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Pi v Tau


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A year or so ago, there was a delightful thread that 'degenerated' into a war between pie and cake. Little did I know at the time that it was merely a precursor to a much greater battle. Well, the gloves are off and I can see this topic will dominate the fora for years to come. Child avis, pffft. Firestorm v V2, yawn. SL v FB, zzzzzzz. It's time to unleash Pi v Tau:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13906169

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yes, but programming geekery doesn't override my math geekery.

true story:
while in school I independently recreated the Sieve of Eratosthenes, by accident no less, to help with my homework, never having heard of it before... and went on to find two rules for primes before I learned about them (actually 1 rule, and a corollary I've never seen mentioned anywhere else).

I was a math geek before I was a programming geek, which is why it's so embarrassing to admit that rotations still give me headaches and I just memorize the formulas and not the math.

ETA:
yes, I'm aware of the irony, that in different fields of math, some symbols have different meanings, but tau is a basic geometry variable, and it wouldn't do to have two conflicting uses in the same field... it's an interesting idea, although I'm not sure that I agree with the premise, I just think it needs a different symbol

(a similar argument could be made the the circumference should be the base, giving constants for D and R of 0.3138 and 0.1592 respectively... but it's easier to measure a diameter or radius than a circumference)

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once upon a time I'd have taken a shot at that.... back before what I know now

namely, that not only have greater minds tried and failed using methods far beyond me; but they've also spent large portions of their life on it.

 

ps.
that corrolary I was talking about? given a linear series of prime numbers starting at the first (n[1] which is 2), and ending at n[x], the sieve method can reliably find all primes up to n[x+1]^2 which will be the first one it misidentifies as prime.... it's a consequence of the square law, but very useful in computing your maximum numerical value you can handle when building a list sieve on the fly. mathematically it's probably too inconsequential to note, but procedurally it's significant.

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