Theresa Tennyson

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About Theresa Tennyson

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  1. Pedo Hunter

    Better watch out - they're cracking down on that too.
  2. Vote for Net Neutrality

    As for me, I'd be fascinated to see your source for this statement.
  3. Vote for Net Neutrality

    Hmmm... maybe because what you "taught" me was laughably wrong, as the portion of my post that "wasn't worth replying to" explained?
  4. Vote for Net Neutrality

    Here's what I really said: This "network of computers connected by cables" simply doesn't exist, except as an idea. The computers and cables are independent. As an old geek, over the years I've connected to the "internet" over lines intended for voice telephony (if we stretch definitions, even by using an acoustic-coupling modem connected to a teletype, as my avatar blushes and hides her face), lines intended for cable television service, etc. The physical internet only exists to serve the idea of connected computers. The hardware itself constantly changes. It's like a river. At any given time there will be water in that river; however, the exact water in that river at any given time will be different from the water the day before and the day after. The water doesn't make the river - if you suck up the water into a tank truck you don't own the river, only that water. The river existed before and after independent of that water. The Internet existed before any of the hardware that it's currently running on, and before any of the current ISP's existed as ISP'S -- by pure logic, because if there was no IS to P there would be no need for an ISP. In fact, as the articles you yourself linked to pointed out, the Internet existed on publicly owned, non commercial networks before there was any commercial involvement. Now here's what you actually said: You are mistaken. The internet exists as hardware - cables and connections. Good luck accessing the internet without the express permission of those who own that hardware. The protocols you mention are not the internet. They facilitate uses of the internet's hardware, but they are not the internet. The internet is the hardware, which is not publically owned and, therefore, nobody has an intrinsic right to use it. It sure looks like you're saying "the river is the water", doesn't it?l ETA: Found the exact moment you jumped into the briar patch. Let's be clear about this. Nobody has a right, human or otherwise, to access the internet. It's as black and white as that, and there are no shades of grey in between. The reality of the internet is that it consists of hardware that is owned by people. Mostly it is owned by individuals like us. That's our computers. When they are connected, they are part of the internet. But what makes it a network (the internet) are cables and connection points (ISPs), and those are owned by companies that are in it for profit. The internet cannot work without them. They are what make it a network. None of us have a right to use their equipment, unless they give us that right. It is definitely not a 'human right'. As has been pointed out several times, the Internet existed and worked without the cables and connections owned by companies that are in it for a profit for years. Those cables and connections and the companies that run them exist only because there was a reason for them to be installed - the Internet, which is independent of them. It would run pizz-poor without them right now, yes, but they could be replaced. It's Atlas Shrugged in reverse, basically.
  5. Vote for Net Neutrality

    True/false quiz: 1) The Internet uses the same hardware now that it did in 1995. (T/F) 2) The Internet uses the same concept now that it did in 1995 (T/F)
  6. Vote for Net Neutrality

    But the article it links to does: The four Network Access Points (NAPs) were defined under the U.S. National Information Infrastructure (NII) document as transitional data communications facilities at which Network Service Providers (NSPs) would exchange traffic, in replacement of the publicly financed NSFNET Internet backbone.[1]
  7. Vote for Net Neutrality

    That's what I thought.
  8. Vote for Net Neutrality

  9. Vote for Net Neutrality

  10. Vote for Net Neutrality

    They might lease all of it - in fact that's highly likely if you have more options for service than physical wires entering your house. And even if they own the wires there's very little chance that they own the land that they go over or under - that's probably public land. What I'm arguing is that the backbone of the internet is much more complicated than John Galt with a post-hole digger and a cable reel connecting you to sweet, sweet Free Enterprise.
  11. Vote for Net Neutrality

    But your ISP doesn't necessarily own the infrastructure they're using - in fact, for connecting to something like Second Life they own at best a small fraction of it. It's possible that they own none of it at all. And it's also very possible that some or all of the infrastructure they're using was never originally intended to be used for Internet data - that's why I mentioned cable television. In many places in the United States internet service is provided over cables originally laid for television service.
  12. Vote for Net Neutrality

    We're talking about the wires, the preshus, preshus wires that were your obsession a few posts ago.
  13. Vote for Net Neutrality

    Hold on just a ding-dong minute -- most European telcos are at best privatized former government services, and in the United States the phone system was a government-sanctioned monopoly for decades. As far as cable television, I remember that the city of Detroit gave one company a franchise to wire the city.
  14. Vote for Net Neutrality

    This "network of computers connected by cables" simply doesn't exist, except as an idea. The computers and cables are independent. As an old geek, over the years I've connected to the "internet" over lines intended for voice telephony (if we stretch definitions, even by using an acoustic-coupling modem connected to a teletype, as my avatar blushes and hides her face), lines intended for cable television service, etc. The physical internet only exists to serve the idea of connected computers. The hardware itself constantly changes. Meanwhile, here's a little story about how things were when the service providers had complete control over the use of their lines: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2008/06/carterfone-40-years/
  15. Vote for Net Neutrality

    And, of course, nobody is paying for Internet access at all now. Oh, wait...