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12 hours ago, Leia36 said:

I'm alive, apparently I slept through the whole thing, hello Perrie, its been far to long

 

14591726_1294662407283416_6150344423197111301_n.jpg

because shoes duh!

While I am not a shoe fetish per se I will have to say those look yummy. Very yummy!

/me searches for a bottle of champagne.

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9 hours ago, Perrie Juran said:

Is your twin still around?  I miss her.  She was kind of sweet.

Oh? As in, *I* am not?????? 

Hmmmph. >:(

Actually, I suppose I might just have proven your point . . .

Yeah yeah. She'll probably drop by at some point. She's a bit of an Attention Wh*re, after all.

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23 hours ago, Perrie Juran said:

Is your twin still around?  I miss her.  She was kind of sweet.

Look! Here I am! Being sweet, and stuff!!

Have a cuppa, do! Biscuit?

/me skips gaily through the thread, strewing sunshine and flowers to the left and right.

(>:()

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14 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Oh? As in, *I* am not?????? 

Hmmmph. >:(

Actually, I suppose I might just have proven your point . . .

Yeah yeah. She'll probably drop by at some point. She's a bit of an Attention Wh*re, after all.

Thank you for letting your twin know I missed her.

That was sweet of you.

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17 minutes ago, LaskyaClaren said:

Look! Here I am! Being sweet, and stuff!!

Have a cuppa, do! Biscuit?

/me skips gaily through the thread, strewing sunshine and flowers to the left and right.

(>:()

Hi there Sweet Twin.

I'll gather up some Unicorns and Flutterbies so we can party.

And a Cuppa and Bisuits are always wonderful.

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4 hours ago, Perrie Juran said:

Hi there Sweet Twin.

I'll gather up some Unicorns and Flutterbies so we can party.

And a Cuppa and Bisuits are always wonderful.

Only if they are angry, humourless, FEMINIST unicorns, with horns that gleam with the Blood of the Patriarchy.

As for flutterbies . . . yeah, sure. They're pretty.

Edited by LaskyaClaren
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1 hour ago, LaskyaClaren said:

Only if they are angry, humourless, FEMINIST unicorns, with horns that gleam with the Blood of the Patriarchy.

As for flutterbies . . . yeah, sure. They're pretty.

So then you'd be interested in a Triad?

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20 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

I had to go to the Urban Dictionary for that, and I still don't know what you're actually getting at . . . except that it had better not be meanings 3 through 14.

Sometimes the Martian's command of English slang is lacking. 

And sometimes it isn't.  ;)

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I do believe this is the first time I have seen a thread that within itself contained relevant posts by Maddy, Snugs, Scylla, and Laskya. I like it!

Scylla, it's lovely to see your name again (no offense, Laskya, it's just Scylla's the one I knew first).

This will probably bore the hell out of everyone else, but since you mentioned finishing your PhD (I congratulate you) in chicklit—KIDDING! PUT THAT DOWN!—I've been heavily promoting a fairly new book I brought home recently. It's a novel, set mostly in the Middle East. Starts in Iraq after the end of Desert Storm (that was the war about Kuwait); ends in fairly modern times still mostly in and around Iraq. There's a passage in which a couple of fairly central characters are talking. One, a French officer, talks of women and feminism in one of the most powerfully moving things I've read in quite a while. I re-read it several times. The book can be tough: Iraq in the last twenty years has not had a happy time and some very ugly things happen, but I whole-heartedly recommend reading it. You'll know the passage when you see it. "The Girl in Green", Derek B. Miller.

Edited by Dillon Levenque
Didn't put a space before 'Snugs'. One should always put a space before Snugs.
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1 hour ago, Dillon Levenque said:

I do believe this is the first time I have seen a thread that within itself contained relevant posts by Maddy, Snugs, Scylla, and Laskya. I like it!

Scylla, it's lovely to see your name again (no offense, Laskya, it's just Scylla's the one I knew first).

This will probably bore the hell out of everyone else, but since you mentioned finishing your PhD (I congratulate you) in chicklit—KIDDING! PUT THAT DOWN!—I've been heavily promoting a fairly new book I brought home recently. It's a novel, set mostly in the Middle East. Starts in Iraq after the end of Desert Storm (that was the war about Kuwait); ends in fairly modern times still mostly in and around Iraq. There's a passage in which a couple of fairly central characters are talking. One, a French officer, talks of women and feminism in one of the most powerfully moving things I've read in quite a while. I re-read it several times. The book can be tough: Iraq in the last twenty years has not had a happy time and some very ugly things happen, but I whole-heartedly recommend reading it. You'll know the passage when you see it. "The Girl in Green", Derek B. Miller.

Hi Dillon! I was wondering why you weren't around here when I dropped by earlier! :)

I don't know the book, but I think I've seen it advertised on the subway here. I will check it out (even if it's not "chicklit" -- I've decided to try expanding my library to books that don't end in marriage or feature slightly crazed but lovable bff characters! 9_9). I'm always looking for really effective and affecting articulations of feminism, LGBTQ and Trans-positive thinking, or perspectives on POC in literature because they can be really powerful teaching tools. It's not hard to explain social justice in logical or polemical terms, but I've always believed that literature can be an especially effective supplement because they engage the empathetic imagination: they help us see things differently through consciousness and experiences that are not our own. They humanize abstractions. I think that's what makes them pleasurable in a way that theoretical arguments and tables of stats never can be (as useful as those are as well).

You are well, I hope? Have you been helping Snugs keep Maddy out of trouble?

Edited by Scylla Rhiadra
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15 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Hi Dillon! I was wondering why you weren't around here when I dropped by earlier! :-)

I don't know the book, but I think I've seen it advertised on the subway here. I will check it out (even if it's not "chicklit" -- I've decided to try expanding my library to books that don't end in marriage or feature slightly crazed but lovable bff characters! 9_9). I'm always looking for really effective and affecting articulations of feminism, LGBTQ and Trans-positive thinking, or perspectives on POC in literature because they can be really powerful teaching tools. It's not hard to explain social justice in logical or polemical terms, but I've always believed that literature can be especially be an especially effective supplement because they engage the empathetic imagination: they help us see things differently through consciousness and experiences that are not our own. They humanize abstractions. I think that's what makes them pleasurable in a way that theoretical arguments and tables of stats never can be (as useful as those are as well).

You are well, I hope? Have you been helping Snugs keep Maddy out of trouble?

It isn't really to do with social justice—well, actually it is but not in the way we usually think of that in North America—but it's very much to do with feminism and women. It's only a couple of paragraphs, but it's very good. The French officer is a guy, by the way, as is his correspondent. In any case it can be introduced with a minimum of background so yes: it could be instructive, I think.

As for your question: we all wish. If Snugs and I were the team assigned to keeping Maddy out of trouble she'd be Snugs, I'd be Shrugs. Because that's about what I'd do when someone came around yelling "Maddy did ......"

Nobody can keep Maddy out of trouble. Maddy IS trouble. She's nefarious, Scylla. Right through to the bone.

 

Cute, though.

Edited by Dillon Levenque
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