Jump to content
You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 337 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

An interesting story about one of the sheroes (Katalin Karikó) responsible for the development of the mRNA technology used in the initial vaccines, and how they actually work:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/redemption-one-scientists-unwavering-belief-mrna-gave-world/

Edited by Luna Bliss
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8SZOOuL.png

Moderna round 2 yesterday.

My arm feels like its been walloped, got no sleep, aches & pains, minor fever and a delightful mood. When this is all over I'm getting my nails done. Impractically long coffin acrylics FTW.

Take this as a preemptive apology if I seem overly abrasive today, I love you bunches really, look here's a smiley 😬

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those of us stuck after one AZ jab, here's some good news:

 

This is very encouraging but still early, looking at (a walloping huge) neutralizing antibody response. I still haven't seen results from the big UK study of this question (but they could be out there and I just missed them). Presumably those should include efficacy numbers.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had both of my shots, Saturday will be the two week mark after being vaccinated.  I received the pfizer vaccine, and so far I'm okay.  I thought I would get super powers, but I can't even get a magnet to stick to my arm, I think I was cheated.. plus I never did receive a sticker, all I got was a card.

 

I really wanted super powers :(

  • Like 2
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Sid Nagy said:

I get a second AZ tomorrow. So thankfully I don't have to sort that problem out.

UK, right? So 12 week inter-dose interval? Good for you.

I'm not quite halfway through my Canadian 16 weeks with no particular second dose scheduled. Not sure which I'd choose now, AZ or Pfizer, but the choice may not be up to me.

Other Canadians, the ones who waited a few weeks longer got a Pfizer first dose with another shot of the same on the bar, ready to pour.

… And yet: can't complain. Grateful, in fact. Team AstraZeneca, rah rah rah, the colours of our team of convenience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I trust the AZ jab as much as I would the Pfizer, Moderna or Janssen (J&J) ones.
Here in NL we have no choise. Different groups get different jabs, depending on what is considered best for that particularly group and availability.

Best part: The infection numbers are dropping fast since more than a week now. The province were I live was in the group with the highest rates in Europe for weeks. The two nearby hospitals even had to stop accepting new patients for a few days. That was more scary to me, than the possible side effects of a vaccination.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, and anyway it seems the second dose of AZ has no more risk of VITT than any of the other vaccines, unlike that first dose, so the only reason for wanting a choice is if these recent results mean that mixing vaccine doses confers more robust response to variants or some other improved immunity, compared to a second AZ.

No official here has hinted we'll get to choose the schedule of our second dose, which I'd like to hurry along. Originally AZ said 4 weeks, everybody else seems to be using 12 weeks, except Canada's 16 weeks. Whether it's greed or impatience, I'd take that month fully vaccinated, given the choice.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got my second Astra-Zeneca jab a couple of hour ago, "felt nowt, I tell you, Nowt!" and we went shopping in the supermarkets to maximise our car-journey usage. An hour later on the way back I was fascinated to feel little bits of the symptoms suddenly coming and going: a strange metallic taste and odd smell, irritated throat, and a hot forehead. Got back home, unloaded the shopping, and suddenly I'm right as rain.

A friend of mine who had her jabs quite early because she worked in care homes said after the second jab she was much more energetic. I'm hoping for that too, after the first jab I felt very lack-lustre.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/8/2021 at 3:33 PM, Luna Bliss said:

I was finally able to get my first shot yesterday!  Pfizer.  Arm a little sore and quarter-sized bruise, but otherwise fine.

Things are ramping up. 12 to 15 year-olds eligible next week.  Fingers crossed we reach herd immunity...

https://twitter.com/nowthisnews/status/1390122392375087104?s=20

 

Herd immunity is something that happens naturally.  The poke doesn't even make you immune anyways.  At best it's a symptom suppressor.  At worst....well, not good.  js

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, neopolaris said:
On 5/8/2021 at 3:33 PM, Luna Bliss said:

I was finally able to get my first shot yesterday!  Pfizer.  Arm a little sore and quarter-sized bruise, but otherwise fine.

Things are ramping up. 12 to 15 year-olds eligible next week.  Fingers crossed we reach herd immunity...

https://twitter.com/nowthisnews/status/1390122392375087104?s=20

 

Expand  

Herd immunity is something that happens naturally.  The poke doesn't even make you immune anyways.  At best it's a symptom suppressor.  At worst....well, not good.  js

I think I need to see a few studies which back up your assertions.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, neopolaris said:

Herd immunity is something that happens naturally.  The poke doesn't even make you immune anyways.  At best it's a symptom suppressor.  At worst....well, not good.  js

Sure, whatever you say.
All people who studied medicine like doctors or virologists are fooling us all.
Right.

Thanks for enlightening us.
 

😂

  • Like 3
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, neopolaris said:

Herd immunity is something that happens naturally

That, I'm not sure about. "Herd Immunity" is a concept, possibly just a statistical one. "There's enough of us have had it and got over it that the race will survive."

It's I'm alright Jack, but spare a thought for all those sacrificed to achieve that "herd immunity".

Edited by Profaitchikenz Haiku
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I think I need to see a few studies which back up your assertions.

Herd immunity is a form of indirect protection from infectious disease that can occur with some diseases when a sufficient percentage of a population has become immune to an infection, whether through vaccination or previous infections, thereby reducing the likelihood of infection for individuals who lack immunity.  So first off, it's not a vaccination.  The shot doesn't  contain the virus, and secondly it doesn't make you immune.  I'm surprised people don't know this.  Fauci has said it's purpose is to reduce the symptoms.

Edited by neopolaris
extra word
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depending who you listen to, some countries may have already reached the fabled herd immunity:

Quote

 

respected immunologists say the concept of herd immunity is widely misunderstood — and in fact the conditions for its attainment in the U.S. may be close or already have been reached.

That's because the level of vaccination in much of the country already has been sufficient to drive the levels of infection steadily lower and foster a consistent reduction in new cases.

Indeed, the daily average of new cases per capita, compiled by the Washington Post, has fallen over the last seven days in all but five states. In two of the five, Wyoming and Maine, the figure rose by only 1% and in a third, New Mexico, it was flat.

What's causing confusion, experts say, is that laypersons tend to equate herd immunity with the complete eradication of the virus.

"That's not what infectious disease doctors mean by 'herd immunity,'" says Dr. Monica Gandhi, a professor of medicine at UC San Francisco. "Unfortunately, we've only eradicated a single virus in the history of mankind, and that is smallpox."

 

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/column-stop-fretting-herd-immunity-140628207.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be more concerned with the ingredients than misused terminology like herd immunity and the recently redefined word, vaccination. 

The State of Connecticut has released the ingredients for people to see.  The Moderna one has an interesting ingredient to say the least. Notice the SM-102

https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Coronavirus/Community_Resources/Vaccinations/Print-Materials/Fact-Sheets/Ingredients_English.pdf

 

Here is the MSDS for SM-102.

https://www.caymanchem.com/msdss/33474m.pdf

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Profaitchikenz Haiku said:

That, I'm not sure about. "Herd Immunity" is a concept, possibly just a statistical one. "There's enough of us have had it and got over it that the race will survive."

Herd immunity is real. Imagine a herd of people, all of whom have immunity from a particular infectious disease. Someone with that disease comes along and into the herd. Who does the disease spread to? It has nowhere to go where it can take hold.

If some of the people in the herd don't have immunity, then the disease might infect one or two of them, but then where does it go? Those with the disease will either die or get over it, leaving the herd disease free.

That's what herd immunity is, and I've read that it occurs at around 2 thirds of the herd. Our herd being our country's population for starters, and then the world. Of course, a lot depends on how long the immunity to covid-19 lasts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Phil Deakins said:

Herd immunity is real.

All concepts have some degree of reality, money for example, or truth, or unicorns. We can think and talk about them, write books about them, manipulate the ideas to merge them with or differentiate them from other concepts,  but they are nevertheless products of the human thought system. You can believe in them, or you can deny their existence. Try going without oxygen for an hour, on the other hand. That's real.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Got my first jab on the 10th, Pfizer, a bit tired and sleepy next day (more than usual anyway), sore arm.

I'll get second dose the June 7th, lets see how it goes, everybody saying that is the second that puts you down a bit.

 

Anyway, vaccines are wonderful, and I'm hopeful life will get to some degree of normal  in the near future, we'll just have another virus around like influenza. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Herd immunity......the resistance to the spread of a contagious disease within a population that results if a sufficiently high proportion of individuals are immune to the disease, especially through vaccination.

Immunity......a condition of being able to resist a particular disease especially through preventing development of a pathogenic microorganism or by counteracting the effects of its products...ya know, like with a vaccine.

Vaccine.......a preparation of genetic material (such as a strand of synthesized messenger RNA) that is used by the cells of the body to produce an antigenic substance (such as a fragment of virus spike protein)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 337 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...