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Blender Cloth Physics


Ford Lusch
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Hi,

I've followed some tutorials on using the cloth physics and made some nice cushions, drapes, towels etc. However I cannot find a way to make then optimal for sl and always end up at least 7 LI or more. Is this tool practical for sl or do these things have to be made by hand. Does anyone have any tutorials on either using the physics with sl, or creating something like a drape by hand in Blender?

Thanks for any help.

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Just now, Ford Lusch said:

Hi,

I've followed some tutorials on using the cloth physics and made some nice cushions, drapes, towels etc. However I cannot find a way to make then optimal for sl and always end up at least 7 LI or more. Is this tool practical for sl or do these things have to be made by hand. Does anyone have any tutorials on either using the physics with sl, or creating something like a drape by hand in Blender?

Thanks for any help.

Mesh made with "cloth physics" in a 3D modeling program are no different from "hand-made" mesh. Once uploaded to SL, they are static.

The only difference might be that the mesh generated by "cloth physics" can be dense, as in lots of triangles. Before you upload things to SL, you should simplify the model and remove any unnecessary triangles, like those that can't be seen (under the object) or faces that don't contribute to the detail of the mesh (like on flat surfaces or slight angles).

You'd probably want to make the LODs by hand, especially the lowest ones. Look at the other recent threads in this subforum, it's been talked about a lot.

Your physics shape (while you're uploading the mesh to SL) should be as simple as possible, such as a plain cube.

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First of all you can use cloth physics convincingly without making your cloth SO dense that you can't really see the quads (yes, many tutorials show you some really REALLY dense stuff).  So experiment with cloth physics parameters (there are some presets) and see how many divisions you need to make.

 

Once you get your fabric looking good, you can DECIMATE it using a modifier.  Watch carefully to the point that it starts breaking apart. IF you have areas that are not draping, then certainly get rid of all the extra edge loops that you can before decimating.   Once you decimate you may need to reconnect some edges (if you have those and your mesh is double sided). That may entail adding extra vertices to meld. It can be a painstaking process.  :D.

 

It does work and it does look good and you CAN make some items that are low poly and hold their LODs.  It takes time though. 

 

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