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Make two parcels to one


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Glad to hear you got your situation worked out.  :matte-motes-smile:

I did want to point out that in step 2 under Joining Land, there's an implication that the two parcels have to share a border.  That's not true.  As long as the two parcels are in the same sim, they can be joined even if they're not touching each other.

Edit:  I was mistaken.

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Hugsy Penguin wrote:

Glad to hear you got your situation worked out.  :matte-motes-smile:

I did want to point out that in step 2 under Joining Land, there's an implication that the two parcels have to share a border.  That's not true.  As long as the two parcels are in the same sim, they can be joined even if they're not touching each other.

 

You are twice mistaken.

 

First of all, the wiki does not "imply", it explicitly states "they share a border at some point". Secondly, attempting to join land that does not share a common border will result in the error "You selected land with different owners. Please select a smaller area and try again." This is because any and all land that is dragged over with the Land Selection Tool will be included in the selection and there is no way of deselecting parts of it.

 

The wiki is correct as written.

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My memory is failing me.  I would have swore that you could join land that didn't share a border and that the system was smart enough to know to just join your land together.  But, every wiki article and video tutorial I can find tells me otherwise.  So, I was wrong on the matter.

Sorry everyone for the wrong information.  :smileyembarrassed:

What was frying my noodle is this:  in Suisun, there's a road that comes up through the southern border, turns, and goes out the eastern border.  There's a parcel of land southeast of the road as well as land to the north and west.  I used to own much of this land including the land southeast of the road.  I know for a fact that, when I trying to sell it, that parcel was subdivided all to itself separate from the land across the road.  But now, it's owned by someone else and joined (same parcel ID) with land across the road.

Thinking about it some more, I now remember that I ended up abandoning the land because I couldn't even get a measly L$1/m for it.  I don't remember what happened to it after I abandoned it.  I guess an LL employee must have joined it which is interesting.  They can join land that doesn't share a border.  Then the person who owns it now bought it from LL as one parcel.

 

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Hugsy Penguin wrote:

My memory is failing me.  I would have swore that you could join land that didn't share a border and that the system was smart enough to know to just join your land together.  But, every wiki article and video tutorial I can find tells me otherwise.  So, I was wrong on the matter.

Sorry everyone for the wrong information.  :smileyembarrassed:

What was frying my noodle is this:  in Suisun, there's a road that comes up through the southern border, turns, and goes out the eastern border.  There's a parcel of land southeast of the road as well as land to the north and west.  I used to own much of this land including the land southeast of the road.  I know for a fact that, when I trying to sell it, that parcel was subdivided all to itself separate from the land across the road.  But now, it's owned by someone else and joined (same parcel ID) with land across the road.

Thinking about it some more, I now remember that I ended up abandoning the land because I couldn't even get a measly L$1/m for it.  I don't remember what happened to it after I abandoned it.  I guess an LL employee must have joined it which is interesting.  They can join land that doesn't share a border.  Then the person who owns it now bought it from LL as one parcel.

 

Very interesting! So, one goes to Suisun and finds it exactly as you described, a parcel bisected by a Linden Road. Having a few extra lindens (thanks to our generous Valentine's Day Gift  *cough, cough), I purchased two small parcels on either side of a Linden Road elsewhere and was able to join them. hmmmm....

 

So, researching exactly what a Linden Road is: It falls within the Linden Department of Public Works under what is known as Protected Routes, which include roads, walking trails, railways, monorails, bridges, ferryboats, sailing routes, etc. And, as it happens, these form immutable, 2 dimensional borders within the mainland regions, however they may be further subdivided.

 

In other words, the wiki is not properly defining what a "border" is. It may be the actual boundary (a one dimensional line that goes from one point to another) between the parcels OR it may be a Protected Route (which is a two dimensional area) separating the parcels.

 

Thank-you for pointing out the short coming!

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  • 5 months later...

I was also able  join my land with a Linden road in between, though I would like to know what the policy is for building a bridge over a linden road to physically walk over to the other piece, without walking across the road on the ground.

 

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This is as close to policy as I can find:

"Warning: Build on protected land or in the skies above it at your own risk! If another Resident reports your build, or if it hampers the use of Second Life, it may be returned without notice."

Source:  English Knowledge Base: Protected land

It's not strictly prohibited, but if it blocks road users or is in any other way an annoyance it will get returned.

I say go for it.  Just make sure to:

 

  • make it well high enough for vehicles to pass under
  • make an effort to make it look good
  • make it it's own link set (don't link it to your shop/house incase it gets returned)
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  • 8 years later...

So...  very interesting!   I recently sold some land, and also to the same buyer sold some prim land that had been abandoned on the same region.  I sold them as two separate parcels, but they have now been joined into one, despite someone else's land being in between them.

My question is, how did they achieve this?  😅🙃

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54 minutes ago, Yukari Kimagawa said:

So...  very interesting!   I recently sold some land, and also to the same buyer sold some prim land that had been abandoned on the same region.  I sold them as two separate parcels, but they have now been joined into one, despite someone else's land being in between them.

My question is, how did they achieve this?  😅🙃

I can't say how they did it, but  I can tell you one way it could be done.  Let's imagine three parcels, A, B, and C that are in line next to one another in order. Join all three into one parcel. Make a separate parcel from the area that was Parcel B before you joined them, and call it Parcel B. Sell Parcel B. You will have two non-contiguous areas that are one parcel.

Edited by Jennifer Boyle
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Thanks for that Jennifer   :)   I knew about that one, and have done it myself.  Thing is, in this case, I know for sure that's not how it was done because it all happened in 5 minutes after I sold the second parcel.  I probably just need to ask her how she did it.  If I find out, and it's not some illegal hack, I'll post it here   :)

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On 2/11/2013 at 4:51 PM, Hugsy Penguin said:

Edit:  I was mistaken.

No, you were not mistaken, it seems.  Those who said you were wrong, were the wrong ones themselves.

You can join parcels which are on the same region no matter how far apart they are!  I have this moment just joined three separate parcels into one, and they were all dozens of metres apart from each other with several other landowners in between.

You just select some of one parcel, drag across to the other, and then choose Join as usual.  The system ignores the fact that you have other people's land selected as well, and just joins your own.

The only pre-requisite would be that, as usual, all land to be joined must be owned by the same individual or group.

It was a long time coming, but we now have the definitive answer. But it does seem that the Wiki is wrong at Point 2 under 'Joining Land' here http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Joining_and_subdividing_land when it states: "Check that both parcels of land are adjacent (they share a border at some point)" - I have just proven that this is not the case.

Edited by Yukari Kimagawa
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2 hours ago, Yukari Kimagawa said:

No, you were not mistaken, it seems. ,,,,t does seem that the Wiki is wrong at Point 2 under 'Joining Land' here http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Joining_and_subdividing_land when it states: "Check that both parcels of land are adjacent (they share a border at some point)" - I have just proven that this is not the case.

most posts already told so... just a few were mistaken.
Not really worth to reopen a 8 yr old thread.

The wiki isn't always the best point to look for answers, some articles are 10 yrs or more before major updates were installed.

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46 minutes ago, Alwin Alcott said:

Not really worth to reopen a 8 yr old thread.

Thank you for your opinion, Alwin  :)   Actually, however, there is no problem to reopen an old thread, if it is still relevant and adds to the sum total knowledge for SL citizens.

I did not find this knowledge on another thread, despite searching, and it is new and useful information for many perhaps.  Of course, I am happy to be wrong  :)

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5 minutes ago, Alwin Alcott said:

the answers except from one poster in this trhead are already correct since 2013

Oh dear   :(

I beg to differ.  I googled and came to this thread looking for the answer I eventually came to by experimentation in-world;  but the conclusion by the end of the 2013 discussion was incorrect.  Since this was the first thread that google yielded on this subject, it seemed relevant to correct it with the accurate and complete answer.

Although the thread had initially been to discuss the simple subject of joining two pieces of land, presumably adjacent ones, it quickly devolved into a discussion of joining non-adjacent pieces.  This was the subject I was myself seeking, and the thread by that time suggested that this could not be achieved.

When actual experience showed me otherwise, I felt it would be useful to present the correction in the same location to which google had led me, so that anyone in future seeking the same information would have it presented clearly and accurately.

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It's conceivable that the behavior might have changed in the eight years since this thread was active but I'm quite sure that's not the case here: The thread and the wiki both contained completely incorrect information until Yukari made her post. I had to test it again myself because it's weird that Hugsy would have agreed to the wrong info, but it definitely works. I was sure that it had worked at some point because I remember the complexity of trying to join two parcels that spanned a third owned by a group of which I was also an owner: trust me, that confuses the system! Anyway, I'm sure I'd been joining non-adjacent parcels since before 2013.

I can't edit the wiki but it would be nice if somebody fixed it. I did go back into the article's history and it's been incorrect—or at least not updated with the now long-current behavior—since Pathfinder Linden wrote it back in 2007.

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Just for the record because it's funny how widespread the belief is, the official knowledge base article from Jeremy Linden also says that the two parcels being joined must share a common border. 

Interestingly, the comment from Irene Muni below the post, written in 2012, states that the parcels must share a common boundary, and Rand Linden thanked her and made the edit to add that to the article. It seems logical to assume that this used to be the case, and somewhere along the way, something changed, but who knows? If people were just going around saying that is the rule, would most of us try it out to see if they were right? (Aside from @Qie Niangao, that is! 😛 )

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46 minutes ago, Sylvia Tamalyn said:

would most of us try it out to see if they were right?

You're completely right about that.  I would never have thought of joining two separated parcels unless I had just seen it done with my own eyes...  I was kind of incredulous, but it was late and my PC was messing up, so I didn't pursue it, and only thought further about it this morning.  Oh well, you can be in SL many years and still have stuff to learn!  :)

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