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A Warning on Daylight Savings Time


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Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:

What I have never understood is that when I flew down under....U.S. to Australia, I lost a day but when I returned I didn't get it back.

Left the U.S. on the 22nd and 23 Hours later landed in Sydney on the 24th.

But when I returned, left on the 30th and 23 hours later landed back in the U.S. on the 31st.

I have never been able to figure this out.  Where did the missing day go?

......if it takes two days to get to aussie land

But from the time I left the ground at O'Hare to the time I set down in Sydney only 23 hours passed, which is less than a whole day!  It did not take two days to get to Oz.

So I am still confuseded.

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:

What I have never understood is that when I flew down under....U.S. to Australia, I lost a day but when I returned I didn't get it back.

Left the U.S. on the 22nd and 23 Hours later landed in Sydney on the 24th.

But when I returned, left on the 30th and 23 hours later landed back in the U.S. on the 31st.

I have never been able to figure this out.  Where did the missing day go?

......if it takes two days to get to aussie land

But from the time I left the ground at O'Hare to the time I set down in Sydney only 23 hours passed, which is less than a whole day!  It did not take two days to get to Oz.

So I am still confuseded.

 

because it was already the 23rd  in austrailia when you left O'Hare..

 

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The problem with changing the clocks in the UK is it doesn't actually solve anything. We get six hours of daylight in the middle of winter so whatever time the clocks are set to, we are STILL going to have either really dark mornings or dark afternoons. It's impossible to get extra daylight at both ends without leaving the country.

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I would just like to confirm that all is well here in the UK after the clocks went back last night and I am one happy bunny having had an extra hours sleep. 

However, I will be back on in about 6 hours time to moan about how the clocks going back is the most evil thing in the world when it starts to go dark far too early!

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Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:


Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:

What I have never understood is that when I flew down under....U.S. to Australia, I lost a day but when I returned I didn't get it back.

Left the U.S. on the 22nd and 23 Hours later landed in Sydney on the 24th.

But when I returned, left on the 30th and 23 hours later landed back in the U.S. on the 31st.

I have never been able to figure this out.  Where did the missing day go?

......if it takes two days to get to aussie land

But from the time I left the ground at O'Hare to the time I set down in Sydney only 23 hours passed, which is less than a whole day!  It did not take two days to get to Oz.

So I am still confuseded.

 

because it was already the 23rd  in austrailia when you left O'Hare..

 

so why didn't that reverse when i was going backwards?

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To further complicate matters is a proposal to change the UK's time zone to a European one. Moving the UK clocks two hours further ahead, permanently.

Wasn't the whole idea of time zones predicated upon GMT, as in the main, centralized line determining all the time zones in the world runs though Greenwich, England? What would permanently moving England's clocks two hours forward do to the rest of the world?

I smell global meltdown! And people thought Y2K was confusing!

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:


Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:

What I have never understood is that when I flew down under....U.S. to Australia, I lost a day but when I returned I didn't get it back.

Left the U.S. on the 22nd and 23 Hours later landed in Sydney on the 24th.

But when I returned, left on the 30th and 23 hours later landed back in the U.S. on the 31st.

I have never been able to figure this out.  Where did the missing day go?

......if it takes two days to get to aussie land

But from the time I left the ground at O'Hare to the time I set down in Sydney only 23 hours passed, which is less than a whole day!  It did not take two days to get to Oz.

So I am still confuseded.

 

because it was already the 23rd  in austrailia when you left O'Hare..

 

so why didn't that reverse when i was going backwards?

it did..just at different speeds hehehehe

you spent 23 hours and the 23rd in the air going to austrailia when it was already the 23rd in australia..so you landed on the 24th..

going the other way against the flow of time zones you gained time because  you were going twords time instead of with it.. time was going a bit slower forward..

you left on the 30th but you also spent the 30th in the air and landed 23 hours later on the 31st..

going the other direction and the same distance you would have spent the 31st in the air instead of the 30th..because your departure time would have been in the past already if you compared it to the current destination time..

 

 

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Ceka Cianci wrote:
time was going a bit slower forward

But if it was going slower forward why did I lose so much time cause I was still in the air for the same number of hours?

bleh you are just playing around with me..hehehehe

you would have only lost time if you would have lived your days out in australia..you didn't ..you went back the direction you came from getting it all back..

let me show you..here is the international dateline..

dateln.gif

 

on the left side it is the 23rd...on the right side the direction you would be coming from it is the 22nd..

when you crossed  that line it moved into the next day which was the 23rd..it may have even already been the 24th depending on what time it was when you crossed the line..

so if you go by destination time you actually spent the austrailian 23rd in the air and hit midnight before you landed..

you gained all that back when you went back the other direction..

so you didn't lose anything really..

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Charolotte Caxton wrote:

Why does it go around Kiribati like that?

maybe it has to do with the equater and kirbati being so close to it..maybe hehehe

i really don't know..

it could be a territory of a country on the same side..

now i have to look it up lol

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See this entry from about.com:

 

In 1995 the tiny Pacific Ocean country of Kiribati moved the International Date Line. The reason for the change was not geopolitical strategy but simply a desire on the part of Kiribati for the entire country to be simultaneously on the same day at the same time. Prior to 1995, the western part of Kiribati, where Tarawa, the capital lies, would be 22 hours ahead the eastern portion of the country because of a funny little line known as the International Date Line.
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Ceka Cianci wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:


Ceka Cianci wrote:
time was going a bit slower forward

But if it was going slower forward why did I lose so much time cause I was still in the air for the same number of hours?

bleh you are just playing around with me..hehehehe

you would have only lost time if you would have lived your days out in australia..you didn't ..you went back the direction you came from getting it all back..

let me show you..here is the international dateline..

dateln.gif

 

on the left side it is the 23rd...on the right side the direction you would be coming from it is the 22nd..

when you crossed  that line it moved into the next day which was the 23rd..it may have even already been the 24th depending on what time it was when you crossed the line..

so if you go by destination time you actually spent the austrailian 23rd in the air and hit midnight before you landed..

you gained all that back when you went back the other direction..

so you didn't lose anything really..

So what happens to an astronaut if he is in a Geo-synchronis orbit?

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Perrie Juran wrote:

So what happens to an astronaut if he is in a Geo-synchronis orbit?


Three things...

1) He ages a li'l faster than us because he's feeling less gravitational time dilation than we are (which is not completely offset by his greater velocity time dilation).

2) He gets bored with same people waving at him all the time and longs for the change of scenery an asynchronous orbit brings.

3) He brushes up on his Russian because they're the only ones who can get him back at the moment.

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Once you are out of the atmosphere you then you go into the realms of Universal Time and it's many variants and out of GMT.  For all intents and purposes the astronauts on the spaceship are existing in the same time frame as from where they took off.  The only factor that will change this is when they re-enter Earth's atmosphere and switch back to GMT and of course where they land.

So, if you take off from Cape Canaveral you leave at local time, to then transfer to UT for the purposes of worldwide tracking and telemetry and then return to GMT upon re-entry.  If you are landing back at the Cape then you have lost no time and have remained on Florida local time.  If you land anywhere else then it is +/- from Florida time depending on direction.

 

[ETA]  Think of it this way.  There is no need to adjust your clock while travelling.  If you were in an airplane you are not constantly winding your watch forward or back as you travel; there is no need.  It is only necessary once you land.

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Sy Beck wrote:

[ETA]  Think of it this way.  There is no need to adjust your clock while travelling.  If you were in an airplane you are not constantly winding your watch forward or back as you travel; there is no need.  It is only necessary once you land.

As an engineer who's natural bent is to want precision, I avoid these concerns by carrying my family heirloom pocketwatch. It stopped ticking in 1952, saving three generations of McMasters from the worries of punctuality.

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Sy Beck wrote:

[ETA]  Think of it this way.  There is no need to adjust your clock while travelling.  If you were in an airplane you are not constantly winding your watch forward or back as you travel; there is no need.  It is only necessary once you land.

As an engineer who's natural bent is to want precision, I avoid these concerns by carrying my family heirloom pocketwatch. It stopped ticking in 1952, saving three generations of McMasters from the worries of punctuality.

Then you have that rarest of things, a watch that is completely accurate, at least twice a day.  :smileywink:

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:

So what happens to an astronaut if he is in a Geo-synchronis orbit?


Three things...

1) He ages a li'l faster than us because he's feeling less gravitational time dilation than we are (which is not completely offset by his greater velocity time dilation).

But with less gravitational wear and tear on his body wouldn't he age slower?


Madelaine McMasters wrote:

2) He gets bored with same people waving at him all the time and longs for the change of scenery an asynchronous orbit brings.

He could always look at the rear window at the stars.


Madelaine McMasters wrote:

3) He brushes up on his Russian because they're the only ones who can get him back at the moment.

We could just give him a parachute.

 


Sy Beck wrote:

[ETA]  Think of it this way.  There is no need to adjust your clock while travelling.  If you were in an airplane you are not constantly winding your watch forward or back as you travel; there is no need.  It is only necessary once you land.


People still wear watches?  My cell phone has a clock that goes backwards and forwards automatically for me.

 

 

 

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