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JosephWayseeker

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About JosephWayseeker

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  1. The comment about Apple support of NVIDIA cards not being supported on macOS is incorrect. Apple Technical notes list several NVIDIA cards compatible with older machines at https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208898. These are for macOS 10.14 (Mojave) and so are also Metal compatible. “These specific third-party graphics cards are Metal-capable and compatible with macOS Mojave on Mac Pro (Mid 2010) and Mac Pro (Mid 2012): MSI Gaming Radeon RX 560 128-bit 4GB GDRR5 SAPPHIRE Radeon PULSE RX 580 8GB GDDR5 SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7950 Mac Edition NVIDIA Quadro K5000 for Mac NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 Mac Edition Some other third-party graphics cards* based on the following AMD GPU families might also be compatible with macOS Mojave on Mac Pro (Mid 2010) and Mac Pro (Mid 2012): AMD Radeon RX 560 AMD Radeon RX 570 AMD Radeon RX 580 AMD Radeon Pro WX 7100 AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 AMD Radeon Pro WX 9100 AMD Radeon Frontier Edition” Technical Note HT208544 discusses eGPUs. These external GPUs are compatible with any Thunderbolt 3-equipped Mac. They accelerate apps that use Metal, OpenGL, and OpenCL. This info is from https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208544. You can do searches of more specific information by searching at https://support.apple.com or a Google or other search engine for user group testing for other machines, etc. Perhaps the confusion about NVIDIA support is due to this in the second technical report “Aftermarket GPU drivers delivered by third parties are not compatible with macOS.” in that they have not been tested for support of all the uses that the GPU is used for in macOS such as “accelerating the user interface, providing support for advanced display features, rendering 3D graphics for pro software and games, processing photos and videos, driving powerful GPU compute features, and accelerating machine learning tasks.” and the multiple security layers for making it difficult to penetrate to the OS software and especially, the kernel. I hope this helps Mac users. P.S. I forgot to mention that applications also can decide whether they will use a specific GPU. I have never encountered an app that refused to run with my GPU but applications that choose not to use the native frameworks environment but their own graphics environment (resulting in slower performance, lack of support features such as spell and grammar checking, service extensions, cut and paste in multiple formats transparently, and many more capabilities) are often frustrating as they could have retained their UX as the native graphics and other interface items could have retained integration, and performance benefits of the OS.
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