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Red lines I have no idea what they mean, but result in errors on upload


BonBun Paperdoll
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Ok, so, managed to find a program that I can actualy use (Blender is basicly unusable without takeing some collage course in how to use it, in my opinion), and have been working on makeing some mesh objects by way of practice. The program Im useing (Hexagon) does not have a direct export to collada, so I am exporting to obj, then useing another program to convert to collada (Zbrush mostly, less sucessful results with Blender so far). I've done a few meshes that have turned out just fine. However, I have finished detailing one such mesh, and upon trying to upload, Im suddenly getting an error I didnt before.

In the preview window, when I go to preview the physics for it, some of the edges on the model show up as red lines, and then when I go to upload it, I get an error saying "mesh failed to upload: Multiple errors while validating asset. NewAgentInventory_InvalidAsset. See log file for details."

Doesnt tell me what or where the log file is, or what the error is about, or what is causeing the red lines. This has been happening for two days now. Has anyone else run into this and knows what's causeing it and how to fix it? Incase it's relevant, Im useing the mesh compatable version of Phoenix. RedLines_001.jpg

EDIT: Also, the last two steps under the 'Physics' tab are all greyed out, so I am unable to adjust any of these to see if they help solve the issue.

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I am not 100% sure about that, but as far as i know, the red lines indicate collapsed triangles or very small traingles at least. These collapsed faces are extremely bad for the physics calculation and are indicated as red so you know where to dig in your physics mesh...

Regarding Blender i believe strongly that the biggest problem with that program is that it does not adress newbies needs. You mostly need a lot of beforehand knowledge so you can find your way through the enourmous functionality. And many tutorials on the web follow this route and do actually not take the newbie by hand and send them into the right direction :(

But Blender as it stand is (in my opinion) an awesome program as soon as you "get how it works".

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Well, I have a feeling Im going to have to atleast learn parts of Blender, since LL has pushed everything to meshes it seems.

As for the tiny triangle, that's going to take some doing to fish out I think. Hexagon does not apply triangles itself, just faces, edges, and vertices. It's likely the conversion to collada in ZBrush or Blender that's adding a triangle where it honestly shouldnt be. I dont suppose anyone knows of an automated way to reduce and remove tiny triangles like that?

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Just a gentle nudge for you (you are only just beginning with mesh, so I won't flood you with information)... for future builds, try to keep your meshes as simple as possible WHILE getting the shapes you want. It will help a lot with general Land Impact costs for starters, plus in general, a simple mesh is MUCH easier to work with than an overly complicated one with tons of vertices and polygons. Remember, that you can always ADD IN extra polygon details if you need to later, once you get a general shape worked out - but keep polygon counts as low as possible at all times for best SL performance.

Unfortunately with your current mesh... you will most likely have to find those errant triangles by hand... Keep in mind that if you have already UV-mapped and material mapped your mesh, that removing vertices will possibly mess them up.

Hexagon CAN convert quads to triangles, but it's inefficient for SL usage since it only splits each quad face into FOUR triangles as far as I know (which is far too expensive). What I do is to export my mesh to Blender as an OBJ file (when I have finished shaping my model), and while in Blender, I simply RE-EXPORT it as a new OBJ file, using the convert to triangles option in the export window. This step neatly converts the quad mesh to triangles - with each quad face divided into TWO triangles (half the triangle count compared to Hexagon). I then re-import this new OBJ file back into Hexagon to continue working (UV mapping and material mapping etc). Not a perfect workflow, but quick enough, and sure faster than manually splitting each quad by hand. If any triangles need tweaking or redoing, it's a simple process within Hexagon.

(When re-importing back into Hexagon, just keep an eye on the scaling measurements - depending on each program's preferences, sizes might change during the import and export stages. A few quick changes in the mesh dimensions palette in Hexagon can fix this easily though).

Also, Blender is handy for converting your finalised Hexagon mesh (as an OBJ file) to a SL compatible DAE file ready for uploading.

:matte-motes-smile:

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