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Found 13 results

  1. This week we are talking to Fly Kugin, who plays both her own mesmerizing violin compositions, as well as cover tunes, in Second Life. Music is a huge part of Fly’s life; in the physical world Fly works as a professional musician and music teacher in Istanbul, Turkey. In SL, she reports that she performs “solo shows, dual streams, benefit shows for non-profits all around the grid and recently produced an exhibition of {my} own real life art in SL.” Initially, Fly was unaware of the possibilities for musical performances in SL. She tells us: “I explored Second Life for about four years and participated in social and cultural activities to improve my English. Then I realized... Why am I not bringing my profession of music to Second Life?” Fly’s performances in SL were even more prolific over the last year, given the circumstances. She played several live shows per week throughout 2020. She was eager to bring her art to people across the world, saying “sharing these feelings with people around the world gives me great energy and happiness.” Fly adds, “the effects of music on human psychology have been scientifically proven. That's why I can clearly say that Second Life is a great platform to touch people in profound ways.” There is actually a chance to witness her perform tomorrow at the Musical Concert for Virtual Ability, which takes place from 12:30PM to 3:00PM. The opportunities to experience art, culture, and music in SL are truly limitless and we encourage all to come explore! Video Production Credits: Draxtor Despres Shot at The Rose Theatre
  2. This week's featured musician is Al Hofmann, whose one-man band has treated us to a fusion of rock, jazz, and electronic elements for 14 years. With over 3,000 inworld shows under his belt, his style has no doubt evolved time and time again and each performance brings fresh interpretations. Please check out his official website and YouTube channel to experience his music for yourself! Q: When/how did you hear about Second Life? A: I heard about Second Life in the summer of 2006 on a local tv program about new conceptual art tendencies. Q: What instruments do you play, and at what age did you pick them up? A: I play the guitar: electric, acoustic, classical and midi guitar. With the midi guitar, you can play any instrument sound with it. MIDI is an acronym that stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. It's a way to connect devices that make and control sounds (such as synthesizers, samplers, and computers) so that they can communicate with each other using MIDI messages. {I also play} bass guitar, percussion and charango, an ancient South American {stringed instrument}, kind of mandolin. I started to play the guitar at the age of 5. Q: How would you describe your music? A: The style I play is being defined as fusion. A mix of different styles, mainly jazz and rock. Q: Tell us about some of the musicians who have been the most influential to you. A: John Mclaughlin, Jeff Beck, Chick Corea, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Weather Report, etc. Q: How has your relationship to music and creativity been affected by the pandemic, and what would you say to inspire other artists during this time? A: The positive side of the pandemic is that you have time to fully embrace what you do. Whatever that might be, you can improve what you love to do the most. A wonderful opportunity to even discover the purpose of your life. I strongly believe there is art in every individual. Life and humans are an act of art. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: The most meaningful aspect of the SL music community is planetary conscience. No more borders, languages, political implications, time frames. One love: Art on the planet. SL has given us all a terrific chance to connect with artists and people around the world. Thank you, Al! If you or somebody you know would like to submit content to be featured in Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  3. Photo Credit: Kissmy Spicoli This week's featured artist is Jed Luckless, who has been providing us with upbeat and improvisational guitar jams since 2009! With over 600 shows under his belt, his immense music archive is filled with enough tunes to get you through the rest of winter and then some. Please check out his website as well as his YouTube channel. He also has some great videos of inworld performances: Nantucket Yacht Club, The Cave, & Hippiestock. Q: When/how did you hear about Second Life? A: I first became aware of Second Life in 2009. I heard there was a live music scene happening there. At the time I was playing in a Grateful Dead cover band, and I was honing my skills on that music so I wanted someplace I could recreate the complete Dead show experience. I did a search in Second Life for Grateful Dead and stumbled upon a {region} called DarkStar, which had a complete recreation of the Dead’s stage setup, and I knew I had found my place. That was my home for many years and I played a lot of shows there. After a while, I branched out into playing more of my original music. Q: Your music draws from a variety of styles, what subgenres do you think would be appropriate to describe it as? A: My style really is all over the place, which likely comes from being exposed to all kinds of music by my parents, from classical to jazz to showtunes. My own musical tastes gravitated initially toward hard, classic rock, like Led Zeppelin, then later progressive rock like Genesis, and eventually jam band music, which is typically how I describe myself now: jam band inspired, which reflects the large amount of improvisational jamming I do at my shows. Q: How many years have you been playing guitar, and how did you get into it? A: I picked up guitar around age 15. I think it all started with the Partridge Family. I wanted to be Keith Partridge and I loved the idea of driving around in a bus playing music. An early love for guitar heavy rock bands like Kiss, Aerosmith and AC/DC also propelled me to pick up the six-string. Q: Tell us about some of the musicians who had an influence on your style. A: I mentioned a few of them already, but not the biggest one which is Phish. Not too many people even know who Phish is, but they have such an eclectic mix of styles in their music and that’s what first drew me in. It might surprise people to know that I first saw Phish live in 1992 and have seen hundreds of their shows over the past 30 years. They do a lot of improvisational jamming too. My tours and shows in Second Life are very much patterned after the way Phish and The Grateful Dead do it, with a run of shows set up around a theme like “Winter Tour 2021” and stops at various venues across the grid over a few weeks or months. The concerts themselves are typically a two-set format with a setbreak. Q: Do you have to adjust any effects like distortion, whammy bar, pedals, etc. while streaming in a way that is different from a performance in the physical world? A: I would say that if anything, I have to change the way I perform in the physical world to replicate what I do in Second Life, since that is where I have really developed my act and my sound. When playing in Second Life, I use in-ear monitors and an on-stage mixer that allows me to put drums, keys and other instruments through my looper to create a kind of one-man band. It’s really hard to do that on a physical stage with the typical amps and monitors that a bar or club has set up. In Second Life we also have an amazing particle light show by Moondance Parx. If only we could make that work in the real world! Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: I think the answer is right there in your question. Community. The group of fans and friends that come to the shows and the interaction I have with them and they have with each other is really what it’s all about for me. It’s very similar to the vibe of a Dead or Phish show, and that’s the goal. It’s not just about the music, it’s about the scene. That’s why we have a set break, so people can socialize and connect. I totally love that I’ve been able to build a community around my original music and I couldn’t have done that without Second Life. But my shows are only as good as the energy the crowd brings to them. The more connected we all are the more the circuit hums and the more likely it is to be an electric experience for everyone. Thank you, Jed! If you or someone you know would like to submit content for Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  4. Photo provided by Fly Kugin This week's featured artist is Fly Kugin, an immensely talented violin player who injects a classical flair to jazz, rock, pop, and music from all over the world. She enjoys both solo performances as well as dual-streams with many talented SL performers. For more information and to hear her music, check out her official website and SoundCloud Q: When/how did you hear about Second Life? A: I discovered Second Life five and a half years ago. I had a new laptop and was searching for games. I discovered an advertisement on the internet about Second Life, so I downloaded the viewer and created an account. It happened by accident via the internet. Q: At what age did you start playing violin, and do you play any other instruments? A: I was at a fine arts high school when I started playing the violin and have been playing since then. At the same time I also started playing the piano. In addition to the violin and the piano, I can also play the flute and the ukulele. Q: Are there any aspects of playing the violin that are specific to this instrument and not found in other string instruments? A: I was at high school when I started playing the piano and violin, as I stated above, and in the beginning the violin was harder for me to play than the piano. This is because I had experience with the piano in middle school. I had a small keyboard and was playing melodies and the piano was initially my first musical passion. At the beginning of my professional classical music education in high school, my main instrument was the violin and everyone in my class had to play the piano. I still loved to play the piano at the time, as I was more familiar with the violin, but one cannot get the sounds as easily on the violin than on the piano. But my high school violin teacher started to give me very emotional pieces to play. An example of such a piece is Pietry Illyric Tchaikovski's "G Minor Canzonetta." This particular classical piece went straight to my heart and was so emotional. After this, I started to practice the violin more. Within four years I realized my violin skills had improved very much. I applied to university with the violin as my piece for the entrance exam to the music program, and I passed! At this point, the violin was my main passion. In music I really cannot compare any instrument, but I was wrong because you have to be patient with instruments. I was not patience with the violin, so in the beginning the piano was my main piece and I practiced it more. I believe that there is no instrument that is harder than any other: all instruments can be played if you have time, patience, and are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to learn the instrument. Q: What are some of your favorite songs to cover on the violin? A: There are too many to count and name! But there are a few that I feel really passionate about. These pieces are: Lara Fabian's "Je T'aime," Queen's "Show Must Go On," Tomaso Albinoni's "Adagio," and Lucio Dalla's "Caruso." I am always adding new covers, but I cannot ever stop playing these four pieces. Q: Tell us about your creative process as it pertains to instrumental music, like how you convey ideas and feelings without words. A: This is hard to explain, as it is about feeling. For example, if the song is about losing someone, I put myself into the song so to speak and I think about a time when I have lost someone and put that emotion into playing that particular piece. If the song is a funny song, I remember a time when I was having fun as a child and put that particular feeling. My feelings are reflected with my violin fingers when playing. Music is a reflection of feeling, so the audience will feel the pieces as well. If I feel happy I will play happy music, If I am sad then the music I am playing is sad. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: For me the most meaningful aspect of the SL community is the music. Because music is life for me. Music is the place or object where I realize I am real when I am in Second Life. Music makes me feel so alive. I could make music in any location or in any time zone, but Second Life provides a great opportunity for me to share my music to strangers and friends who are around the world. This is important because there are so many people around the world who have different perspectives about music, so getting appreciation from many people from different backgrounds and cultures gives me confidence and makes me very happy. Thank you, Flyqueen! If you or someone you know would like to submit content for Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  5. (Photo courtesy of Phemie Garfield) This week's featured artist is Phemie Garfield, whose earnest and uplifting blend of folk and indie rock will energize the start of your week. Please check out her music here. Q: When and how did you hear about Second Life? A: I heard about Second Life on New Year's Day at the dinner table with my family. My brother asked me if I'd heard of it and how it's not a game but a world where you can just socialize with people and create things, and there was live music, which made me so curious to check it out! Q: Some of your songs come to a really powerful crescendo, is that of particular symbolic value to you? A: That is a really interesting question! Yes, I think I've always been a fan of dynamics and expression and power in music. When I'm writing music there is a cathartic release of emotion. I feel things very deeply and sometimes talking about it is so uncomfortable, but with music I can express it safely. It's like riding a wave and that crescendo is probably my way of riding that wave of anger or passion or sadness or hurt or joy. I've always loved anthemic rock, like U2 for example. Q: How did you first become interested in playing music? A: It really started in high school after a few years of devouring records that my big brother would play for me and listening to my dad's old vinyls that I would sing to in my bedroom. I started piano in 5th grade and learned how to sight read very quickly, and then in college learned acoustic guitar. Once I graduated college, I moved home and somehow started jamming with a friend and then it turned into a rock band that I sang in for four years. We toured regionally and I loved every second of it. Q: What instruments do you play, and do you have any favorite models? A: I play piano and guitar. I think it's fair to say that Tori Amos was a big influence especially with how she wrote piano. Vocally my role models are Joni Mitchell, Tori Amos, Bono, and Sia. Q: Tell us about some musicians and/or artists that have influenced your style. A: Bono and U2 were a huge influence on me. He had this passionate soaring voice that just carried you into another dimension. They were heartfelt and something felt so true and authentic about his voice. Tori's Amos' style was delicate and yet strong, deep but accessible. Her music is beautiful yet when you read some of her lyrics they are edgy, dark, and full of pain, and you can tell she was working out some deep stuff. Joni MItchell... Well, she was just a goddess genius of lyricism and melody. Her voice was warm and could move you, and her melodies were so imaginative. All these people taught me that it isn't enough to just sing, you have to give yourself... It has to come from deep within. The music has to come from your heart and you can't be afraid. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music scene to you? A: The SL music community is one of the most accepting and welcoming communities around. If you have an original to throw out there, they welcome it. If you aren't the best singer in the world but you have heart and you give your time to people, they will come and listen and they will stay the whole hour. It's just wonderful to see. People love to hear a live performer just giving their all and they give budding musicians a chance to be heard and to practice their skills. Also, hearing from people who IM me and say things like, you really helped me through my night, or you really made me feel something is so awesome. To know people from around the world are listening! That is so cool. Thank you, Phemie! If you or somebody you know would like to submit content for Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  6. (photo courtesy of Gabriel Nyoki) Bringing us hard rock from Porto, Portugal, this week's featured artist is Gabryel Nyoki, who comes from generations of musicians. His foray into playing music started with playing covers until he amassed a loyal following, who then asked to hear more of his original songs. He is now creating and recording music as part of a power-trio and has gone on RL tours in the UK and Europe! He has an abundance of online sources to hear his music: Official website: www.gabrieldasilvamusic.com VEVO YouTube Q: When and how did you hear about Second Life? A: A magazine around 2007. I only joined later when I bought a faster computer. Q: Your bio on your website says that you come from a family of musicians. Are there any similarities between your musical style and theirs? A: My father's father built and played almost all instruments all by himself. Most of my family, my uncles, aunts, and cousins play and sing a variety of genres, but not rock. My father was dedicated to electric guitar so eventually I dedicated myself to hard rock, my favorite, although I have over 3,000 gigs in different genres and instruments. Q: Your music is incredibly polished and well-produced. It's clear that you've been honing your craft for a while. Could you tell us about the brands/models of instruments you use and why you prefer them? A: What I use is humble, I am an electronics and IT engineer and experienced a long curve of courses both in music theory and music production, bringing the best I can out of each to my own flavor. I have two electric guitars, a steel acoustic, a nylon acoustic, one rock bass guitar, two Yamaha keyboards, a vintage drum set, and I invest a lot in the digital audio world inside Apple products. My main guitar and the one heard in my latest album is actually a PRS made of paper! Q: You've signed with an agency and have toured in the UK and Europe. Did you have to cancel any real world shows due to COVID? And has the pandemic affected your ability to practice with your band members? A: Yes and yes. All plans were canceled. Q: You hail from Porto, Portugal. Do you feel that Portuguese rock has any characteristics that differ from rock music in other cultures? A: In some genres yes, not in rock, no. And my music is 99% in English as we tour in different continents and not specifically for Portuguese people. Portuguese people enjoy international rock a lot! Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: Being able to connect directly with different people around the globe so fast. I share and learn so much, and that is priceless. Everyday I extend my fan base through rock fans around the globe with Second Life, and I love delivering them good vibes and entertainment. We have over 10k fans in SL. Please take a look at his calendar for upcoming Second Life concerts. He suggests the Solarwinds Music Concert as it is moderate. More of his content can be found here: Facebook SL Facebook RL Music video Flickr SL Twitter: @gabrieldamusic Instagram: gabrieldasilvamusic Thank you, Gabryel! If you or someone you know would like to submit content for Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  7. (Photo courtesy of Juel Resistance) This week’s featured artist is Juel Resistance (you may know her as Suzen Juel), whose creative output consists of soulful music as well as dreamy visual art. Please visit her Spotify and this awesome RL video of her playing music. We hope you check out her calendar to catch her live inword! She posts some amazing photos in a variety of styles on Flickr, and more information can be found on her website. If you’d like to experience some of her artwork inworld, head on over to Altered. Q: When and how did you hear about Second Life? A: I was playing an online game with a friend called The Sims Online. He told me to check out Second Life, so I did. I created Juel Edison and explored the vast spaces and just couldn't figure out what to make of it. While I was exploring I met another friend that I kept in touch with and eventually I just lost interest. In 2005 my SL friend said, “JUEL, COME BACK, there is live music in SL now!” I told him he was full of s*** haaa, and I came back as… well, me. Q: What instruments do you play, and how did you first become interested in music? A: I had a thing for the organ at my grandma's house when I was about 4ish. It had all those fun bossa nova, samba, cymbals sounds, so I'd putz around on it, playing what I would hear on the radio. Mom would sometimes play it with me, she had taken lessons when she was young. I lost interest… at about 13 I found a guitar in my grandparents’ attic, a tiny one. I ran downstairs: “PAPA!” He smiled and said, “I made that the year you were born, it's yours… go play it!” I loved that guitar and I was going to learn it… so I got some books and taught myself for a while, eventually taking lessons until my guitar teacher asked me to sing and play “Delta Dawn.” I slowly packed up my little guitar, walked home, and never went back. I was mortified. SING? I'm NOT going to SING in FRONT of YOU! OMG! That was that. I really haven't put it down since. I also have a ukulele that I love, but I don't really play it as much. I dabble around on harmonica and also have my mom's banjo, which I would like to learn as well. Oh, and I whistle, that's important too! Q: The painter Wassily Kandinsky was known to experience synesthesia and expressed hearing music as he painted, associating colors with distinct musical notes. As a visual artist, do you ever feel that your paintings are informed by your music, or vice versa? A: It's interesting that you bring up this question! When I was a preteen or so, I would listen to music, what kid didn't, right? My mom had come into my room and asked what I was doing. So I said without hesitation, "I'm drawing the sounds: this is the bass, this is the drum, this is the guitar," She just said, “Ok… interesting.” I didn't find out until many years later that this is synesthesia. It has had a profound impact on my art and music. I often paint in what I'm seeing or hearing from music with a good bass line, like trip hop. It's full of vibrant imagination to me. My own music doesn't really make me see colors, more shapes...closing my eyes when I perform is like a putting up the big screen theater, haha. Q: While there have been many incredible female Blues and Americana figures, the mainstream image of the "greats" of these genres is predominantly men. Please share some underrated female musicians that you feel we should know about. A: I'm a sucker for female songwriters. Lucinda Williams tells some soulful stories in her lyrics. She's relatable, she gets it. Holly Williams. Mary Gauthier. Rory Block. Beth Hart. They all have serious soul, edge, and guts. Q: A huge obstacle to gender equality in the arts is the notion that many see female/non-binary experiences as only interesting to them, but male experiences as universal. Do you try to make your work universally appealing, or do you aim for a niche audience? A: I do quirky little cartoon drawings called 'inkies.' They can have curly hair or long hair and they always have a shirt on. Someone once asked why they are all female and I said, “Nooo, they aren't, they are gender neutral.” And as I'm grinning, I realized that no one has ever questioned this before in my inkies. As far as music goes, I write what I write and hope someone else finds it relatable, I hope someone feels something. I hope people find a little release, be it funny or sad or any other emotion. I tend not to create things to be universally appealing, it's quite personal and very much a niche audience. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: That we are a global community all in one little world called Second Life. We are music and art driven, we support each other with all the unique gifts we have. It's a great community that I fall more and more in love with every time. Thank you, Juel. Keep it up!
  8. (Photo courtesy of Nina Setner) This week’s featured artist is Nina Setner, an incredibly talented singer with a broad range: jazz, cabaret, vintage and current pop/R&B, musical theater, and opera. She is a lifelong lover of music and has studied vocal performance in university, record stores, and beyond. Her music can be found on her YouTube channel, as well as SoundCloud. Q: When and how did you find out about Second Life? A: I'm an oldie in SL--I'm coming up on my 13th rez day this October, which seems particularly insane to me. Back in 2007, my life changed radically because I'd had my first child earlier that year. Going out with the girls had been replaced with staying home with the baby, so all of a sudden I found myself without much of a social outlet. One night we happened to be watching a now ancient episode of CSI with a storyline in which SL featured, I was intrigued, and here I am--though to be fair, I would say that in addition to the life-changing relationships I've made along the way, it's the music first and foremost that has kept me here. It has always been my touchstone, in both lives. Q: You sing in a wide variety of styles, two of which are jazz and cabaret. For people unfamiliar with these genres, how would you describe the difference? A: Oh wow, great question--I'll do my best! In the simplest terms possible, jazz is a musical style, and cabaret is a performance style. Jazz requires a lot of imagination and willingness to experiment and be fluid with rhythm, time signature, melody--but often within a pretty strict framework. In order to excel at it, I think you have to be brave and give into the process. You can't scat sing or improvise 8 bars timidly--you have to go in with your whole heart. Cabaret on the other hand is a more intimate performance setting, as opposed to a larger theater or arena, etc. It can be free form (on the piano bar end) or it can be scripted ahead of time in a more formal cabaret club, but in both settings, singers are enjoying a rapport and a connection with their audience, either by telling them a story through songs they've chosen ahead of time or engaging with them off the cuff. Cabaret singers commit hundreds--thousands, actually--of songs to memory, because in a setting like that, you need to be ready and able to sing requests from multiple genres, jazz certainly being one of them. Q: You mentioned that you are a mother. How do you balance your creative outlets with raising kids, and do they like music as well? A: I was a regular in the club circuit here in Chicagoland where I reside in the days before I had my kids. When I stumbled into SL, I had NO clue about the live music community or potential opportunity to continue performing at a high level, but thankfully I found out pretty quickly. While they were little, I had to keep my schedule incredibly light--one, maybe two shows a week tops. As they've gotten older and can entertain themselves for an hour (though everyone who follows me regularly has heard my kids in the background *far* more often than I'd like over the years!), I've been able to increase that show load. My kids are young musicians as well, but neither of them enjoy singing. Apparently they're “too shy.” I keep hoping that'll magically change one day. Fingers crossed! Q: When books are adapted into films, there are always purists who say the source material was better. Has there been a film adaptation of a musical that you feel should only be experienced live in the theater? A: Another fantastic question. I think musicals that are more on the visual spectacle end--for example, The Lion King--I think that those are best appreciated live and in person. It's difficult to transfer the director's vision to the screen in those circumstances. I'm also a bit of a Sondheim fanatic/purist, so while I've been really happy to see his work getting the wide exposure and recognition it deserves through film adaptations of Into the Woods and Sweeney Todd, nothing takes the place of seeing Sondheim done as Sondheim intended. On the flip side, some musicals transfer brilliantly--the film version of West Side Story is still, for me, the one to beat. I have yet to see a live performance of it (or any other movie musical) that I liked more. Q: Did you study music or are you self-trained? A: At this point, it feels like I've been studying it my whole life. I started playing piano as a young kid and added voice lessons to the mix during my early teen years. Those piano lessons really helped shape my ear and broaden my repertoire beyond what I even understood at the time (I was playing Hoagy Carmichael's "Stardust" and songs like it back in high school out of random piano collections I'd pick up at the local music store--who knew I'd still be singing those songs 30 years later?) I did study music in college--I went to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and hold degrees in both choral music education and vocal performance, and I'm still studying today--that never stops! Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: So, so many things. What SL and the music community in particular have added to my life and work as a musician is sort of incalculable. But I think reaching out over thousands of miles, making those connections and sharing your art and your passion with people you never would have had the opportunity to meet otherwise? I think that's pretty damn special. I hope we're here for years to come. Thank you so much, Nina! Don’t forget to check out her calendar for upcoming performances, and her group in SL. If you or someone you know would like to sign up to be featured in Music Mondays, please fill out this form. For more information, take a look at our official announcement.
  9. Image provided by Amforte This week's featured artist is Amforte, whose dedication to music started when she was a child, growing more potent with time as she became familiar with various styles. This singer songwriter is not afraid to bare her soul, and her music is an energetic and comforting reminder that there is always someone who can relate to what you're feeling. Please check out her official website to listen to her music and see what's she's been up to! Below are some links to follow her inworld. AMFORTE (AMFORTE Clarity):: secondlife:///app/agent/16f3fc26-7d2b-4e89-9de2-0cd96303df2d/about SL Music Group secondlife:///app/group/6e7b8cdc-46a2-6ccd-dd97-f15423689378/about Q: When/how did you hear about Second Life? A: I heard about Second Life from a friend who was already performing online. It wasn't long before I signed up and started performing. This was all back in December of 2008. Q: How did you start playing music? A: I was eight years old when I begged my father to let me take piano lessons. Years later, I picked up a guitar and started to learn how to play and write music. I have never turned my back on music ever since. I started performing in SL as a guitar player and vocalist and never actually played the piano for 12 years until recently. I introduced piano to my concerts and haven't stopped. Q: Who are some of your favorite musicians? A: There are so many bands/musicians that are my favorite, but these are some of them: Radiohead, Billie Eilish, Coldplay, U2, The Verve, Garbage, Alanis, Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Cranberries, and many more! I don't just like one genre of music. I listen, love and sing to country, rhythm & blues, pop, rock, edm, jazz, blues, and I don't stop there. Music is my life. It moves me and it's my therapy. Q: Tell us about one of your best songwriting moments. A: To me, emotion has a lot to do with songwriting. I have to feel something. I remember a few years ago, I experienced such heartbreak, and ended up writing a song in a matter of minutes. My emotions took over and I ended up writing one of my best songs. Q: Do you have a favorite SL venue for performing? A: All of the venues that I have performed in within SL have been amazing. Although I've had to cut my schedule down a lot, I will still be writing music and performing in SL. I have been working on my second album that should be released in December 2020, or early January 2021. I am also working on a couple of film projects: one is a web series called GHOST SLAPPED that will be out sometime early in 2021, and the other will be a short film (and perhaps my first feature film) later in 2021. Anyone interested can follow these projects or my music in the links shared here. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: The most meaningful aspect of SL to me is reaching out to the community and sharing my music with the world, virtually. There is a community here that relates to my music, and some find comfort in it. Thank you, Amforte! Here are some more links to her projects. AMFORTE MUSIC RL LINKS: Subscribe: www.REVERBNATION.com/AMFORTE Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AMFORTEMUSIC Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amforte/?hl=en AMFORTE FILM PROJECTS: www.GHOSTSLAPPED.com If you or anybody you know would like to submit content for Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  10. Photo courtesy of Mavenn Resident This week's featured artist is Mavenn Resident, who imbues familiar songs of intimacy and romance with an unrestrained passion that can be both soft and powerful. She pulls from a range of styles, and you'll hear everything from ballads to folk and some blues rock. Please check out her music here. Q: When/how did you hear about Second Life? A: I had been on another chat program previously when a musician friend of mine mentioned he was going to start performing in Second Life. He asked if we would be interested in following him into the program and checking it out. There were several of us and within weeks we were running our own venue, and hosting incredible artists. Q: What got you into music, and do you play any instruments in addition to singing? A: I have always been an avid music listener and just casually sang, school performances, and was in a band for a short period as a teenager. I was always singing along to the radio enough to drive my children mad. I was involved in school orchestra growing up and played the oboe. It wasn’t until I was in Second life for about a year that I began to sing in any kind of regular way. Now singing is so much a part of my life, I wouldn’t want to live without it. Q: Who are some of your favorite musicians? A: My favorite musical inspirations are David Bowie, Janis Joplin, Nina Simone, and of course, Beth Hart. Q: What advice would you give to other musicians who feel frustrated by the restrictions of our current circumstances? A: This is a perfect time for both observation of the zeitgeist and self-discovery; keep living in your art, and be thankful weed is more widely available. Q: What is your favorite memory of performing in Second Life? A: My first show in Second life was at a venue built much like a regular brickhouse pub. Optimus Prime tp’d in and couldn’t fit inside the Pub so he sat outside on the lawn to listen and the chat hilarity ensued with the audience. That’s when I knew I loved the camaraderie and inclusive nature of the platform. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: I absolutely love getting to know the other artists by having so much access to them. Having your regular favorites perform so regularly allows you to watch them grow in their art. I adore being an audience member with my audience as well. The scene is a fascinating and thriving community SCENE when you take the time to observe and get to know the people, free your soul and drift away. Thank you, Mavenn! If you or anybody you know would like to be featured in Music Mondays, please fill out this form.
  11. (photo courtesy of Mike00 Carnell) This week’s featured artist is Mike00 Carnell, bringing us rock music with an infusion of upbeat blues guitar from Hamburg, Germany. For his performances in Second Life, he is usually accompanied by Henrietta the goat, pictured above. (She also has a RL counterpart.) Check out his SoundCloud for some fun bops to start your week with! Q: How and when did you hear about Second Life? A: A friend from Skype told me about SL in 2007 and after a few weeks I decided to create an account. Her name is Amelle Loon. Q: What instruments do you play and what brands/models do you prefer? A: My main instrument is the guitar. At the SL music jams I also play bass and cachon/drums or percussion. The main brands for guitars I use are Fender, Gibson, Taylor and Martin and for amps Fender, Marshall and Roland (RL use). Q: Your SoundCloud says you live in Germany. Can you tell us about some cool German musicians that people in other countries might not know about? A: I’ve been to SL music jams or meetups in Germany, Netherlands, England, and USA, and I have met a lot of great musicians at all of them. The ones from Germany are Aminus Writer, Lani Aboma, Wolem Wobbit, Mark Taylor, Edy Rau and more. By now I call them all RL friends. Q: I remember hearing "Without You" by Harry Nilsson and how much I loved it, and then my mind was blown even more when I heard "Si no estas tu," the Spanish version. Have you ever had a moment like that? How many languages do you sing in? A: I know the feeling of suddenly hearing a song you know in another language. My preferred language for songs is English for some reason. In SL I sing in English and German. Some people are kinda surprised to hear songs in German in SL, which makes me smile. Q: Tell us about the most memorable show you've played or seen in SL. A: The most memorable shows are always the dual (greetings to KevinMThomas Carpool) or multi-streaming shows when you interact with one (or up to three) other musician(s) to create a full band live sound. It is so much fun and also challenging to all jam together. Q: What is the most meaningful part of the SL music community to you? A: The most meaningful part of the SL music community is that people from all over the world are connected together, and due to the time zones you can listen to live music almost 24/7. You can listen to all kinds of music, many languages, and accents. Especially these days, it’s very nice to have SL live music, you can still play gigs or listen to other musicians, being around people without risking anything. Thanks so much, Mike00! If you or somebody you know would like to be featured in Music Mondays, please fill out this form. Wait times on hearing a response will vary, as we have received an enthusiastic response from many talented musicians (to our delight, of course!).
  12. Pictured above: Holly Giles at ~No Strings~ This week's featured artist is Holly Giles (pronounced 'Jiles'), a smooth crooner with an eclectic style hailing from Australia. She likes to sing country, rock, and pop from classic to contemporary and can be found at her venue ~No Strings~ each Tuesday and Saturday at 8pm SLT. (slurl for venue: http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Areumdeuli/226/27/80) Please check out her music on her website as well as this video. Q: When/how did you hear about Second Life? A: In 2011 I joined an online chat platform called IMVU due to some personal stuff that forced me to be at home and unable to work. I ended up staying for 5 years. I heard about SL from some people at IMVU who were trying to convert some of us over, haha. I created an SL account in 2015 and kinda used both IMVU and SL for about a year until I decided that SL was more to my liking, with people around my own age. I was in SL for about 2 years before I even KNEW there was a Live Music Community lol, so once i discovered that, I gave away my IMVU account to a friend and I have never looked back. Q: I really enjoyed your renditions of classic country songs. What drew you to that genre? A: My music is actually very mixed genre, with country music only taking up about one third of my song list. I was raised on classic country music with my mum having her own band in my childhood, so I learnt my love of country from her and I always say that classic country is my soul music lol. But I do love all music so I tend to sing what I love, from classic country, classic rock, 90's pop and country, through to modern pop like Lady Gaga. Q: As with any artistic style, country music has evolved so much over the last century. Which decade/era is your favourite, and why? A: Oh that's easy. I love the old country. The Merle Haggard, Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn era of country. These country legends are like storytellers. Every song has a story. Every song has a purpose to it. I don't know how else to explain it. I can have my heart broken and find my story in a classic country song. I can feel overjoyed about something and find my happiness echoed in a classic country song. While I love all music and listen to even the most modernist of pop music, I personally just don't get that feeling from it. I get the happiness of an awesome beat, or well-written lyrics but yeah, not that feeling. Q: If you could open for any musician (alive or deceased), who would it be? A:I think a lot of people who follow my music would expect me to say Dolly Parton right now, and I thought I would too, but you know, I think I would LOVE to open for Bette Midler. Wow, what a musician she is. I think if I opened for Bette Midler, I could sing anything I wanted to before she took the stage. I could sing some James Brown, followed by a Dolly Parton song, followed by some Creedence lol. I wouldn’t be restricted to one genre, like I would be if I opened for Dolly, I feel. Q: Do you ever get stage fright before performing in SL? Describe your preshow ritual. A: OMG. I only started singing, I mean really singing in Second Life AND real life 2 years ago. The reason I never sang before is that I suffered MASSIVE stage fright. I would freeze up and my voice would go shaky if I tried to sing in front of anyone. It took a lot of help and compliments from online friends for me to get the courage to sing in Second Life. My very first show I was so nervous that I felt sick. But by halfway through I suddenly forgot that I was nervous and I just sang. I found the talking part a lot harder than the singing part lol. Now, I don't feel any nerves in Second Life, but am working on my nerves in RL lol. Q: What is the most meaningful aspect of the SL music community to you? A: Without a doubt, the part I enjoy the most is singing a song and seeing in local things like “OMG I love this song!” or "Oh wow, I haven't heard this song in years!” I love getting requests, I love sharing my love of music with others. I love talking about how my mum used to sing this song or that song in her band while I slept under tables at the local pub. I love that 2 years ago I couldn't sing this song or that song, but that now with some practice under my belt, I can blast that song out like it's nothing. I love just being able to sing and the fact that people want to hear me sing still blows me away every time I open my mouth. Thank you, Holly!
  13. Hello!, I have been helping people performing in SecondLife for 7 years and After being asked a LOT about this tool in the last months, I've finally made it public. As a Real Life musician on international tours and music producer (you can google me to know more about me as my bio is not important on this post), I take my music professionally RL and SL. If you take your SecondLife performances seriously (or know someone that do) this is for YOU. The options are limitless, take your singing/playing performances to the next level and get closer to your fans. Click the following link to get your hands on it, gift it or share it with your favorite performer: s: http://bit.ly/Virtualperformer Best, Gabriel da Silva
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