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what does x y z mean on sceond life


hotgirl2006
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It is a vector that is used to describe something in world.  It could be position, the size of a prim, the rotation of the prim, or the color of the prim, depending on the context.  If you click on a prim and go to EDIT then the OBJECT tab, you will see the three different versions of the vector.   Builders use these to place prims accurately where they are supposed to go.

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It is a vector that is used to describe something in world.  It could be position, the size of a prim, the rotation of the prim, or the color of the prim, depending on the context.  If you click on a prim and go to EDIT then the OBJECT tab, you will see the three different versions of the vector.   Builders use these to place prims accurately where they are supposed to go.

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Amethyst is spot on...

Additional information can be found here:

https://community.secondlife.com/t5/English-Knowledge-Base/Build-Tools/ta-p/700039

Here is a part of the available information just to tease yu.

Editing prims

Use the Build window to move, resize, rotate and otherwise manipulate inworld objects.

KBtip.png Tip: Checking Snap to grid in the Build window forces you to position objects on an arbitrary grid. This is helpful in making sure that objects line up correctly and are precisely spaced.

The video tutorial below discusses working with the building grid, which is useful for precision in building. Topics include:

  • Turning on the grid
  • Adjusting grid increments
  • Adjusting grid snap-to increments
  • Altering grid length
  • Snapping objects to the grid

Moving

  1. Right-click an object and select Edit. This opens the Build window to the Object tab.
  2. Choose Move to enable the Position function.
  3. Click and drag the red/green/blue axes on an object to move it around.
  4. Clicking on the red (X), green (Y), and blue (Z) arrows lets you drag the object only along those axes.

Rotating

  1. Right-clilck an object and select Edit.
  2. Choose Rotate in the Build window to bring up the rotation sphere.
  3. Click and drag anywhere within the sphere to rotate the object freely along all three axes.
  4. Click and drag a specific ring (red/green/blue) to rotate the object only around that axis.

Resizing

  1. Right-clilck an object and select Edit.
  2. Choose Stretch from the Build window to bring up the sizing box.
  3. Click and drag one of the white corner boxes to scale the entire object proportionally.
  4. Click and drag a red, green or blue box to re-size a prim's length, width or height (respectively) without changing the other dimensions.
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From the Wiki: "When you are logged in, the top center of the screen will tell you your current map region (they all have unique names), and the X (east), Y (north), and Z (height) location within the region, in meters."  In other words, exactly where you are in a named region in Second Life.

Each region (sim) in Second Life is 256 m x 256 m. The X and Y distance is measured from the south west corner of each region. The Z distance is measured up from the base of the grid (which is usually below the terrain or sea floor).

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One common way to define positions and directions is to use Cartesian coordinates; that is, to describe them in reference to three perpendicular axes.  You can think of them as FORWARD, SIDEWAYS, and UP or as NORTH, EAST, and UP, or simply as X, Y, and Z.  If I'm giving directions from one place to another, I can say, "Go forward 1 mile, right for another mile, and then UP 300 feet."  If I'm describing a box, I can say, "It's 2 meters long, 1 meter wide, and half a meter tall."  If I'm trying to describe either of those in tight mathematical language, I'd describe them with a vector, <X, Y, Z>, that does exactly the same thing.  The X, Y, and Z are the distances that I'd have to measure in those three perpendicular directions to get where I want to go or to describe the shape of some object.  That's true in SL and in RL.

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