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Just when I thought I knew the metric system, the kilogram has been redefined as an electric current (massive over-simplification, there). https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46143399

Actually I like this, as electricity is something I'm far more conversant with than say, acceleration, inertia, momentum, and gravity. But it has presented me with a small problem.

I want to be able to say 'die kleine h' with a proper German accent, or as close as I can get to one. I know from middle school Conversational German that the two words are pronounced 'decline-uh'. I guess you'd have to be an English speaker to get my pronunciation words, but oh well. What I don't know is how to pronounce the 'h'. In English it's 'aitch' (which right off the top of my head doesn't seem to rhyme with anything). We learned to say the numbers in that class but we never learned to speak the alphabet.

Can one of our several bilingual German/English speakers help? In return I shall tell you the secret way to defeat Maddy's fire attacks.

The reason I want this information is so I can sound really hip around scientists and measurement nerds now that Le Grand K has been replaced by a whole 'nuther thing.

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36 minutes ago, Dillon Levenque said:

I want to be able to say 'die kleine h' with a proper German accent, or as close as I can get to one.

I tried with this and it didn't actually come out half bad:

https://www.ispeech.org/text.to.speech

I think the Americans should blame their strange inability to speak understandable German on the Andrew Sisters. When AS recorded their version of "Bei Mir Bistu Shein" they translated the title to German but they still sang it in Yiddish. That caused a lot of confusion and ever since the Americans have been struggling to distinguish between those two very different languages. ;)

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Blame the British and their Great_Vowel_Shift - they messed it all up - ever since they stumbled over their own pronounciation no Anglophone had any idea how to pronounce Latin scripture...

Reverse the great vowel shift and read it as an Anglo Saxon would have and you will be pretty near (darn Anglo saxons knew no "ei" diptong though, because we invented that later -and ie is German way of writing a long ī )

Edited by Fionalein
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1 hour ago, Dillon Levenque said:

I want to be able to say 'die kleine h' with a proper German accent, or as close as I can get to one.

The IPA is    /dɪ/  /klɛi̯nɛ/  /uːɐ̯/

I wonder... phonetically, with an Aussie-ish accent: dee klynah ha

But my German is likely worse then yours.

(And aussies mostly pronounce h as haych to confuse the matter further .)

52 minutes ago, Fionalein said:

Blame the British and their Great_Vowel_Shift - they messed it all up - ever since they stumbled over their own pronounciation no Anglophone had any idea how to pronounce Latin scripture.

Heh, we can't even agree how to say the same words https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:English_pronunciation

Edited by Callum Meriman
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Oh and as h is a letter and thus a neuter ... it's "das kleine h" unless the h is an abbreviation for something feminine;) -... but to complicate that: if the H is a abbeviation for a noun it would of course be written as a big letter despite being the small one "die kleine H." (as in "not the big Hannelore, the small one").

 

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4 minutes ago, Fionalein said:

Oh and as h is a letter and thus a neuter ... it's "das kleine h" unless the h is an abbreviation for something feminine;) -... but to complicate that: if the H is a abbeviation for a noun it would of course be written as a big letter despite being the small one "die kleine H." (as in "not the big Hannelore, the small one").

In this case it's a symbol, planck's constant, which has the symbol 

Edited by Callum Meriman
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14 minutes ago, Callum Meriman said:

 In this case it's a symbol, planck's constant, which has the symbol 

"das kleine h" then unless it is Planck's reduced constant ħ (h bar) which is just called "h quer" then. AFAIK there is no big H bar in physics so every physicist will understand "h quer" without putting "das kleine" in front of it. But for non physics folks you would write "das kleine h mit einem Querstrich, genannt 'h quer', "

Edited by Fionalein
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Thank you all. I tried ChinRey's auditory thing and the 'h' did sound like 'Ha', as Callum said. I think the 'h' in that translator sounded breathier than we typically pronounce it here, but nonetheless it was 'Ha'.  

As for the gender, I'll leave that to others. Who am I to get fussy about gender, after all? The article I linked did say 'die', but of course that was the BBC.

 

Oh. Just saw Maddy's post.  I forgot the secret!

Run. Really, really fast.

Edited by Dillon Levenque
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14 minutes ago, Fionalein said:

"das kleine h" then unless it is Planck's reduced constant ħ (h bar) which is just called "h quer" then. AFAIK there is no big H bar in physics so every physicist will understand "h quer" without putting "das kleine" in front of it. But for non phyiscs folks you would write "das kleine h mit einem Querstrich, genannt 'h quer', "

I'm pretty sure the whole name thing was just somebody's idea of a clever play on words. The world-certified kilogram of platinum that was the standard apparently really is called 'Le Grand K'.

Edited by Dillon Levenque
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4 minutes ago, Dillon Levenque said:

I'm pretty sure the whole name thing was just somebody's idea of a clever play on words. The world-certified kilogram of platinum that was the standard apparently really is called 'Le Grand K'.

Mmm, good point, from le grand K to das kliene h!

 

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