Jump to content

Wooster, Worcester, or Worcestershire sauce?


You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 67 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Ceka Cianci said:

If there is one thing I know, it's really good beef..  Smothering a steak at the table, then something is wrong with it.. A drop or two can enhance a good steak even more..

The meat I see in stores looks just terrible compared to what we raise.. I practically have to avoid the meat section in a store because my tummy will start to turn if I look at the beef.. hehehe

About the only time I marinade them is if we are grilling.. I'll do it with the veggies also.

Yes, It is really good on ribs for sure.:)

I can't wait to break out the grill. Grilled pineapple with some jerk sprinkled on is a nice quick snack on a hot day xD.

I'll throw everything on the grill.

image0.jpg

Edited by Finite
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Finite said:

I can't wait to break out the grill. Grilled pineapple with some jerk sprinkled on is a nice quick snack on a hot day xD.

I'll throw everything on the grill.

image0.jpg

Now I'm getting hungry.. hehehe

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Phil Deakins said:

Not up 'ere, it doesn't. Up 'ere it's always pronounced sher - sound like her. Yorksher, Lancasher, Derbysher, Hertfordsher, Herefordsher, etc. etc. etc.

I'm from oop eer, too, and yes, that's how it's pronounced when it's the name of a county.

The sauce, though, I've always heard called simply "Wooster sauce" (as in Bertie, which I had assumed was an intentional joke on the part of P. G. Wodehouse). 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, Quartz Mole said:

(as in Bertie, which I had assumed was an intentional joke on the part of P. G. Wodehouse). 

   Well, Bertie is occasionally quite saucy.

796624261c0a830c9f27570baf1cf6af.gif

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, ChinRey said:

Hey, that sounds a lot like garum and Worcester is an old Roman settlement! Is there a connection?

(a few minutes of frantic Googling later)

Seems there probably is, that's amazing!

(In case some ignorami stumble across this, garum is an ancient Greek/Phoenician condiment popularized by the Romans so we're talking about a recipe that is more than 2,000 and maybe even 3,000 years old.)

 

I'm glad someone finally looked it up.  Thank you. 

Now maybe the ones who tried to tell me I'm stupid and don't know what I'm talking about, will shut up.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Rowan Amore said:

Good god, why would anyone put either on a steak? No no no

 

Lea & Perrins is a seasoning used in cooking, not a condiment in that respect. It can be used as a condiment but wasn't originally intended to be one. You don't drown your food with it. It's meant to be used sparingly.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Silent Mistwalker said:

You don't drown your food with it. It's meant to be used sparingly.

59vces.jpg

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Orwar said:

59vces.jpg

 

Let me rephrase that then. lol

You can always add more when it's on your plate if you're one that likes a lot but if you are one that doesn't like a lot, you can' t take out what is already in it.

This is the reason why I rarely use salt (most things have it already to some degree) in my cooking. I don't like a lot of salt and my body doesn't need it but others do like a lot so I don't use it in cooking because if I use too much, it can't be removed but more can be added. 

TL;dr You can't take it back out, once you put it in. The flavor is there and can't be removed.

Edited by Silent Mistwalker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Quartz Mole said:

What's that like in a Bloody Mary?

It's a bit different in a BM.

We have a brand of Yorkshire Crisps, (chips), and the Henderson's Relish flavour are very nice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spelling . . . Worcester (City) and Worcestershire (County)

Pronunciation . . . Woosta / Woosta-sher 

Along the same lines we also have the city of Leicester and its county of Leicestershire - pronounced 'Lesta' and 'Lesta-sher'.

Then there's Gloucester and Gloucershire - 'Glosta' and Glosta-sher'. Then there's the town of Bicester, pronounced 'Bista'.

You Americans on here will be familiar with the concept of mismatched spelling and pronunciation from places like Arkansas and Des Moines!!!

 

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Conifer Dada said:

 

You Americans on here will be familiar with the concept of mismatched spelling and pronunciation from places like Arkansas and Des Moines!!!

 

We have New Hampshire and a lot of the cities in the Northeast are named after cities in the UK and pronounced similarly.  I think if you just add an "H" at the end of your pronunciation it would reflect how it's said in the Northeast US. Just about every city you listed exists in Massachusetts alone.  Leicester is actually right next to Worcester lol. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 67 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...