Jump to content

Clue to live performers


KongWubba
 Share

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 2168 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

If you "have to" cough or clear your throat (PS if that's a frequent issue maybe you shouldn't be performing)............MUTE THE GD EFFING MIC. Or at LEAST make an effort to muffle it, turn your head, etc. It's amazing to me that this actually needs explained, but I'm running into it with a LOT of performers. It's insanely annoying and inconsiderate of your audience to do that, at such an amplified volume no less.

 

So please. Get a clue. Don't be a moron about this like so many others out there are; it could put you a step ahead of the competition. TIA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a small percentage of SL residents come to this forum so even fewer live performers will see your rant or even hear of it.  So you aren't accomplishing anything here.

Many performers in SL are not professionals, they are talented amateurs, living a dream in SL.  Most likely the performers that have done this didn't realize how harsh it sounds over their mic.  It would be much more constructive if you tell them politely how disconcerting it is.  Perhaps even suggest they keep a glass of lemon water handy and take a sip between songs to prevent an overly dry throat. 

While some are prima donnas most of them I've worked with over the years welcome constructive criticism if they are approached in the right way.  Do it without ranting like you did here.  If you don't want to tell them in person, write up a note card about it and drop it on them after their performance so you don't rattle them further during it. 

Once you let them know, if you continue to hear them do it, and it's so bothersome, then just don't patronize them anymore. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Amethyst Jetaime wrote:

Just a small percentage of SL residents come to this forum so even fewer live performers will see your rant or even hear of it.  So you aren't accomplishing anything here.

Many performers in SL are not professionals, they are talented 
and untalented
amateurs, living a dream in SL.  Most likely the performers that have done this didn't realize how harsh it sounds over their mic.  It would be
much
more constructive if you tell them
politely
how disconcerting it is.  Perhaps even suggest they keep a glass of lemon water handy and take a sip between songs to prevent an overly dry throat. 

While some are prima donnas most of them I've worked with over the years welcome constructive criticism if they are approached in the right way.  Do it without ranting like you did here.  If you don't want to tell them in person, write up a note card about it and drop it on them after their performance so you don't rattle them further during it. 

Once you let them know, if you continue to hear them do it, and it's so bothersome, then just don't patronize them anymore. 

FIFY :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put on live shows at my new sim, these people entertain for about 9 dollars a live show.... 
You could just go some where else or pay 300 a month for a sim,100s a week in adds in marketing hire people then tell them what you expect out of them...you have a sim with no entertainers... 
SL Live performers really put their self out there at their own cost with little return so jack offs like you can sit around and complain .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having been a professional singer/entertainer in RL, I can appreciate that SL entertainers "put themselves out there" BUT... they should put themselves out there to entertain people at all times through the performance, and coughing into the mic is the opposite of that. It should never be done unless it really can't be helped; i.e. one of those sudden coughs that take you by surprise and, even then, the mic should be turned off or covered almost instantly.  With a non-surpise cough, the very least that should done is to turn away and cover the mic to reduce the noise. There is no excuse for an entertainer to cought straight into, or too near, the mic - except maybe punk entertainers.

So, those who "put their self [sic] out there at their own cost with little return" really should do it right. The idea that 'it costs me to do this for you' is no excuse or reason whatsoever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A lot of this could be avoided, including untalented performers, if the venue owner would take the time to go see the performer perform before hiring them.  If that's not possible they should audition them before they allow them to appear at their venue. 

Unfortunately many venue owners will take any performer that will work for free or really cheap. Patrons can up the level of performers appearing at a venue if they tipped the club generously.  However most don't, they expect performers for free too or at most a tip to the performer.  You get what you pay for in my experience.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An addition to my previous post:

When I was a professional singer, I would occasionally get a tickly cough during a song - that's a cough that cannot be denied, and even breathing in is a liability. But I wouldn't let it out until the song was finished. It was hard, and I literally sweated getting through to the end of the song, and then I'd turn away to cough. But one cough doesn't clear a tickly variety, so, I explained to the people what was happening, and I took a break.

Each time it happened, the bar owners would ply me with iced water, honey and such, but none of it managed to clear a tickly cough. However, each time I took a break, it cleared, as if by magic. After a few times, I realised that it was smoking my pipe that cleared it - instantly. I don't smoke now, but I don't sing either so I don't have the problem. Those tickly coughs continued to attack me from time to time, forcing me to take a break, but I never coughed into or near to the mic. I sweated through it until the end of the song, often thinking that I'll never make it, but I always did.

Entertainers entertain, and coughing into or near the microphone is the opposite of entertaining. Nobody wants to hear it. Those who sing on a stage with other musicians have a great advantage, because they can turn and walk away from the mic to get rid of it while the music still plays, but those who are alone, whether on a stage or at home, can't do that so easily, but they can switch the mic off, or cover it and turn their head, and that's what they should always do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


KongWubba wrote:

If you "have to" cough or clear your throat (PS if that's a frequent issue maybe you shouldn't be performing)............MUTE THE GD EFFING MIC. Or at LEAST make an effort to muffle it, turn your head, etc. It's amazing to me that this actually needs explained, but I'm running into it with a LOT of performers. It's insanely annoying and inconsiderate of your audience to do that, at such an amplified volume no less.

 So please. Get a clue. Don't be a moron about this like so many others out there are; it could put you a step ahead of the competition. TIA.

Just for you I'm going to compose a symphony out of sampled coughs, shiffles, wheezes, grunts, groans, burps, belches, throat-clearing and maybe even a fart or two ;-P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 2168 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...