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About objects permision


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Hi everyone!, my doubt its cuz i read it in the Lindenlab wiki, this link:


https://community.secondlife.com/t5/English-Knowledge-Base/Object-permissions/ta-p/700129


and there I found this part, I quote :


" Permission settings set while object is in your inventory are not cross-checked with contents until rezzed. For example if you place a no-copy item in a copy enabled prim the prim becomes no-copy. If youplace prim in your inventory and change back to copy enabled this state persists even after transferring to another resident because permissions are not cross-checked with contents until the object is rezzed. If you are not careful you can allow receiving resident to copy no-copy items."


Then, I guess permissions can be buged to make a "no-copy" item copy for all...i was wondering how to avoid this, i mean, if i put no modify in a object should be enough, isn't it? am I right? (cuz it cannot be modified to be buged and then make copy the item)


Well that's my worry about this topic.

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Most of the time these days permissions do stick (that wasn't always true in the distant past :D) so that is a good thing.

 

Even after you  understand how the permission system works, the very best and SURE method is to test with an alt that does not have permission to edit your objects. So send the item to the alt just like your customer would get it (box or folder) and see if they get the item as you want it to be. 

 

Also if you you set to give CONTENTS rather than a copy of a box with items in it you will have less to deal with.

 

 It does get easier but TESTING is really the best method  if the item is the least bit tricky.

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Always test stuff like this with an alt (or a very trusted confederate).

Just in passing, while weird, the "slam bit" behaviour is occasionally exaclty what is desired. Historically, it's probably just a side-effect of an implementation convenience, but still it has a sometimes intended effect.

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