopt-a-thon this Saturday.

It's been almost 2 years since we lost our two huskies - one from cancer and the other one from old age & loneliness exactly 9 days later -- and my husband still isn't ready to get another.  So just a couple of kitties keeping us company right now.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

It's been almost 2 years since we lost our two huskies - one from cancer and the other one from old age & loneliness exactly 9 days later -- and my husband still isn't ready to get another.  So just a couple of kitties keeping us company right now.

If I had any pet I’d probably not be rushing.  Almost a month, finally used to being alone, but I don’t like it. Trying to adopt a bonded pair.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

It's been almost 2 years since we lost our two huskies - one from cancer and the other one from old age & loneliness exactly 9 days later -- and my husband still isn't ready to get another.  So just a couple of kitties keeping us company right now.

 

It's really hard to get over losing a beloved dog.  We lost our Molly in October of 2015 and it's only been about 6 months now that we've started looking for another.  So far it's been really hard to find a dog that can compete with the wonderful memories we have.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/18/2019 at 1:12 PM, Love Zhaoying said:

My favorite SF novel, “The Stars My Destination”, was considered a Space Opera. By Alfred Bester.

 

On 2/20/2019 at 10:35 AM, Dillon Levenque said:

It's not considered a space opera by me, but then what do I know? We do at least share a fondness for Alfred Bester. I took a pic of me going for a ride in my beautiful new rocket ship once; the filename I gave it was The Stars Our Destination.png .

 

 

Like a lot of people I liked "The Demolished Man" better but they are both absolute must reads for anyone interested in Science Fiction.

The Stars Our Destination.png

 

On 2/20/2019 at 11:43 AM, Love Zhaoying said:

Agreed. Stars is supposedly a space “ Count of Monte Christo”.

I know I read “The Stars My Destination” but all I remember is something about nomad and a guy with tattoos.   And I remember I really liked it too.  Gonna have to re-read that one.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

How did you come to that conclusion?

I've been reading scifi for 45 years and haven't read either one.  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

1. “The Demolished Man” holds the distinction of winning the first Hugo award. Bester’s writing style includes weird text visuals, odd linguistics, butchering language into a patois, psychological romps..

2. “The Stars My Destination” used to be #1 on some “best of” lists.

Both were written more than 45 years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Love Zhaoying said:

1. “The Demolished Man” holds the distinction of winning the first Hugo award. Bester’s writing style includes weird text visuals, odd linguistics, butchering language into a patois, psychological romps..

2. “The Stars My Destination” used to be #1 on some “best of” lists.

Both were written more than 45 years ago.

I appreciate your answer Love but I was asking Dilly. :)

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

How did you come to that conclusion?

I've been reading scifi for 45 years and haven't read either one.  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I came to the conclusion the same way I come to many conclusions: independently and without consulting any outside sources. I find I am far more often satisfied with conclusions obtained in this manner than by using any other method.

In truth, they really are considered classics. 'The Demolished Man' was almost avant-garde, at least for 1950's Science Fiction.

I did just take a look at Wikipedia; sources there at least make a case for me. It mentions he won the FIRST EVER Hugo Award, and Harry Harrison is quoted as saying, "Alfred Bester was one of the handful of writers who invented modern science fiction."

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Dillon Levenque said:

I came to the conclusion the same way I come to many conclusions: independently and without consulting any outside sources. I find I am far more often satisfied with conclusions obtained in this manner than by using any other method.

In truth, they really are considered classics. 'The Demolished Man' was almost avant-garde, at least for 1950's Science Fiction.

I did just take a look at Wikipedia; sources there at least make a case for me. It mentions he won the FIRST EVER Hugo Award, and Harry Harrison is quoted as saying, "Alfred Bester was one of the handful of writers who invented modern science fiction."

So you are saying they are "absolute must reads" in the sense that they are considered classics and not because you, personally, believe everyone should read them even if they are not the kind of scifi others enjoy?

Not sure if I am being very clear with my question. I'm not sure how to word it without making it sound like I'm accusing you of trying to force the books on others. That isn't the motivation behind my question. Perhaps what I should be asking is how you define "absolute must reads".

Sorry if I'm not making much or any sense. Just started a new job a couple of days ago and I'm having trouble adjusting to a swing shift after working in a place where my schedule changed drastically from one week to the next so I'm very tired. Didn't help that my cat decided I had slept long enough and made it impossible to sleep past 8:30 am this morning. He yelled at me until I got up. ^_^

Edited by Selene Gregoire
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

I just read the Wikipedia entry for Friday. I think I'm flattered, but really don't consider myself a pro. I'm an agonist for the fun of it.

This reminds me of my very favorite leading character name of all time:  Hiro Protagonist, in Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash.

We can debate all day about who's a great SF writer, but Alfred Bester is certainly right up there with the other greats.  Here are some of MY personal favorites.

  • Robert A. Heinlein
  • Isaac Asimov
  • Arthur C. Clarke
  • Neal Stephenson
  • Lois McMaster Bujold
  • Larry Niven (especially in partnership with Jerry Pournelle; I like them better together than either separately)
  • Alfred Bester
  • Poul Anderson
  • Frederik Pohl
  • Greg Bear
  • Robert Asprin
  • David Weber
  • Spider Robinson
  • James Blish
  • Ray Bradbury
  • David Brin
  • Roger Zelazny
  • Hal Clement
  • L. Sprague de Camp
  • Joe Haldeman
  • Theodore Sturgeon
  • Keith Laumer
  • C.J. Cherryh
  • Mike Resnick
  • John Varley
  • Peter F. Hamilton

Many others, but for one reason or another, I didn't put them on the list.  For example, Harlan Ellison...but I see him as more an essayist than an SF author.  Likewise Anne McCaffrey, who I consider more of a fantasy writer than SFnal.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Lindal Kidd said:
  • Robert A. Heinlein*
  • Isaac Asimov*
  • Arthur C. Clarke*
  • Neal Stephenson
  • Lois McMaster Bujold
  • Larry Niven * (especially in partnership with Jerry Pournelle; I like them better together than either separately)
  • Alfred Bester *
  • Poul Anderson *
  • Frederik Pohl *
  • Greg Bear *
  • Robert Asprin
  • David Weber 
  • Spider Robinson *
  • James Blish +
  • Ray Bradbury *
  • David Brin
  • Roger Zelazny *
  • Hal Clement
  • L. Sprague de Camp *
  • Joe Haldeman *
  • Theodore Sturgeon *
  • Keith Laumer *
  • C.J. Cheryh *
  • Mike Resnick
  • John Varley *
  • Peter F. Hamilton

I *’d the ones I’ve read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jerry Pournelle's name was familiar to me, so I just Googled him. I apparently know of him from his technical writing, perhaps in Byte magazine, which was popular during my days in the Milwaukee Computer Club. I know I've read Heinlein, Asimov, Clark, and Bradbury. Blish sounds familiar and I might have read some of the other authors, but don't recall them.

I don't see Walter Miller on Lindal's list, perhaps because he's the Harper Lee of science fiction, having published only one novel during his life "A Canticle for Leibowitz", which won the Hugo in 1961. Its sequel was completed by another writer after his death.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 375 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...