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Why Can't You Save Notecards Off-line?


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So you can't save notecards outside of SL, which is a chore. You can only cut and paste them into a document.

But they actually have a SAVE button on them, so maybe this was once contemplated.

If you can save a photo or a texture outside of SL, why can't you save a notecard?

Isn't it the same principle?

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24 minutes ago, Prokofy Neva said:

So you can't save notecards outside of SL, which is a chore. You can only cut and paste them into a document.

But they actually have a SAVE button on them, so maybe this was once contemplated.

If you can save a photo or a texture outside of SL, why can't you save a notecard?

Isn't it the same principle?

Textures and pictures can't be changed as notecards can be.  The save on notecards is obviously for changes made and not for saving to your HD.

I've used n the snipping tool to snip a picture of a notecard so you could try that. Save to documents.

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48 minutes ago, Prokofy Neva said:

But they actually have a SAVE button on them,

From my experience save and keep do the save thing except one closes the notecard and the other keeps it open for you to hack away at a bit more?

(Don't trust me on this, I've got up because of insomnia, I had a waking dream that somebody had replied to a post I made so I got up to see if it was true, and in a sense it was; somebody had indeed replied but it wasn't the person mentioned in the waking dream)

Edited by Profaitchikenz Haiku
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Just thinking, if there are a significant number of notecards to be saved, the best way is to use Radegast, it has an option to backup the inventory to disk. It saves notecards, textures and scripts if the permissions allow.

If there are several items in a folder with the same name, only the most recent one will end up on disk, so if you have a dozen "new note" notecards, you will have to rename them by appending sequence numbers, such as new note 01, new note 02, ...

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1 hour ago, Profaitchikenz Haiku said:

Just thinking, if there are a significant number of notecards to be saved, the best way is to use Radegast, it has an option to backup the inventory to disk. It saves notecards, textures and scripts if the permissions allow.

If there are several items in a folder with the same name, only the most recent one will end up on disk, so if you have a dozen "new note" notecards, you will have to rename them by appending sequence numbers, such as new note 01, new note 02, ...

No, I mean out of Second Life's inventory, not Notepad or something like that. Unless this is an app that works with Second Life?

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Yes, it's a text-based browser. Log in, there will be a very basic world view, low ;level detail, but full chat and IMs, and under inventory is a drop-down field for backup. Choose a folder, and your SL inventory folder structure will be recreated to contain any textures, scripts and notecards whose permissions allow you to save a copy. It can take twenty minutes or so for somebody with a large collection of stuff.

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Notecards can be pretty complicated. I'm not sure what it would mean to save a notecard to local disk if it included embedded contents such as textures, landmarks, scripts, or other assets (even objects). On the other hand, it would be very possible for a script to dump to a browser window a pure text notecard (the only kind of notecard a script can read) and it's pretty easy to save a browser window's contents to a local file.

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13 hours ago, Profaitchikenz Haiku said:

Yes, it's a text-based browser. Log in, there will be a very basic world view, low ;level detail, but full chat and IMs, and under inventory is a drop-down field for backup. Choose a folder, and your SL inventory folder structure will be recreated to contain any textures, scripts and notecards whose permissions allow you to save a copy. It can take twenty minutes or so for somebody with a large collection of stuff.

Ok, I will try that. I looked for it on the MP and it wasn't there. So now that you have explained that this is a viewer and I have found you can get it here, I will try it.

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8 hours ago, Qie Niangao said:

Notecards can be pretty complicated. I'm not sure what it would mean to save a notecard to local disk if it included embedded contents such as textures, landmarks, scripts, or other assets (even objects). On the other hand, it would be very possible for a script to dump to a browser window a pure text notecard (the only kind of notecard a script can read) and it's pretty easy to save a browser window's contents to a local file.

Yes, obviously if you just copy and paste a notecard, if it has pictures and landmarks, in other programs those will show up as question marks or not at all. But still, it's something. But again, if SL can save a texture or picture, why can't it save a notecard with text and pictures.

 

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Using Firestorm, open a notecard and note the "Edit" button. Pressing this will open the notecard in WordPad. From there, the normal "File -> Save As" option will create a copy on your computer, wherever you specified.

@Qie Niangaopoints out that embedded contents might be tricky. I'm not sure how this might work out; I'll experiment later. But for a quick and easy way to save a text notecard to computer, this will work just fine.

@Prokofy Neva, do I remember correctly that you don't like to use Firestorm? Forgive me if I'm wrong. I don't know if other viewers present this "Edit" option.

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Lyssa Greymoon said:

The Linden viewer does, but you have to tell it what editor to use the first time you press edit.

No, I'm not going to use the Firestorm editor.

And when you go into edit on the regular SL viewer, you get this message:

And then what? Where do you go? What do you do? This may seem obvious or intuitive to you, but it isn't to me, and therefore it becomes a hobble.

If the system can save your chat automatically to your hard drive, why can't it save a notecard with just text automatically?

 

0b7f6a9d1938f3718c5bb24ac6c6b7e2.png

Edited by Prokofy Neva
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1 hour ago, Prokofy Neva said:

No, I'm not going to use the Firestorm editor.

And when you go into edit on the regular SL viewer, you get this message:

And then what? Where do you go? What do you do? This may seem obvious or intuitive to you, but it isn't to me, and therefore it becomes a hobble.

If the system can save your chat automatically to your hard drive, why can't it save a notecard with just text automatically?

 

0b7f6a9d1938f3718c5bb24ac6c6b7e2.png

This is exactly why I didn’t mention it two days ago.

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'Tis a bit arcane, and I'm not sure why. I've never used this except to occasionally launch emacs to edit a script, and I didn't know it was even available for notecards. (That looks useful because the notecard editor in viewers is exceedingly lame.)

Anyway, here's a hint:

62085196_Screenshot2022-01-02133020.png.610c9cea36b7e9b725d180da0e5b71fc.png

A different text editor may be preferable, but that may make a start.

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14 hours ago, Profaitchikenz Haiku said:

I'll say, the only time I tried setting this up I tried doing it by environment variables and got nowhere. Now I know why.

I need to relearn how to set Windows environment variables every time I use them, which is about twice a decade. One apparently successful incantation on Win11:

  • <Windows key> + <Pause/Break key> to get to the "System > About" page, then
  • "Advanced system settings" from the mid-page "Related links" list to open the "Advanced" tab in "System Properties", then
  • "Environment Variables" opens a handy dialog where you can create a "New..." user-specific variable or "Edit..." one, a la:

658423960_Screenshot2022-01-03073000.png.2c471d32eaad637e6cdc89f9fb69eff8.png

  • Then I think the "Environment Variables" window needs an "OK" and the SL viewer needs a fresh launch to pick up the new variable.

There may be easier ways, and your mileage—and editor—may vary.

 

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3 hours ago, Qie Niangao said:

here may be easier ways, and your mileage—and editor—may vary.

Arcane ones are more fun.

Personally, I'm quite happy with the default script and notecard editors, but as the OP points out, being able to save them to disk is a major benefit.

If I really do need coloured highlighting I'll copy a script into something like Geany, but the sort of mistakes I commonly make aren't so easy to spot by highlighters, and the only other area where most people go for external editors is to check up on matching parentheses and braces, and there I find maintaining a rigorous tab discipline works just as well.

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Drifting further from Notecards, but nonetheless: What usually drives me to an external script editor is the ability to have two Emacs "windows" (sections of the same GUI window) open on the same buffer at the same time so I can refer to global variable or function definitions while editing code where they're used elsewhere in the script. Part of it is the dumb muscle memory for switching between those "windows" and scrolling them around without needing to lift my hands from the keyboard.

I'm sure some scripters have integrated their viewer into a legit IDE with configuration management and all but to me, for all the advantages, that starts to feel like work.

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4 hours ago, Qie Niangao said:

What usually drives me to an external script editor is the ability to have two Emacs "windows" (sections of the same GUI window) open on the same buffer at the same time so I can refer to global variable or function definitions while editing code where they're used elsewhere in the script.

Those of us who did a lot of their programming on 24-line 80/132 character terminals will understand perfectly. I used either emacs on Unix systems or EVE/TPU on the Vaxes in order to do exactly what you have described. When Windows arrived and you could open the same file in multiple instances, everything changed.

In SL what I tend to do when I need to view separate parts of a script is to chuck the declarations part into a notecard.

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