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What SL teaches about other countries/cultures


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8 minutes ago, CaithLynnSayes said:

Hah, i didn't actually know that. I know i make the then/than mistake often.

 

Never the your/you're mistake though.... never..... ;) 

It's pretty easy to remember. Then refers to time; Than is a comparison. And never the twain shall meet.

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Just now, Silent Mistwalker said:

lol I was typing my post when you posted yours.

That little trick to remember brought to you by my 80 yr. old Advanced Grammar teach in 12th grade more than a few years ago.

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3 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

I learned that Brits have turkey for Christmas dinner.

And that Brussels sprouts must be on the table for Christmas whether they are eaten or not.

And I learned how to make a Christmas pudding (in SL).

 

In my family, Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners have always been turkey and ham. The tradition goes at least as far back as my great grandmother, and I have grandkids.

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5 hours ago, Pamela Galli said:

While you are at it, come over here to the US and teach the same lesson. Also about your and you’re, their, they’re, there, its and it’s. And SOOOO  much more. Europeans speak and write English better than we do.

Don't forget 'further' and 'farther' -- though I don't know if the Europeans understand those two any better than most US folks.

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2 minutes ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

Don't forget 'further' and 'farther' -- though I don't know if the Europeans understand those two any better than most US folks.

I don't know for the other European languages but that difference is not available in Dutch either. Both are 'verder'.
Isn't farther typically American?

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16 hours ago, Pamela Galli said:

What insights about other countries/cultures have you had due to SL?

I don't think that I have had many as it is not a subject I often indulge in, and this may be the first time I've actually participated in any dialogue regarding cultures while in an SL environment.  When I was younger, and the Internet did not exist it used to fascinate me, and I'm sure I would drive a person crazy asking them about their country and culture - now I typically just read about different cultures on other websites or watch videos regarding them.  

Edited by Istelathis
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27 minutes ago, Silent Mistwalker said:

I think that about 99% of my posts have been edited. lmao

I actually learned some English grammar through the very browser i'm using now. It obviously knows when i do a typo and underlines it with red, but lately it also underlines when (to use the recent example) i misuse then and than. It underlines it in gray.

 

I guess i have no excuse now to misuse those words. But thanks for actually telling me the difference between those words, i didn't know.

Also, i apologize for going off topic. Is this off topic? Not sure.

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3 minutes ago, Sid Nagy said:

I don't know for the other European languages but that difference is not available in Dutch either. Both are 'verder'.
Isn't farther typically American?

While we're on that train, let's "attack" the British. Why tire and not tyre. Why grey and not gray, ... ;) 

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6 minutes ago, CaithLynnSayes said:

Also, i apologize for going off topic. Is this off topic? Not sure.

Language is a huge part of culture. So spot on IMHO.
Did you for instance know that the Inuit have dozens of different words for snow and ice types?
Amazing.

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33 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

I learned that Brits have turkey for Christmas dinner.

And that Brussels sprouts must be on the table for Christmas whether they are eaten or not.

And I learned how to make a Christmas pudding (in SL).

 

Same here in Ireland, ham too and Christmas cake. Not that different from the Brits after all 🥂

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@Sid Nagy, @Phil Deakins was not chastising you, he was simply educating you, in a very direct, Dutch-like manner.

To those who apologize for Sid by pointing at all the Americans who can't speak their own language, I say yes, you are correct about that. But it doesn't excuse Sid's misuse, that's a logical fallacy you're committing there.

As for the original question, I've learned that as fascinating as the streets of Tokyo appear, I probably don't want to actually go there. Way too much flashing neon. I'd probably have a seizure. I probably don't want to go hike the African veldt either. Too many lions.  I'd probably GET seized. I don't want to visit Australia, because as lovely as the accent sounds, I don't wanna eat Vegemite.

The more I learn about the world, the more I think it looks best in the pages of the National Geographic.

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5 minutes ago, CaithLynnSayes said:

While we're on that train, let's "attack" the British. Why tire and not tyre. Why grey and not gray, ... ;) 

Reminds me of that old joke "I just flew back from a Transformers convention and boy, are my arms tyres" 🙂 I don't know why Americans spell it 'gray' though...

 

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9 minutes ago, Istelathis said:

When I was younger, and the Internet did not exist it used to fascinate me, and I'm sure I would drive a person crazy asking them about their country and culture - now I typically just read about different cultures on other websites or watch videos regarding them.  

Oh, I haven't let the internet stop me from driving people crazy. When I hear someone with an accent, I often ask where they are from, what they miss most about there, and like most about here.

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16 minutes ago, Sid Nagy said:

I don't know for the other European languages but that difference is not available in Dutch either. Both are 'verder'.
Isn't farther typically American?

'Farther' is for physical distance and 'further' is for figurative distance, but the usage seems to blend a lot these days.

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3 minutes ago, Sid Nagy said:

Did you for instance know that the Inuit have dozens of different words for snow and ice types?
Amazing.

Yes, in fact. If you're curious, I recommend finding a way to view the mystery film Smilla's Sense of Snow, or reading the original novel.  As I recall, the plot, set in Greenland, involves a lot of Innuit culture and language.

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2 minutes ago, Lindal Kidd said:

@Sid Nagy, @Phil Deakins was not chastising you, he was simply educating you, in a very direct, Dutch-like manner.

To those who apologize for Sid by pointing at all the Americans who can't speak their own language, I say yes, you are correct about that. But it doesn't excuse Sid's misuse, that's a logical fallacy you're committing there.

Hey, that was a totally okay post from Phil.
Phil is always straight forward. He could easily be Dutch or have Dutch ancestors.
No apologizes needed whatsoever. He started a nice discussion though.

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