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fine12

I love writing but im losing motivation, always tired and after school I just can't be bothered.?

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I know I need to get more sleep, *sigh* but I've already looked for a solution on yahoo answ, ers not even the medication I was prescribed even worked.

Im 16, I feel my life is boring, well I suppose every teen life is. Get up, get dress, go to school by afternoon am tired as hell, need to some how muster the strength to do homework and chores (god knows how I would handle a job). Ever since I was in grade 3, (I am in grade 10 now) I've wanted to be an authour. Of course my preception of authours have changed since then, but I still love writing, still want to be a published authour. I love creating stories but well... I've been finding it hard to write.

Everyone I know who bothered to read my writing have said I am really good and I believe them. But I'm struggling. The book im writing I've been writing since year 8... I never got the first draft done. I got pass halfway, lost the copy, had to rewrite. I call this my "second draft" though, it is far better then the original draft. But I've only done the first 5 chapters, I havent writtern in ages, Im finding it hard to get into a routine. I dont know what im going to do in year 11, when I'll be loaded with homework and study. I can barely manage it now.

Do you have suggestions? This book I am writing I really feel good about, I really want to get this published, but the task seems impossible. What are you suggestions? Should I just pratice writing short stories or something then continue my novel when I leave school?  http://www.uklv.info/g.php

Just as an add onIm going to be getting a bachelors of arts in university, and considering a post graduate course to become a libraian. Do you think thats a good idea?

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If you have an imaginative mind and love writing, why don't you try adopting role play in Second Life and acting through one of your ideas in world? Other avatars may role play too and take your initial ideas and move them forwards in ways that you have never imagined. It would provide an ideal opportunity for you to evaluate your ideas and stretch your imagination to provide the basis for plots that you would have never imagined unaided and, perhaps, may provide a springboard for a most exciting story line that you could extend yourself.

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Think about starting a blog.  You might, for example, write short stories about the people in your novel.   If you have readers of your blog, they would be a beginning market for your book.  You would have to promote your blog, of course, but that would be good experience for promoting your book.  

There are lots of  writers in Second Life, and several writer's groups.  Your age may keep you from going to places where the writers hang out,  But you might be able to join groups and follow the happenings,  Written Word has a website you could join.  Contact Jilly Kidd  (inworld) if you want more information about that.

  TKR

PS: My blog is:

http://virtualoutworlding.blogspot.com/

 

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If you have a passion for writing, write what you know and love.  Read authors who write the stuff you love to read.  Learn from them.  How do they move a story forward?  What types of characters are appealing?  You are sixteen yet you have stories you can write.  You have experiences you can tap into and imagination you can explore.  You feel tired at the end of the day yet I bet you could find 20-30 minutes each day just to write.  If you get stuck on your book, write something else.  Write anything else just to write.

Follow your passion.  Good luck!

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If you are good at love doing it, go for it. You are 16 now is the moment. What would your reaction be at 30 and stuck in a boring job with family responsabilities and knowing you could be a writer if you took your chances at 16? Life won't get easier, there will be work, chores, kids, bills to pay,  PTA meetings to go to, performance reviews at work... . Take your chance while still young.

 

I am not a writer but would suggest trying to do short stories and get them published in a magazine of sorts. Even the proces of trying to get your story published will be valuable. You will get feedback from professional editors and people who know what the public wants. There's also the blog, if you have a blog with your stories or the chapters of your novel as they come out, people will want to come back and see what is new. Your followers can be a reference for publishers when you want to publish the next novel.

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with the tiredness what you can try to do is make a few diet changes lack of and stodgy heavy foods will make you feel tired and lethargic also find 5 minutes at least in the day when you can relax i always find 5 minutes of peace quiet and no distractions really helps.
i'm not a writer i play a musical instrument but the same thing could apply if i get bored and fed up of my instrument or a song i'm learning is making me loose the will to live i take one of my CD's or LP's i listen to it and i find i'll be inspired to search a song off it on a tab site if i don't have a sheet music book for it  and try to play it.
it may help you to take your mind off your current book and start writing another book or short story you could even try writing Fan Fic or Band Slash where you write what is quite often erotic stories about your favourite celebrity or tv show the blog thing as others have suggested is a great idea you could set a blog up on Livejournal they have various user created communities on writing and fan fic/slash publish your writing there and fellow members can give you feedback on what you've written 

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Hi fine12, welcome to the forums!

As you wondered, I think you should go smaller. A novel is pretty ambitious. I get tired just thinking about it, and maybe you do to, even though you feel good about it so far. I'd hardly expect an eight year old to maintain motivation on an eight year project, which your book has been so far. That's half your short lifetime! You may find your motivation returns once youv'e got that weight off your shoulders.

So, take smaller bites. Even short stories might be too long if you've got a busy school schedule. Try stories of a few paragraphs, they'll help you learn to be concise and you can have the satisfaction of actually getting them done. Some here have suggested blogging, but if you do so with the expectation of building an audience, you may find yourself pressured to produce there too. Do it for yourself, at your pace, but do it.

Have you thought about poetry? Poems force you to chew words slowly, rolling them around on your tongue to tease out the nuances of their texture and flavor. If you don't want to write poems, at least read some.

And I can't stress the importance of reading enough. One can't become a good writer without being a good reader. You needn't block out time for reading as you must for writing, you can get audio books or podcasts of short stories and listen to them while doing mindless work (hopefully not homework ;-)

Two of my favorite destinations for spoken short stories are:

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/

http://themoth.org/

Google "Rives" and "Sarah Kay" to find two wonderful spoken word poets who may help boost your enthusiam for building small, lovely, stories.

As for becoming a librarian, I wonder how big that job market will be in an age where people put libraries in their pockets. Before you pour your heart, soul and money into a post college/post graduate education, ask the university to show you placement results for their graduates (and be aware they'll inflate the results, they want your money). Ask for names of recent graduates you can call to ask about job prospects. If they won't provide them, find another school.

Good luck!

Maddy

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How about contacting other writers in-world and ask them about their experience? Ask them about their experience how to overcome a writing blockade. Visit Book Island and contact Sandor Zabelin. You will meet many like-minded people there and they have a regular writer's chat.

I have no idea about your "insomnia" problem. I was alwaysa bad sleeper myself since puberty and still am thirty years later. You learn to cope with it but that's not really a help, don't I know.:matte-motes-yawn:

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I don't think writing short stories instead of a novel will help much in this case. In fact it doesn't matter if you finish a short story in a week or one chapter of the novel. Fine's real problem is the tiredness and lack of motivation. And when properly motivated the tiredness will disappear by itself. When I reallly wanna do something I couldn't give a **bleep** about sleep. When I was busy writing my first novel I was even dreaming about my characters; sometimes I had the bestest ideas in the middle of the night, jumped out of the bed and hacked them into my laptop. But those things do only happen once you're already motivated.And the motivation is the true point here. If you're truely motivated you give a **bleep** about being tired or not.

So please ask yourself this: Do I really love writing? Do I love the creative process, do I love the endlesss hours of typing into my keyboard, do I love to invite my characters over for breakfast and discuss the plotline with them? Do I love to think their thoughts, do I love to live inside their heads, do I feel them?

And please be honest with yourself about it! Because in your post I only read about how you'd love to be published. And that's the wrong way to get at it. A publication should never be your main motivation. Write because you love to write. Not only will you have more fun throughout the process but you'll write better. If you write with the goal of finishing and being published your writing becomes a job, a chore, a duty, a pressure. And you certainly don't want that.

The same feeling I had when I read about your future plans. Girl, you're 16 y/o, this should be the time of your life! This is certainly not the time to break your head over the future and what you will do in a few years. The future is still far away for you, you've got all the time in the world to care about that stuff later. Now act like the teenager you are; party, party, party, get drunk and drugged, have a lot of sex (DISCLAIMER: when you're underaged and living in the USA please don't follow that last advice!). Write as little or as much as you fancy. Live a little!

What I don't get is that you describe your life as "boring" and assume that every teenager's life is like that. How dare you? As I said, with 16 you should have the time of your life right now. Every day should be a new adventure, should bring you new experiences, new scars and new triumphs. To be honest, with 16 you shouldn't even think about writing anything, not even the shortest short stories. No time to sit at home and spend hours behind a keyboard. This sort of pastime is for middle aged houswifes who done it all already, who have their wild times behind them.

And for fecks sake don't turn into a control freak. Stop worrying!!!

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I would agree with a previous suggestion about writing a blog.  Every day's entry can be independent in subject from anything else you have written and it is satisfying to start something and complete it.  You will also think to yourself,

"Oh.  I just dashed off 400 words in half an hour and it did not feel like a chore."

It will get you into the habit of writing each day, which I think is important.

Spend some time every day doing something connected with your writing.  It does not have to involve writing fresh words.  I sometimes print off a couple of pages and carry them around with me that day.  If there is a spare bit of time, I get the pages out and scribble all over it with a pencil to improve it in several ways: I go hunting for words that are not necessary and cross them out; I'll look at words and try to think of better ones; I'll check for things such as variation in sentence length.  There is ALWAYS something you can improve upon and most people find that the editing and reworking takes up the majority of time spent writing a story.

If I have been struggling with a plot, chatting with people inworld has always helped me.  Either the other person suggests something that works with a problem in the plot or the very fact that I am talking about it leads me to thinking of the solution.  I'd say that the vast majority of chats about a story I have been writing have been useful enough for me to decide to save the conversation as a vital thing to look at the next day.

Good luck!

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A blog might be too much for fine12. He seems to be unable to even write a reply to those who have responded to his OP. I wonder if he has ever been in-world as his name doesn't show in search.

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I haven't bothered to read anything anyone else has written in response to you, maybe I should have.  But what you said in your OP really struck a chord with me.

When I was your age, I wanted to be a writer too.  Everyone said I was great at the time, and for my age back then, I guess I was.   What I didn't understand was that I had no experience with the outside world.  I would love to talk to you and be your friend in SL, but I think that would just hinder you from doing what you really need to do, which is live life.  Real life.

If you really want to be a great author, you'll have to go out and experience things for yourself, talk to real people, gather your own sense of what the world is really all about... develop your own opinion, your own perspective.  No one can ever see the world the way you do... use that to your advantage.

But more than anything, keep writing.  Never stop... never give up.  Even if no one ever cares what you write, what you write will always mean something to someone.  That's what makes you great.

Never stop being great ...Dres

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