Jump to content

The Future of Virtual Worlds


Medhue Simoni
 Share

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 3623 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooo...don't give LL anymore ideas to screw up SL.  How about some of the stuff that's been broken forever!!!! 

There is somewhat of a "divide" between people in Virtual Worlds who enjoy techie stuff and don't do a lot of socializing and those who prefer socializing and could care less about techie stuff, to a point....with a bit of overlap.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Czari Zenovka wrote:

Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooo...don't give LL anymore ideas to screw up SL.  How about some of the stuff that's been broken forever!!!! 

There is somewhat of a "divide" between people in Virtual Worlds who enjoy techie stuff and don't do a lot of socializing and those who prefer socializing and could care less about techie stuff, to a point....with a bit of overlap.

 

I've given up on LL ever fixing anything. 6 years and I'm still waiting for major fixes to the animation system. It's obvious that the coders prefer to work on new toys than fix the broken 1's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Charolotte Caxton wrote:

Isn't a virtual world techie by definition?

Socializing can be done by email or yahoo messenger or by going outside and saying hello to someone.

I'm talking about the techie types who don't leave their workshops vs the social types who enjoy going dancing, enjoy the scenery, "virtually traveling," etc.  That adds a bit more realism to text only venues.   Note - I rp'd quite well in IRC for 15+ years.  In fact, when a visitor to our channel told us about SL, our group said we were quite content on IRC and had no interest in SL.  I got curious and checked SL out...followed by another of our group.  Between us we convinced the others to give it a try and eventually migrated over. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LL = kids playing big business by playing with techie stuff

Residents = grown ups socialising and doing their hobbies and pastimes, hoping not to be interrupted, disabled or otherwise challenged by the playkiddies of LL with their technology kinks

SL = mixing the unmixable ... and failing :smileyindifferent:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am fairly certain that the future of sucessful virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Guilliaume wrote:

I am fairly certain that the future of
sucessful
virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

 

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

I would have to disagree. 1 of the major hurdles for gaming and virtual worlds has always been the controllers. Whether it is a xbox or playstation type of controller, or a keyboard and mouse, for the past 15 years it is 1 of the biggest hurdles in getting average people to come and play. This should be obvious with all the new attempts, like the wii controller and kinect. All have had limited success. Google's glasses will bomb massively, without massive promotion. Of course, massive promotion is always good at pulling all the zombies that will buy anything new. Superimposing the virtual over the real still has many, many years before the public will ever really use it, outside of whether it can even be fun or useful.

Now, although I've never liked wearing anything on my head, a simple baseball cap is quite acceptable, and there can be many modifications for it. Like the video shows, it doesn't take long before your brain treats the virtual character as just another part of your own body. IMHO, what all those other companies are doing is primitive compared to controlling things with your mind. Plus, just think of the savings in healthcare when there is no more carpal tunnel. lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Guilliaume wrote:

I am fairly certain that the future of
sucessful
virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

 

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

I agree. That shift is already happening as the console gaming industry suffers at the hands of mobile. Increasing the richness of our RL experiences is (at least to me) superior to attempts to mimic them from the isolation of our own homes. And the moment someone extends that lightweight, social experience into the home's big screen (which itself is under attack by small screens), I think the console game market will be kneecapped.

We are social creatures. Now that technology can go into the wild with us, there's no going home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Guilliaume wrote:

I am fairly certain that the future of
sucessful
virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

 

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

I agree. That shift is already happening as the console gaming industry suffers at the hands of mobile. Increasing the richness of our RL experiences is (at least to me) superior to attempts to mimic them from the isolation of our own homes. And the moment someone extends that lightweight, social experience into the home's big screen (which itself is under attack by small screens), I think the console game market will be kneecapped.

We are social creatures. Now that technology can go into the wild with us, there's no going home.

It really depends on where you think the future is going. People running around all over the place will stop very soon when gas reaches $6 a gallon. It is unsustainable for people to keep living these hectic lives running everywhere. When I started making stuff in SL, all my running around stopped. Now, during the summer, my son has softball games, but other than that, and grocery shopping, I don't use my car. I live outside of a small downtown area and I walk down there for lunch a few days a week. On the rare occassion that I have to drive, I continuously shake my head at all the zombies driving back and forth to work, wasting hours a day in their cars. Most people that work in an office can easily do all of that from home now. Plus, you not only get your work done, but all your house work too, in a normal work day.

Personally, I feel sorry for all the slaves stuck in traffic wasting their lives away. To me, mobile games is a total sign of just how pathetic their lives are. I get up when I want. Maybe go for a run/walk. Check some online stuff. Do some animating. Chat on FB for a bit. Check my garden. And so on. It's my life. This is the 21 century, while most people are still living in the 20th.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Medhue Simoni wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Guilliaume wrote:

I am fairly certain that the future of
sucessful
virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

 

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

I agree. That shift is already happening as the console gaming industry suffers at the hands of mobile. Increasing the richness of our RL experiences is (at least to me) superior to attempts to mimic them from the isolation of our own homes. And the moment someone extends that lightweight, social experience into the home's big screen (which itself is under attack by small screens), I think the console game market will be kneecapped.

We are social creatures. Now that technology can go into the wild with us, there's no going home.

It really depends on where you think the future is going. People running around all over the place will stop very soon when gas reaches $6 a gallon. It is unsustainable for people to keep living these hectic lives running everywhere. When I started making stuff in SL, all my running around stopped. Now, during the summer, my son has softball games, but other than that, and grocery shopping, I don't use my car. I live outside of a small downtown area and I walk down there for lunch a few days a week. On the rare occassion that I have to drive, I continuously shake my head at all the zombies driving back and forth to work, wasting hours a day in their cars. Most people that work in an office can easily do all of that from home now. Plus, you not only get your work done, but all your house work too, in a normal work day.

Personally, I feel sorry for all the slaves stuck in traffic wasting their lives away. To me, mobile games is a total sign of just how pathetic their lives are. I get up when I want. Maybe go for a run/walk. Check some online stuff. Do some animating. Chat on FB for a bit. Check my garden. And so on. It's my life. This is the 21 century, while most people are still living in the 20th.

If you follow the demographics, you'll see that the very same people who are abandoning cars are the people embracing mobile computing, 20-30 year olds. They are also abandoning console gaming platforms and broadcast TV. Sharing is on the rise, from cars to houses. This sharing is both enabled by and promotes mobile computing. Young people are moving back to the cities from the suburbs, taking public transit, and mingling more than their parents.

I think the present and future you describe is of our generation, not theirs.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Madelaine McMasters wrote:

If you follow the demographics, you'll see the the very same people who are abandoning cars are the people embracing mobile computing, 20-30 year olds. They are also abandoning console gaming platforms and broadcast TV. Sharing is on the rise, from cars to houses. This sharing is both enabled by and promotes mobile computing. 
Young people are moving back to the cities from the suburbs, taking public transit, and mingling more than their parents.

I think the present and future you describe is of our generation, not theirs.

 

 

Not to derail the thread too much, but from my limited knowledge I think you're right about the demographic. Right now in San Francisco there is a considerable flap brewing between established cab companies and several independent smartphone connected networks of people sharing rides for a fee. Grab the app, say where you want to go, and see what's available. Almost all of that seems to be driven primarily by 20 somethings without cars (a demographic that almost did not exist in California 20 years ago).

It's not for me, of course. I just wait for the day someone EMPs the little buggers' phones into so much decorative plastic and alumininum. I'll shake out my 1975 AAA map of San Francisco, find my destination, peer over my spectacles and say, "What's your problem, sonny?". 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Medhue Simoni wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Guilliaume wrote:

I am fairly certain that the future of
sucessful
virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

 

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

I agree. That shift is already happening as the console gaming industry suffers at the hands of mobile. Increasing the richness of our RL experiences is (at least to me) superior to attempts to mimic them from the isolation of our own homes. And the moment someone extends that lightweight, social experience into the home's big screen (which itself is under attack by small screens), I think the console game market will be kneecapped.

We are social creatures. Now that technology can go into the wild with us, there's no going home.

It really depends on where you think the future is going. People running around all over the place will stop very soon when gas reaches $6 a gallon. It is unsustainable for people to keep living these hectic lives running everywhere. When I started making stuff in SL, all my running around stopped. Now, during the summer, my son has softball games, but other than that, and grocery shopping, I don't use my car. I live outside of a small downtown area and I walk down there for lunch a few days a week. On the rare occassion that I have to drive, I continuously shake my head at all the zombies driving back and forth to work, wasting hours a day in their cars. Most people that work in an office can easily do all of that from home now. Plus, you not only get your work done, but all your house work too, in a normal work day.

Personally, I feel sorry for all the slaves stuck in traffic wasting their lives away. To me, mobile games is a total sign of just how pathetic their lives are. I get up when I want. Maybe go for a run/walk. Check some online stuff. Do some animating. Chat on FB for a bit. Check my garden. And so on. It's my life. This is the 21 century, while most people are still living in the 20th.

If you follow the demographics, you'll see that the very same people who are abandoning cars are the people embracing mobile computing, 20-30 year olds. They are also abandoning console gaming platforms and broadcast TV. Sharing is on the rise, from cars to houses. This sharing is both enabled by and promotes mobile computing. 
Young people are moving back to the cities from the suburbs, taking public transit, and mingling more than their parents.

I think the present and future you describe is of our generation, not theirs.

 

Well, I'm old enough to have seen Atari to now Mobile. 1 thing that is consistant all the way thru, is way over inflated hype, and hype chaser screaming their heads off that this and that is done. Mobile, on it's very best day, makes me yawn. It's not even moderately impressive, especially compared to the hype. I think what most people are missing is that there is just more stuff to choose from, compared to 1 thing dominating the arena. Despite consoles getting less and less of the market share, and Xbox and Playstation not releasing a new console in what seems like a decade, games for them are still made. Not just games, but major games, with people still sleeping in lines outside stores for the next release. I can't understand it at all, cause I've always thought console games totally suck compared to Pc games.

I've not looked up what the profit on mobile games is compared to consoles, but I'd be willing to bet that most big name games make a crapload more than even angry birds. It's just the more fringe labels that are really hurting. Plus, this bring up what is actually a success or a failure. Some people think only making half a million is a failure, when in reality it's only a failure if you compare that to the most successful. Heck, just look at SL, almost 10 years on and it is still here making millions. Arguably too, 1 could easily say that most, if not all of it's decline is directly linked to management. So, again, I think it is a matter of mistaking more tools as some kind of massive shift. If this tool is better for that, than use it, but for something more complex, I need that tool. It's all about market share now, not domination.

On my point about the world changing, when the world changes, every1 eventually changes with it. The prime example is a 85 year old getting their first webcam to talk to their great grandkids on skype. Change has nothing at all to do with what 20 somethings are doing. 20 somethings are the most influence by marketing and hype, and they will essentially buy a rock if their favorite singer tells them to. Yeah, whoever made that rock will become millionaires, but it doesn't replace things that actually have substance and usefulness behind it. Controlling things with your brain waves has uber usefullness, efficiency, and it's just fricken cool. It makes mobile, or Google's glasses look like something from the stone age.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...


Medhue Simoni wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Guilliaume wrote:

I am fairly certain that the future of
sucessful
virtual worlds does not include us controlling a computer with our brains. Google, Nintendo, Android and a handful of of other companies are already working on real life HUDs that are interfaced with wearable glasses, handhelds, or windows that superimpose virtual environments over the real world.

 

The future of virtual worlds is not necessarily imersing ourselves even more in virtual reality, but more rather bringing virtual reality in to our reality.

I agree. That shift is already happening as the console gaming industry suffers at the hands of mobile. Increasing the richness of our RL experiences is (at least to me) superior to attempts to mimic them from the isolation of our own homes. And the moment someone extends that lightweight, social experience into the home's big screen (which itself is under attack by small screens), I think the console game market will be kneecapped.

We are social creatures. Now that technology can go into the wild with us, there's no going home.

It really depends on where you think the future is going. People running around all over the place will stop very soon when gas reaches $6 a gallon. It is unsustainable for people to keep living these hectic lives running everywhere. When I started making stuff in SL, all my running around stopped. Now, during the summer, my son has softball games, but other than that, and grocery shopping, I don't use my car. I live outside of a small downtown area and I walk down there for lunch a few days a week. On the rare occassion that I have to drive, I continuously shake my head at all the zombies driving back and forth to work, wasting hours a day in their cars. Most people that work in an office can easily do all of that from home now. Plus, you not only get your work done, but all your house work too, in a normal work day.

Personally, I feel sorry for all the slaves stuck in traffic wasting their lives away. To me, mobile games is a total sign of just how pathetic their lives are. I get up when I want. Maybe go for a run/walk. Check some online stuff. Do some animating. Chat on FB for a bit. Check my garden. And so on. It's my life. This is the 21 century, while most people are still living in the 20th.

It is only unsustainable as long as people continue to rely on fossil fuels. The smart people in society are already well aware of this and are trying hard to make changes in green energy and other such renewable resources to fix this problem, but are being met rather harshly with conservative thinking and business. It is only a matter of time before the progressive, liberal thinking becomes mainstream and people adapt, just like when people were first trying to accept the fact that the Earth was not the center of the universe.

 

And then you talk of wasting time in cars or even working on your garden. That is exatly the reason virtual relaity will expand into reality, rather than the reverse. While people are busy doing menial or solo tasks, they can also use virtual reality to spice up the experiences or even work on other tasks. The thing is, while you think people will grow lazy and tired and retreat to something that is easier, I am certain that the majority of people understand that THIS reality is the only real and permanent thing in their lives and a sane person would never forsake that. Therefore, actions and experiences in this reality will be valued higher than those in a temporal one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 3623 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...