Jump to content

I hope SL is making lots of money off the ads!


Guest
 Share

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 3891 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts


Phil Deakins wrote:

It depends how much each advertiser is paying for the clicks. It could well be that sometimes LL gets more from your clicks than they would have got from their 10% share of something you would have bought in the marketplace on that visit.

 

...and if they get a % of the sale from these ads.... no wonder they use them. o.O

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 55
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Publishers don't get a % of sales via click-throughs. They sometimes get a fixed amount though. It's usually one or the other. An advertiser chooses to pay for click-throughs or for sales/sign-ups, but usually not both.

eBay (uk) once emailed me to offer £5 (~$8) for every sign-up they got via one of my sites. I put their ad on and got very little from it. An insurance broker paid me £4 per click-though from one my sites, and I got plenty from that ad. Mostly, it's cents rather than dollars though. I don't see the ads on this site but LL could be getting a lot more for click-throughs than just a few cents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was Google who threw him out of their AdSense programme and it looks like he was cheating. His messages to them sound like he's cheating too. The amount he said he was making isn't outlandish though.

There is a lot of money to be made from Google's AdSense (and from AdWords). I was earning at the rate of between $30,000 and $40,000 a year from AdSense. I let it slide quite a few years ago but I still get hundreds of $ each month from it. Some people make it a full time, well-paying, job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Phil Deakins wrote:

It was Google who threw him out of their AdSense programme and it looks like he was cheating. His messages to them sound like he's cheating too. The amount he said he was making isn't outlandish though.

There is a lot of money to be made from Google's AdSense (and from AdWords). I was earning at the rate of between $30,000 and $40,000 a year from AdSense. I let it slide quite a few years ago but I still get hundreds of $ each month from it. Some people make it a full time, well-paying, job.

No question in my mind that he was cheating.

I got really curious about his claims and did some digging back when he posted that thread. 

I was able to dig out so much information about who he really was and what he was doing it was nuts.  And it only took me about 15 minutes to do it.

He was 'self employed' and worked full time at gaming all the systems.  And was making a lot of money at it.  Somehow however he got it in his head that he was smarter than Google / Ad Sense.  And got himself busted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Phil Deakins wrote:

Publishers don't get a % of sales via click-throughs. They sometimes get a fixed amount though. It's usually one or the other. An advertiser chooses to pay for click-throughs or for sales/sign-ups, but usually not both.

eBay (uk) once emailed me to offer £5 (~$8) for every sign-up they got via one of my sites. I put their ad on and got very little from it. An insurance broker paid me £4 per click-though from one my sites, and I got plenty from that ad. Mostly, it's cents rather than dollars though. I don't see the ads on this site but LL could be getting a lot more for click-throughs than just a few cents.

I wonder what happens when I click but don't buy right away. I save the item in my favs or search for it using google and buy it at a later date... do they still get anything off that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Perrie Juran wrote:

I don't doubt there is a lot of money to be made with the ads and click throughs and everything else associated with this.

While some of us found his claims a little fantastic, I could not see any reason why he would have inflated the numbers in this thread:


Someone has to be making some money or why go through so much trouble to make all these ads?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on whether or not the advertiser pays on clicks or on sales/sign-ups.

If they pay for clicks, the affiliate/publisher (LL) will get money just because you clicked on the ad, regardless of whether or not you buy anything.

If they pay for sales/sign-ups, and you save the destination page in your favourites, LL's affiliate ID will be part of the page's URL and, when you open the page again, LL will get money if you buy something.

If they pay on sales/sign-ups and you don't buy/sign-up at the time or via your favourites, but you only back to the site via another route, such as a search engine, then the affiliate (LL) gets nothing.

 

Note 1: Doing multiple clicks in a relatively short space of time won't cause LL to get a payment for each click. The ad system companies, in this case Google, have systems in place to handle that sort of thing.

Note 2: I may have made a mistake earlier when I said that publishers (affiliates) don't get a percentage of sales. On reflection, maybe they do. It's been quite a few years since was involved in it and my memory is known for being less than perfect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You seem to be interested in it, so here's some information for you that may or may not interest you.

Google started this type of advertising with what they called AdWords. The other engines saw that finally a search was making real money, which was something new, so they followed suit. AdWords are the ads you see with the search results. On the results pages, they are on the right side and at the top with a cream background. I see that there are also some Wajam ads above those at the top but I'm out of touch and I don't know what they are.

Advertisers pay for clicks on the AdWords ads. The way that some people make a lot of money from is by taking out AdWords ads themselves. They do it in this way. They find AdWords fields in which advertisers pay a lot of money per click, and then they'll take lower cost AdWords ads out in the same field. Sometimes their ads will get clicks and the user will be sent to a page of more Google ads - ads of the companies that pay a lot per click. So, when the user clicks on one of those ads, the arbitrager will get a large amount for the click. They'll pay Google a smaller amount for the click on their own low cost ad, and the difference is the profit. It's called arbitraging. That's how some people make a very good living from AdWords. It sound a bit underhanded but Google were well aware of it pretty much from the start and, the last I heard, they were happy enough with it because users got to where they wanted to go, albeit with an extra page in between.

Then Google expanded their advertising system and got website owners to host the ads. That's AdSense, and it's the system that's used on LL's websites. Here again, some people use it to make a lot of money by hosting the ads but going further with them. They make a lot of small MFA (Made For AdSense) websites for the ads and seo them up the search engines' rankings. The sites often contain interesting text, of course, and suitable inbound links are organised, all of which helps them up the rankings, but they are there solely to get clicks on the AdSense ads.

For people who want to make good money from those systems, the opportunities are there, but it does take ongoing time to keep abreast of changes that are always happening.

 

I made a lot of money from AdSense ads on my sites but that was because my sites were already at or near the top of the search engine results for lots of searchterms.and got a lot of traffic. I didn't need to keep at it and follow all the changes. I didn't make any MFA sites.

I also made some money in a similar way to arbitraging but I didn't keep at it for long because it was necessary to be at it much of the time. I used a small UK engine that only produced advertisers' result - the results were all pay-per-click ads. I got into the gambling sites field where the advertisers were competing on price per click on a hourly basis. They'd work their way up to around £30 per click (that's about $50 per click) and then drop down again, only to start the cycle over again.

I was an affiliate for engine so I got money for clicks that were done on my site. I also took out low cost ads for one of the top few sites that were competing like that. My ads advertised the one I'd chosen and was still on the first results page but lower down. The difference in cost per click was huge. When someone clicked on one of my ads, the user came to my site, but they never actually saw it. On receiving the click-through on my ad in the engine's results, the back end of my site did an auto-search in the same engine and it received the results. From the results it picked the result for the gambling site that I'd chosen and did an auto-click on it.

So the engine got the full amount for the click from the gambling site plus the small amount from the click on my ad, I, as an affiliate, got my share of what the gambling site paid the engine, and the user got to the site s/he wanted to go to without seeing anything in between. Everyone was a winner :)

I cleared the method with the engine so it was all above board. But it did take ongoing time to keep up with things so I only did it for a short time. I much preferred to just set things up and then sit back and leave it to earn money. It was good fun though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had no idea people took these ads so seriously, I just thought it was fun to shop. Tonight I think I had a mistake though... I let my Virus Protection clean up my computer and tracking cookies and now I am getting random ads I don't like much. When LL started this ad thing there use to be a little black "x" in the corner of the ad where I could block that ad if I did not like it. I don't see it now. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was going to ask you where the Xs that you clicked on were but then I saw one. There are at least 3 versions of the top right corners and only one version has the X. I've no idea if you can finely tune the ads you get any more without Xs on all of them. You can click the top right to go to a Google page and tailor the sort of ads you get though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe don't have to log in. If you just set things as you want them and leave or close the page, your changes should remain - stored in a cookie.

I did that yesterday without logging in, and then I went back to see if the change I made was still there, and it was. It didn't know what language I wanted so I set it to English and closed the page. I then clicked on another ad to get the page again and the change was still there - stored in a cookie. The next time I see ads I'll go to the page again to check if the change is still there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keli. In an earlier long post (on the previous page) I mentioned the Wajam ads on Google's results pages, and I said that I'm out of touch so I didn't know what they were. I've just discovered what they are. Wajam is a non-malicious system that's snuck onto my computer as a browser add-on. It changed pages to include ads. I've removed it now. I thought I'd mention it in case you come across it.

I discovered that in the process of removing my ad blocking for a different reason, so now I'll be able to check if the change I made still exists - when I see a top-right corner of an ad that will take me to that page again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Phil Deakins wrote:

Keli. In an earlier long post (on the previous page) I mentioned the Wajam ads on Google's results pages, and I said that I'm out of touch so I didn't know what they were. I've just discovered what they are. Wajam is a non-malicious system that's snuck onto my computer as a browser add-on. It changed pages to include ads. I've removed it now. I thought I'd mention it in case you come across it.

I discovered that in the process of removing my ad blocking for a different reason, so now I'll be able to check if the change I made still exists - when I see a top-right corner of an ad that will take me to that page again.

Some of these ads seem dangerous to me. I get warnings from my Virus Software and my Phone that some of these ads are dangerous. I don't understand why LL would let them be used.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Keli Kyrie wrote:

 

Some of these ads seem dangerous to me. I get warnings from my Virus Software and my Phone that some of these ads are dangerous. I don't understand why LL would let them be used.


For the same reason that most crimes are committed. There's money in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Awe Thor wrote:


Keli Kyrie wrote:

 

Some of these ads seem dangerous to me. I get warnings from my Virus Software and my Phone that some of these ads are dangerous. I don't understand why LL would let them be used.


For the same reason that most crimes are committed. There's money in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't get any warnings about any of them.

LL doesn't choose the ads. Google's AdSense system does.

By "non-malicious", I meant that it's not a virus, it won't hurt anything, or anything like that. It will have arrived in my computer with an update to something and not just by visiting a malicious webpage.

Oh. And the Andrews Sisters were wrong. Money is not the root of all evil. The *love* of money is :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Phil Deakins wrote:

LL doesn't choose the ads. Google's AdSense system does.

Am I right in thinking LL could choose the ads?

Like not accepting ads that directly compete with their service, or those particularly deceitful 'Download Now!' ads that try to look like a part of the secondlife.com website (those are nasty, I had to stop recommending a TPV because their domain was covered in those ads, misleading everyone).

I have seen malicious ads on secondlife.com - I've also seen evidence that they can spring pop-ups and message boxes.

If you use content filtering, examples are available here.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 3891 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...