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Light Bleed Inside Reflection Probe


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Hello, I am stood in an enclosed rectangular space with a reflection Probe filling the volume. There are no lights, it should be dark. My problem is I keep seeing light bleeding in along some edges. Why is this happening and how do I stop it? Thankyou.

Light_Bleed_001.thumb.png.f5e3643bd15df1d3804b2445872ec65b.png

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It turns out this image was taken in a sandbox that had some sort of atmospheric fog effect in the environment which I am guessing is what caused both the light bleed and the extreme level of darkness shown. I’ve tried and failed to replicate the problem on the Beta Grid and in other sandboxes on Agni and it is now working as expected.

 

The last time I was active in SL we were using Windlight. I’ve been reading about the EEP and I want to test how it works in relation to  PBR materials as I'm relatively clueless. I assume in order to access the environmental settings I need to own or rent land. Back near the start of SL I used to own a parcel on the beta grid that persisted for years but it seems to be gone now.

 

Is there any way to buy land temporarily on the beta grid? If not, can I just buy a small parcel on the mainland in order to get access to EEP or are environments controlled at a region level or something?

Thanks for any advice you might have.

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We're all new to this, but this is my take.  The reflection probe defaults to a sphere.  You can change it to a box but that is irrelevant.  What it reflects is still a sphere.  So leave it as such and make the sphere large enough to cover the entire build.  I build houses, and I'm working on my first PBR house.  This is how it seems to work.

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3 minutes ago, Cooter Coorara said:

You can change it to a box but that is irrelevant.  What it reflects is still a sphere.

This is incorrect. The probe type influnces the projection and sampling of the reflection map, but it doesn't change the object that's showing the refleciton. So if you're viewing the reflection on a chrome ball, then the box and sphere probe types will look very similar. But on a planar (i.e. flat) chrome surface (a "mirror" of sorts) you can easily see the difference in projection types.

5 minutes ago, Cooter Coorara said:

So leave it as such and make the sphere large enough to cover the entire build

.. No - probe in each room is how you're meant to be doing it, as you'll then get correct reflections and lighting on objects in each room. This becomes especially apparent when viewed in a nighttime setting where lighting has a much more obvious effect.

Generally for interior scenes, unless you've got a massive room, you'll want to use a single box probe for the room.

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20 hours ago, Cooter Coorara said:

We're all new to this, but this is my take.  The reflection probe defaults to a sphere.  You can change it to a box but that is irrelevant.  What it reflects is still a sphere.  So leave it as such and make the sphere large enough to cover the entire build.  I build houses, and I'm working on my first PBR house.  This is how it seems to work.

 

On the first day of testing Reflection Probes I tried placing one large probe over a whole PBR house and it didn’t work. At first I thought it was working (when viewed from a distance) because I was able to reduce some of the blue sky color which was reflecting on the materials which made them look nicer and more accurate. However once I got in close the reflections were not accurate at all. Reflections were being captured from outside the walls and from adjacent rooms etc.

I’ve tested more since then and learned that the reflection probe creates a volume. It is from the center of this volume that an image is taken of its surroundings which is then used to generate the reflection and ambiance effects. So there would need to be a reflection probe (or multiple probes) in each room or space within the building in order to achieve accurate reflections and ambient light bouncing.

Edited by Porky Gorky
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