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16 wrote:


Phil Deakins wrote:

We stopped using shillings a very long time ago
;)

You can be Kenyan though. They use shillings there
:)

oh! ok

I could be a Kenyan. they can run really fast. like antelopes. i could be happy to be like that. in SL have to run away really fast sometimes to escape them orbs (:

+

didn't know that you not have shillings anymore. is a pity that. bc they quite cool names. like tuppence hapenny. florin. thrippence. half crown and that

is fun to think about. like half crown. like who has the other half? like where did it go? what happens if i find it. can i glue them together and stick on my head. and like what do you do if you meet up with the person who has the other half and they wont give it to you (:

and my other fav. bob. like you in a shop. and ask: how much is that? and they say: one bob. and you go hmm! and start look round the shop at the other people. and when find a Bob then say: come over here. and they say; why? and you say: bc i want trade you for this thing. jejejejejee (:

 

If the crown is cut in half horizontally and if the band is wide enough, both halves could still be wearable. As the top of most crowns is the fancy part, it should find favor with the ladies. The gents could take the lower half, which they would not wear for fear of catching it on a bolt under their high horsepower horseless carriage while changing the oil. For both parties the half crown would be too large to lose down the garbage disposal, sparing us from another tired television trope.

ETA: I'd want to run a bit faster than an antelope (read "faster than an eagle")...

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:



If the crown is cut in half horizontally and if the band is wide enough, both halves could still be wearable. As the top of most crowns is the fancy part, it should find favor with the ladies. The gents could take the lower half, which they would not wear for fear of catching it on a bolt under their high horsepower horseless carriage while changing the oil. For both parties the half crown would be too large to lose down the garbage disposal, sparing us from another tired television trope.

ETA: I'd want to run a bit faster than an antelope (read "faster than an eagle")...

 

yes that be quite good. I be happy to have the top half

I think that guys tho maybe will not wear their bottom half of the crown bc like someone will say: hey!!! what that on your head??? and the guy will say: is my half crown

and the other dude will say: no is not! you ringhead !!!

(:

+

also now I seen evil eagle then if I ever turn into a antelope. am going to carry a big sharp long stick in my mouth. and when evil eagle comes swooping down out the sky am going jump round at the last minute and stake him right down his greedy mouth. and then I will just carry on trotting along with it stuck on my stick

and if I came across some lions and they look like they want to eat me then I say: Hi! wanna buy a chikken. is half-price ok. bc I not had time to pluck it yet

jejejeje (:

 

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Dillon Levenque wrote:

 

16 wrote:

thanks. is quite sad that all those cool names been lost. they was invented over 100s of years. and now all gone

USA got cool names as well for their money. nickels and dimes and quarters and singles etc

is way better than what we got. 10c 20c 50c $1 $2. boring (:

Ahh, well then let me twist the cutlass. You don't hear it much these days but two bits was once a common synonym for a quarter (aka a 25 cent piece). You almost never hear anyone call a half (aka fifty-cent piece) four bits anymore but that happens occasionally too.

Both are leftover terms from the 18th century, when the Spanish Dollar was the preferred coin of trade, even in the American colonies and later in the U.S, mostly because the silver content was consistently excellent thanks to all the silver Spain mined in Mexico and other colonies. That coin was also called the peso de ocho, worth eight Spanish reales. It was not unknown for the coins to be physically divided into eight pieces (bits), as the silver in each piece was equal to that of a real.

Our coinage nomenclature has roots on the Spanish Main :-). Arrr.

 

edited to fix the incorrect spelling of 'occasionally' yet again.

I heard that expression before on some movies. like I not give two bits. I knew it had something to do with money but never knew was Spanish origin. is really interesting how all kinds of different things end up in the common language. and what the history background is of them  

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