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Carole Franizzi

Real-life Witches. A Bewitching Alternative Life-style.

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Carole Franizzi wrote:


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAHHAHAHHAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!! *EVIL CACKLING*

Serves you right for stealing my man!!!! Just thank your lucky stars I didn't transform you into a badger. They're soooo not sexy.....

Do you want your man back Carole???? ....:matte-motes-big-grin-evil: *meows*

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Griffin Ceawlin wrote:


Mayalily wrote:

In real life I am a fairy.


As I revealed in a different thread yesterday... me, too!

You wear flowers in your hair in real, too?  Let's see the pics.  I want evidence! 

There are no male fairies.  You are an elf.  Silly men.  If you want to be of the order of Fae, you will have to cut your family jewels off as there are no expections to the order of Fae. 

There are no male witches either.  Male witches are called Warlocks.  Again, silly men. 

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Mayalily wrote:

There are no male fairies.


I beg your pardon? I know what I am! Please provide concrete evidence for your statement.

 


There are no male witches either.  Male witches are called Warlocks.

The term warlock in origin means "traitor, oathbreaker". In early modern Scots, the word came to be used as the male equivalent of witch (which could in origin be male or female, ...

and

The term warlock is actually a misnomer and has been readily applied to the male-practicing witch. The word, warlock came from the 14th century and is a way to describe a man who practices black magic.

 

ETA: No male fairies. Ha, I say! http://www.salon.com/2010/04/28/disney_boy_fairies/singleton/

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Griffin Ceawlin wrote:


Mayalily wrote:

There are no male fairies.


I beg your pardon? I know what I am! Please provide concrete evidence for your statement.

 

There are no male witches either.  Male witches are called Warlocks.

The term
warlock
in origin means "traitor, oathbreaker". In early modern Scots, the word came to be used as the male equivalent of witch (which could in origin be male or female, ...

and

The term warlock is actually a misnomer and has been readily applied to the male-practicing witch. The word, warlock came from the 14th century and is a way to describe a man who practices black magic.

 

ETA: No male fairies. Ha, I say!


That picture of Tinker Bill looks like an elf with wings.  I rest my case.  lol

As far as warlocks, oh.  But, there are not men allowed in covens, not that I know of.  So, how can thar be male witches if they aren't allowed in covens to my knowledge?  However, there are always exceptions, such as they can cook. 

However, in real life, the fairy form of dress comes not only with a lot of glitter but with a lot of flowers and butterflies, but especially a lot of flowers; flowers in your hair, in your earrings, in your necklaces, in your dresses, in your shoes, everywhere.  Fairy dress is a form of gothic dress and is a description of a style of dress such as preppy or athleisure. 

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Mayalily wrote:

That picture of Tinker Bill looks like an elf with wings.


Hmmm. I asked for concrete evidence, not badly drawn boy fairies presented as same.

 


As far as warlocks, oh.  But, there are not men allowed in covens, not that I know of.

Some covens are limited to males or females only, others are specifically for gay Pagans, and some are for families and married couples and exclude single members.

In Gardnerian Wicca, covens are as much as possible composed of male/female pairs for balance.

 

 

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Griffin Ceawlin wrote:


Mayalily wrote:

That picture of Tinker Bill looks like an elf with wings.


Hmmm. I asked for concrete evidence, not badly drawn boy fairies presented as same.

 

As far as warlocks, oh.  But, there are not men allowed in covens, not that I know of.

Some covens are limited to males or females only, others are specifically for gay Pagans, and some are for families and married couples and exclude single members.

In Gardnerian Wicca,
covens are as much as possible composed of male/female pairs for balance.

 

 

Oh, well see I'm not really Wiccan, but I find that logical and fair.

As far as men wanting to dress the fairy style in real life, I have no problem with that.  I have seen these unisex type of t-shirts that are sort of tie dyed in very rich, dark colors with roses or other flowers in them.  Those look cool on a guy.   I like those t-shirts on both men and women.  Perhaps I should consider designing a fairy line of clothing for men?  There is some that is cool, but it not well know yet. 

ETA:  I think men might look cool in rich toned tied dyed butterfly t-shirts as well. 

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Ancient and venerable is the alter of Freya....Fair are her daughters...wise in the ways of weird are they. Mighty too is Odin...9 days and nights he hung from the tree...pieced by his own spear....wise in rune-knowledge he became. I clothe myself in a cloak of Ravens feathers...I lie in a river submerged to the neck...a heavy stone placed on my chest...Poetry issues forth from my mouth....I sing of my people...our wanderings...our hunts...our victories and defeats...I am a spear for throwing...I am the glint in the eye of a wolf...I am a harp for plucking..I am the thought that dies on the lips, for want of word-cunning.. That is all.

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Mayalily wrote:


Griffin Ceawlin wrote:


Mayalily wrote:

In real life I am a fairy.


As I revealed in a different thread yesterday... me, too!

You wear flowers in your hair in real, too?  Let's see the pics.  I want evidence! 

There are no male fairies.  You are an elf.  Silly men.  If you want to be of the order of Fae, you will have to cut your family jewels off as there are no expections to the order of Fae. 

There are no male witches either.  Male witches are called Warlocks.  Again, silly men. 

Sure there are male fairies... they're all over the place where I live.  You want picks?  Just look up Southern Decadence in Google Images.

Also, calling a male witch a warlock is considered an insult in some circles.  Maybe you should stick with what you know before you go off being offensive to people.

...Dres

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Void Singer wrote:


Mayalily wrote:

[...] There are no male fairies. [...]

Wouldn't poor Oberon be so sad to here this...

Alternatively he could be a reference to Freyr or Ing, who is the traditional 'King of the Elves' in Germanic mythology.[2]

[edit] French heroic song

The name Oberon got its literary start in the first half of the 13th century from the fairy dwarf Oberon that helps the hero in the chanson de geste, titled Les Prouesses et faitz du noble Huon de Bordeaux. When Huon, son of Seguin count of Bordeaux, passed through the forest where he lives, he was warned against Oberon by a hermit, but his courtesy had him answer Oberon's greetings, and so gain his aid in his quest: having killed Charlot, the Emperor's son, in self-defense, Huon must visit the court of the amir of Babylon and perform various feats to win a pardon, and only with Oberon's aid does he succeed.

This elf appears dwarfish in height, though very handsome; he explains that at his christening, an offended fairy cursed him to the height (an example of the wicked fairy godmother folklore motif), but relented and as compensation gave him great beauty. As Alberich features as a dwarf in the Nibelungen, the dwarfish height was thus explained.[3]

 

The Wikipedia about Oberon talks about him being an elf or a drawf elf also.

Anyhow, I'm talking about the modern form of fairy dress which is an offshot of the gothic and emo movement in dress which involves the wearing of flowered clothing and jewelry, whispy fabrics, fairy style glitter, but especially flowers everywhere.  Oh, and lots of butterflies and dragonflies, plus there are fairy skirts.  There are some unisex shirts I do recall, but the women's is cut a little differently, and the men's are sleeveless in style.  

@ Griffin, I don't see too many man (actually) none at all dressed in ferns where I live, but I like the look for SL and RL.  That kind of looks like a wood nymph though also. 

 

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You can dress like a fairy all you want, that doesn't make you a fairy.  I, on the other, don't have to dress like a fairy to be a fairy.

...Dres *hopes it sinks in this time*

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there are men that ascribe to that form of dress... I used to work at a bar where it was common... although like Dres, the clothes weren't necessary

PS
the goth version of the style is commonly known as "glitter goth", although oddly it seems to have more punk roots than gothic ones (fashion wise)

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Ian Undercroft wrote:

 

/me splutters. There are no male faeries?! So I've been wasting my time and money carefully cultivating such a look?

 

Undercroft54.jpg

 

I'm crestfallen!

 

Oh, Jeez, Ian. You're nearly as ugly as me in a frock. Only, your legs are better...dammit....

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Orfeu Miles wrote:

Ancient and venerable is the alter of Freya....Fair are her daughters...wise in the ways of weird are they. Mighty too is Odin...9 days and nights he hung from the tree...pieced by his own spear....wise in rune-knowledge he became. I clothe myself in a cloak of Ravens feathers...I lie in a river submerged to the neck...a heavy stone placed on my chest...Poetry issues forth from my mouth....I sing of my people...our wanderings...our hunts...our victories and defeats...I am a spear for throwing...I am the glint in the eye of a wolf...I am a harp for plucking..I am the thought that dies on the lips, for want of word-cunning.. That is all.

Hailsa Orfeu. Hail Freyja!

Venerable and ancient indeed is the altar of Vanadís, erected in the shadow of the Würm, when the great beasts yet roamed the far North, beneath the Aurora. Fair indeed are Hnoss and Gersemi, treasures are they, and wise they are in the mysteries of Seiðr and of Wiccrǣft.

Wise is the All Father, all knowing his wife Frigga, and mighty his son, red-beared Ása-Þórr, hammerer  of trolls. Preeminent are they among the Ásir! ... Forget not, however, from whom wise Óðinn received instruction in the ways of Seiðr. Wise is he indeed to have sought from Her this lore.

I cloak myself in the feathers of the gyrfalcon, and rise above Bifröst to ride the winds of heaven and travel the Nine Worlds at will. In salmon form I outswim the otter. In rushing water is my voice heard, singing of the great deeds of honor and of heroism, in the name of my noble ancestors. I am the cat that springs. I am the mouse that dies. I am the midnight sun. I am the waning moon. I am the sow in heat.

It is sufficient.

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Mayalily wrote:



...

There are no male fairies.  You are an elf.  Silly men.  If you want to be of the order of Fae, you will have to cut your family jewels off as there are no expections to the order of Fae. 

There are no male witches either.  Male witches are called Warlocks.  Again, silly men. 

You know, I wasn't going to post here anymore, where the corporate overlords censor us and may ban us for mentioning taboo topics. I've moved on to SLUninverse. But... I just can't let this go unanswered.

Of course there are male Witches. There are a few Dianic covens that are female only but they are the exception not the rule. By the same token, there are all male covens of the Faery tradition. In the US it may be spelled Fairy. Rumor is that these covens are comprised of gay men but I don't really know. The vast majority of covens and traditions seek a balance between Goddess and God aspects, between Yin and Yang. Emphasis upon one aspect is legitimate but is dangerous. The great Dianic priestesses realize this and handle it well. I suppose this is also true of the learned priests of Fey. Less experienced or less wise practicioners can upset balance and then there is trouble that the Grandmothers must fix.

There are both female and male Witches in my mom's coven. Mom is always High Priestess (even with her leg in a cast! heeee :P) but various men, my husband among them, serve in the role of priest for various rituals and at various times of the year. In winter, especially, the role of the priest of the Antlered (not horned) God is predominant. Sometimes mom has a trainee High Priestess called the "Maiden" (altho she may well be a wife and mother) who takes on her role.  It's preferable for there to be an equal number of male & female coveners but Witchcraft seems to be a lot like SL, in that women tend to be over-represented.

The word "warlock" comes from the Old Norse term varð-lokkur, which means "spirit caller." As such, it isn't necessarily derrogatory. That said, it is a word seldom used in Witchcraft. The etymology that would derive the word from the Old English wærloga: "oath breaker" or "traitor," is simply incorrect. However, since many have come to accept this incorrect derivation, the word warlock is considered to be derrogatory by many. For this reason it's better to call any Wiccan initiate simply "Witch," be they male of female. 

As for the Álfr, or "elves," this is a general term referring to two "races" or "species" of beings - the Ljósálfar and Dökkálfar - both of whom are skilled in Majik and in techne. The Ljósálfar are associated with and worship the Vanir. Freyja is their Queen. Their home is Álfheimr and is a lovely place to visit, altho not without its dangers. The Dökkálfar dwell in the underworld. If they worship anything it is wealth. My advise is to not bother them, unless you have a very specific reason to do so and then, bear them valuable gifts and treat them with the utmost respect. Better yet, don't even go there. 

I hope this clears things up.

Jeanne

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JeanneAnne wrote:


Mayalily wrote:



...

There are no male fairies.  You are an elf.  Silly men.  If you want to be of the order of Fae, you will have to cut your family jewels off as there are no expections to the order of Fae. 

There are no male witches either.  Male witches are called Warlocks.  Again, silly men. 

You know, I wasn't going to post here anymore, where the corporate overlords censor us and may ban us for mentioning taboo topics. I've moved on to SLUninverse. But... I just can't let this go unanswered.

Of course there are male Witches. There are a few Dianic covens that are female only but they are the exception not the rule. By the same token, there are all male covens of the Faery tradition. In the US it may be spelled Fairy. Rumor is that these covens are comprised of gay men but I don't really know. The vast majority of covens and traditions seek a balance between Goddess and God aspects, between Yin and Yang. Emphasis upon one aspect is legitimate but is dangerous. The great Dianic priestesses realize this and handle it well. I suppose this is also true of the learned priests of Fey. Less experienced or less wise practicioners can upset balance and then there is trouble that the Grandmothers must fix.

There are both female and male Witches in my mom's coven. Mom is always High Priestess (even with her leg in a cast! heeee
:P
) but various men, my husband among them, serve in the role of priest for various rituals and at various times of the year. In winter, especially, the role of the priest of the Antlered (not horned) God is predominant. Sometimes mom has a trainee High Priestess called the "Maiden" (altho she may well be a wife and mother) who takes on her role.  It's preferable for there to be an equal number of male & female coveners but Witchcraft seems to be a lot like SL, in that women tend to be over-represented.

The word "warlock" comes from the Old Norse term varð-lokkur, which means "spirit caller." As such, it isn't necessarily derrogatory. That said, it is a word seldom used in Witchcraft. The etymology that would derive the word from the Old English wærloga: "oath breaker" or "traitor," is simply incorrect. However, since many have come to accept this incorrect derivation, the word warlock
is
considered to be derrogatory by many. For this reason it's better to call any Wiccan initiate simply "Witch," be they male of female. 

As for the Álfr, or "elves," this is a general term referring to two "races" or "species" of beings - the Ljósálfar and Dökkálfar - both of whom are skilled in Majik and in techne. The Ljósálfar are associated with and worship the Vanir. Freyja is their Queen. Their home is Álfheimr and is a lovely place to visit, altho not without its dangers. The Dökkálfar dwell in the underworld. If they worship anything it is wealth. My advise is to not bother them, unless you have a very specific reason to do so and then, bear them valuable gifts and treat them with the utmost respect. Better yet, don't even go there. 

I hope this clears things up.

Jeanne

What she said.

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Scylla Rhiadra wrote:

LOL :smileyvery-happy:

 

Sorry, nothing else to add.
:)
 

Aww...that's a shame, because what's missing here is the confession from a RL bisexual skunk midget (or whatever he was).

Just sayin''.....

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