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Here’s to the Crazy One.

The misfit. The rebel. The troublemaker. The round peg in the square hole.

The One Who Saw Things Differently.

He wasn't fond of rules. And he had no respect for the status quo.

You can quote him, disagree with him, glorify or vilify him.

About the only thing you can’t do is ignore him.

Because he changed things.

He pushed the human race forward. And while some may have seen him as the crazy one, we saw genius.

Because the man who was crazy enough to think he could change the world...

 

 

 

...was the one who did.

 

 

 

Thank you, Mr. Jobs.

 

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You ever wonder what the world would be like if at the edge of any of those precipices he had refused to jump? What if back in the 1970s, Steve Jobs had said, "you know, Hewlett-Packard is a great company. I would be crazy to quit my position here. Woz, I can't take that kind of risk, you're going to have start that computer company without me."

What if in the 1980s after Apple had fired him, he had said screw it, I have enough money and from now I'm just going to play video games and chase chicks for the rest of my life?

What if at the end of the decade, he had told George Lucas, "you know George, $10 million is just too much for Pixar. I'm gonna take the $10 million and retire to Hawaii. You can keep Pixar."

What if in 2001, he had said "portable music player? We're a computer company, we don't do music" and nixed the iPod? 

What is the worst case scenario if you take the leap? You'll end living under a bridge? What is the best case? Either way, we all be dead soon. 

Steve Jobs was an insanely great dude.  He really did put a ding in the universe.

 

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Steve Jobs was a man who wanted to change the world, and who had both the talent and the will to do so. His creative vision will be missed.

I remember in 1984, seeing a demo of the very first Macintosh computer, at a college campus, before most people had ever heard of the Macintosh computer. It was the first time I ever looked at a computer and said "Now THAT is cool!". Say what you will about Mac versus PC. The fact that Windows is now almost a clone of the point and click user interface pioneered in the Macintosh tells the story. Yes, Xerox was actually there first with the concept of a mouse and clicking on icons. But Apple made it something that was central to a commercially-available operating system and programs, and was "the way it should be done".

Farewell, Steve Jobs. You did change the world.

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RIP Mr. Jobs, you were a fantastic salesman.  

I wonder if you passed knowing how people are protesting the corporate greed of Wall St. - of big business.  Your built your company to represent everything evil in corporate greed: "the luxury brand" -- the flip of the bird to IBM? What has Apple become?  You will be remembered.   You will not be forgotten.  You are one of the first great salemen of this young technology age.  

 

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Storm Clarence wrote:

RIP Mr. Jobs, you were a fantastic salesman.  

I wonder if you passed knowing how people are protesting the corporate greed of Wall St. - of big business.  Your built your company to represent everything evil in corporate greed: "the luxury brand" -- the flip of the bird to IBM? What has Apple become?  You will be remembered.   You will not be forgotten.  You are one of the first great salemen of this young technology age.  

 

He was far more than a salesman. The closest word that we have in English is prophet. Not in the sense that he prophesied the future. He visualized what he thought it should look like and enrolled others in his vision and then they went out and invented it. He didn't just believe in his product, he made others believers. Apple customers are some of the most faithful in the world. His presentations were mesmerizing and the air around him electric.  

He was also a Zen Buddhist. This may be the last we'll see him of him in this incarnation, but he'll be back. He was a good and holy man.

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http://www.apple.com/

 

Steve was an early mind-crush of mine.  Back in the early 1980's Omni magazine did an article on him, included a picture, etc.  I read that article and looked at his picture and was smitten.  He embodied all the qualities that piqued my interests.  Brilliant, innovative, entrepreneur, geeky-techy, ...and pretty damn hot looking.  ; ) 

 

(in RL...my job just got harder : (

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I've never owned an apple product in my life but that doesn't mean I don't recognise the contribution Steve Jobs made to the technology industry - and as such to everyone across the planet. He fought a good fight and he will be missed by many.

Bill Gates did a lovely tribute to him last night.

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i've never been a fan of Mac's & i wouldn't be owning an iPod if i hadn't been sent a free one (i also have a much better mp3) but you have to hand it to Mr. Jobs for making Apple a cool desirable brand when the iMac came out i did think i wanted one until i had to use them i could never get my head round the OS and the different way of doing things. now-a-days you can't walk down the street with out seeing someone use an iPod or an iPod phone and people are willing to pay over the top prices to have them

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An important reminder:

  • born in San Francisco in Feb 1955 to [unmarried] students Joanne Schieble and Syrian-born Abdulfattah Jandali
  • adopted by a Californian working class couple
  • had a summer job at Hewlett-Packard while at school - later worked at Atari
  • dropped out of college after six months and went traveling in India, where he became a Buddhist

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-15193922

In other words, an adopted, mixed-race, working-class drop-out becomes one of the wealthiest and most admired people on the planet. Which reminds me, don't we have another mixed-race, working-class guy as President?

Steve Job's greatest legacy is to remind us that attitude and intelligence determine the course of our lives.

ETA:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/73df0a0a-dfae-11e0-8e15-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1a0Icr1YK

(if this link gives you a hard time, google "From Migrant to Magnate")

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-14902975

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No apples for me, ever and he didn't invent horrid lossy music formats, but he certainly capitalised on them. To this day in audio circles the myth persists that Macinsploshes rule. Which is pretty funny. There was a time...in a distant place.... lol

Well done Mr Jobs, salesman extraordinaire and nice person it would seem. R.I.P.

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