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Even a therapist need it own therapist


robinswee
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“Waka Waka Waka” – Pacman

 

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Well yes, surgeons needs surgeons too and vets need vets.

though I have once performed small surgery on myself, out of necessity, nothing major just a reactive cyst. 
It’d be harder for a shrink to self analyse and diagnose though? Isn’t there something about the use of self in therapy?

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On 1/2/2022 at 5:32 PM, Krystina Ferraris said:

Well yes, surgeons needs surgeons too and vets need vets.

though I have once performed small surgery on myself, out of necessity, nothing major just a reactive cyst. 
It’d be harder for a shrink to self analyse and diagnose though? Isn’t there something about the use of self in therapy?

Hold on a minute, are you saying that there are animals who are veterinarians? The world just became a little bit more magical.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 12/30/2021 at 11:03 AM, robinswee said:

we all need each other 

While it's true we all need each other to some extent, I've never quite understood why a person who does not have their own mental ailments figured out would even consider becoming a therapist (I am responding to your title).

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On 1/2/2022 at 8:32 PM, Krystina Ferraris said:

Well yes, surgeons needs surgeons too and vets need vets.

though I have once performed small surgery on myself, out of necessity, nothing major just a reactive cyst. 
It’d be harder for a shrink to self analyse and diagnose though? Isn’t there something about the use of self in therapy?

One of the thing that calms my nerves the most when having to go to the dentist is knowing that the dentist also has to see a dentist for their own dental treatment, especially root canals and extractions! 

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12 hours ago, xLunaea said:

While it's true we all need each other to some extent, I've never quite understood why a person who does not have their own mental ailments figured out would even consider becoming a therapist (I am responding to your title).

That has something to do with perspective - no matter how good they are, they might overlook something with themselves, or even deny a thruth about themselves - so an "outsider"s perspective can help with that, and to keep things a bit fresh, heh.  It's not that they didn't figure their own mental health issues out, but some are simply better worked on my others. Also, keep in mind that many are confronted with a lot of traumatized people - that can have an effect on the therapist as well, so they may need someone to talk to about it to process this. 

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13 hours ago, xLunaea said:

While it's true we all need each other to some extent, I've never quite understood why a person who does not have their own mental ailments figured out would even consider becoming a therapist (I am responding to your title).

It's just a very profitable job. Same way a driving instructor can drive recklessly, a policeman can also be breaking the law, a mechanic can neglect his own car.. etc.

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2 hours ago, Nick0678 said:

It's just a very profitable job. Same way a driving instructor can drive recklessly, a policeman can also be breaking the law, a mechanic can neglect his own car.. etc.

Not just that. It's also a very stressful job in which they are exposed to people with a wide variety of mental and psychological issues. So they might be in great shape themselves to begin with, but years of that is going to take a toll.

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They are actually encouraged to see a therapist, (psychologists) before.they graduate.  A friend has gone back to school to be a psychologist and he sees a therapist.  It's good to know both sides of the desk.

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12 minutes ago, Maitimo said:

Not just that. It's also a very stressful job in which they are exposed to people with a wide variety of mental and psychological issues. So they might be in great shape themselves to begin with, but years of that is going to take a toll.

Yes probably some might get affected, although hardcore cases go straight to psychiatrists for treatment.

It really depends on the case if a therapist or a psychologist or a psychiatrist is the best option.

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On 1/28/2022 at 2:35 AM, Sukubia Scarmon said:

That has something to do with perspective - no matter how good they are, they might overlook something with themselves, or even deny a thruth about themselves - so an "outsider"s perspective can help with that, and to keep things a bit fresh, heh.  It's not that they didn't figure their own mental health issues out, but some are simply better worked on my others. Also, keep in mind that many are confronted with a lot of traumatized people - that can have an effect on the therapist as well, so they may need someone to talk to about it to process this. 

A good therapist has their own ailments figured out and can help other people without letting their issues personally affect them. You can't help another person if you cannot first help yourself. I firmly believe in that.

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1 hour ago, xLunaea said:

A good therapist has their own ailments figured out and can help other people without letting their issues personally affect them. You can't help another person if you cannot first help yourself. I firmly believe in that.

They do it precisely so it doesn't affect their ability to help...  Again, they do get confronted with some pretty heavy stuff at times. To talk to someone about it as a means to process this, does not make them a bad therapist. It makes them a responsible one, because that IS them helping themselves by doing so - I'd argue it's a bit similar to a barber who lets another barber cut their hair.

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30 minutes ago, Sukubia Scarmon said:

They do it precisely so it doesn't affect their ability to help...  Again, they do get confronted with some pretty heavy stuff at times. To talk to someone about it as a means to process this, does not make them a bad therapist. It makes them a responsible one, because that IS them helping themselves by doing so - I'd argue it's a bit similar to a barber who lets another barber cut their hair.

I don't agree. As someone who was looking into becoming a therapist and knowing that more than half of them need therapy themselves tells me that most therapists don't have what it takes to be a therapist. You need to have mental/emotional stability and logical reasoning. Not having those and then getting 'triggered' by other people's emotional turmoil shows that you don't have what it takes to be in that field.

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In a 1994 survey of psychologists by Kenneth Pope and Barbara Tabachnick, 84 percent reported having had psychotherapy themselves, although only 13 percent had attended a graduate program requiring personal therapy for therapists-in-training [2]. Whether by mandate, urging, or independent choice, many practicing psychotherapists can claim experience in "the other chair."

Is therapy required in order to become a therapist? In the U.S., generally not. According to Geller, Norcross, and Orlinsky [1]: "In most European countries, a requisite number of hours of personal therapy is obligatory in order to become accredited or licensed as a psychotherapist. In the United States, by contrast, only analytic training institutes and a few graduate programs require a course of personal therapy."

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sacramento-street-psychiatry/201109/therapy-therapists

 

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