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18 hours ago, Sorciaa said:
21 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

I was finally able to get my first shot yesterday!  Pfizer.  Arm a little sore and quarter-sized bruise, but otherwise fine.

Things are ramping up. 12 to 15 year-olds eligible next week.  Fingers crossed we reach herd immunity...

https://twitter.com/nowthisnews/status/1390122392375087104?s=20

 

thats great Luna.. I got my 2nd march 5th.. Moderna and the 2nd kicked my butt for 24 hours.. sick as a dog, but totally worth it to be vaccinated. 🤘

Fantastic...you are done!  Yeah I wouldn't care if I got extremely sick really.

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I had my second jab this afternoon, so the WiFi transmitter software should be activated by now. But, damn, I still have to use my keyboard to get this message in this thread. If that's still t

A vaccine needn't contain the virus to confer some degree of immunity. It need only elicit an immune response against the virus. That's precisely what mRNA and viral vector vaccines do (the only types

For me it is very simple. I have 2 very good general practitioners, that I fully trust. And they have invited me for the vaccinations. That means they think it is in my best interest to take them. W

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14 hours ago, Eddy Vortex said:

I had my first shot of Moderna a week ago.  It made me sleepy for the night and I had soreness at the injection site for two days.

I'm due for a second one in a couple weeks. I've been advised to drink plenty of water before going in and move your arm around to ward off some soreness. Wished someone had told me that before I had my first one. haha

Yeah I think my arm was overly tense and this is why I had pain and a bruise...going to massage my arm before the 2nd shot.  I had kind of 'left the building' in my mind though, as the whole process of an auditorium of people looking at me get the vaccine (because I was at the edge of the vaccine tables and facing all the people waiting to make sure they didn't have an allergic reaction), plus the presence of some kind of military (maybe the National Guard), plus my worries of getting Covid from all these possibly infected people, made me nervous. The person giving my shot said "is this you with your arm relaxed and at your side"? lol  Then I realized my arm was way high and so tense!

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8 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

They have us working 6 days a week right now and more than likely until September.. So I'm probably going to have to work my shots around my vacation days..

We get more of those in July, so it's going to be a couple months before i can get my first one done..

Wow won't that place give you time off to get vaccinated?!  I was just reading about so many vaccine-resistant people in Tennessee, so likely the rate of Covid will be higher there. Hopefully, their beloved Dolly (posted above) will convince some.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/30/health/covid-vaccine-hesitancy-white-republican.html

"Communities like Greeneville and its surroundings — rural, overwhelmingly Republican, deeply Christian, 95 percent white — are on the radar of President Biden and American health officials, as efforts to vaccinate most of the U.S. population enters a critical phase. These are the places where polls show resistance to the vaccine is most entrenched. While campaigns aimed at convincing Black and Latino urban communities to set aside their vaccine mistrust have made striking gains, towns like these will also have to be convinced if the country is to achieve widespread immunity".

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Finally got my first shot! Earlier than expected. A bit ill for a couple of days (and I don't know if it's my imagination or not, but it felt like a new kind of illness I hadn't experienced before; not like a normal cold or virus) and very tired, and my arm was sore for a bit longer than that, but now fine. Second jab booked for July.

I made a bit of a twit of myself in the vaccination station. I was just so overcome that out of all the pandemics in human history, I'm in this one, where a vaccine was developed very quickly and then rolled out efficiently, thanks to the wonderful NHS that we are so lucky to have. I felt so grateful that I actually started crying a little bit. The nurse was very nice about it.

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I've had two shots (AstraZeneca).  Sore arm and felt a bit bleh for a couple of days after each one, but nothing serious.

It certainly gives me a lot more confidence, though I will, of course, continue to comply with my government's various restrictions and recommendations.

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I had my 2nd Pfizer shot three weeks ago. I felt absolutely nothing for either shot. That's been typical of shots in general for me. I did get a sore arm from a tetanus shot five or so years ago. That was the exception.

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5 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

Wow won't that place give you time off to get vaccinated?!  I was just reading about so many vaccine-resistant people in Tennessee, so likely the rate of Covid will be higher there. Hopefully, their beloved Dolly (posted above) will convince some.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/30/health/covid-vaccine-hesitancy-white-republican.html

"Communities like Greeneville and its surroundings — rural, overwhelmingly Republican, deeply Christian, 95 percent white — are on the radar of President Biden and American health officials, as efforts to vaccinate most of the U.S. population enters a critical phase. These are the places where polls show resistance to the vaccine is most entrenched. While campaigns aimed at convincing Black and Latino urban communities to set aside their vaccine mistrust have made striking gains, towns like these will also have to be convinced if the country is to achieve widespread immunity".

I was really hoping this thread wasn't gonna get political. I knew I should have just not said a word.

I guess, IBTL

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16 minutes ago, Ceka Cianci said:

I was really hoping this thread wasn't gonna get political. I knew I should have just not said a word.

I guess, IBTL

Some people just cannot restrain themselves - everything must be politicized.

 

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I'm still on the fence about getting the vaccine.  So far I am holding out against it, and have the luxury of living somewhere where it doesn't have a big community impact.  That is one reason for my reluctance.  The other is that vaccines usually take many years to be approved for use and side effects are often know by then.  I don't believe enough is known about possible reactions to this one and that makes me nervous.  Time will tell and until then, I'm staying on the fence.

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1 hour ago, Ceka Cianci said:
7 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

Wow won't that place give you time off to get vaccinated?!  I was just reading about so many vaccine-resistant people in Tennessee, so likely the rate of Covid will be higher there. Hopefully, their beloved Dolly (posted above) will convince some.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/30/health/covid-vaccine-hesitancy-white-republican.html

"Communities like Greeneville and its surroundings — rural, overwhelmingly Republican, deeply Christian, 95 percent white — are on the radar of President Biden and American health officials, as efforts to vaccinate most of the U.S. population enters a critical phase. These are the places where polls show resistance to the vaccine is most entrenched. While campaigns aimed at convincing Black and Latino urban communities to set aside their vaccine mistrust have made striking gains, towns like these will also have to be convinced if the country is to achieve widespread immunity".

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I was really hoping this thread wasn't gonna get political. I knew I should have just not said a word.

I guess, IBTL

My intention is for people to report their vaccination experience.

I simply wanted you to know what was happening in your neck of the woods and so quoted a paragraph from the NYT that describes the situation (regarding vaccine hesitancy, and why) in Tennessee...it was purely descriptive. Getting political would be me arguing about *my" side vs another political side, but I was merely reporting the situation on the ground.

In any case, it's not 'getting political' per se that closes a thread...it's when we insult the 'other' side ....ad hominem attacks and the like.

I hope you can get vaccinated soon...from what I read it's pretty bad there with major spread.

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5 minutes ago, Jordan Whitt said:

I'm still on the fence about getting the vaccine.  So far I am holding out against it, and have the luxury of living somewhere where it doesn't have a big community impact.  That is one reason for my reluctance.  The other is that vaccines usually take many years to be approved for use and side effects are often know by then.  I don't believe enough is known about possible reactions to this one and that makes me nervous.  Time will tell and until then, I'm staying on the fence.

I might be more hesitant about getting a vaccine if I lived in NZ as it's so much more under control there.

The thing about this vaccine though is that the technology has been in development for around 10 years, and it's only been tailored to respond to Covid...kind of tweaked...and so it really wasn't as rushed as some believe. I had your concerns in the beginning too until I studied it more.

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4 hours ago, Innula Zenovka said:

I've had two shots (AstraZeneca).  Sore arm and felt a bit bleh for a couple of days after each one, but nothing serious.

It certainly gives me a lot more confidence, though I will, of course, continue to comply with my government's various restrictions and recommendations.

I read somewhere (sorry can't remember where) that AstraZeneca might even be more effective with one of the new mutations. We didn't have that option where I live ...couldn't even get the Moderna one here due to a problem in the supply chain.

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10 hours ago, Jordan Whitt said:

I'm still on the fence about getting the vaccine.  So far I am holding out against it, and have the luxury of living somewhere where it doesn't have a big community impact.  That is one reason for my reluctance.  The other is that vaccines usually take many years to be approved for use and side effects are often know by then.  I don't believe enough is known about possible reactions to this one and that makes me nervous.  Time will tell and until then, I'm staying on the fence.

Plenty, though, is known about possible reactions to Covid-19, including the danger of death and of "long covid."

What, if anything, do you think would cause you to conclude that the known risks of not being vaccinated begin to outweigh the -- as yet, completely unknown and possibly non-existent -- risks of being vaccinated, and what criteria other than advice from the competent medical authorities will you take into account in reaching your decision?

 

Edited by Innula Zenovka
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I could have had the vaccine already, but I have have waited some weeks, to see if AstraZeneca is stopped permanently.

I have diagnoses that put me earlier in the line for vaccine. I have also had a blood clout some years ago, and the AstraZeneca frightened me. Today, the FHI(Norwegian health institute) recommended full stop in AstraZeneca and also Janssen. https://www.dagensmedisin.no/artikler/2021/05/10/dette-er-ekspertutvalgets-vaksinedom/

And 16 th April FHI said: In Norway today, there will generally be a greater risk of dying by being vaccinated with the AstraZeneca vaccine, than the risk of dying from covid disease, according to FHI. "This means that we will expose younger women to an unreasonably high risk by offering the vaccine to this group, given the current level of infection in Norway." "

"For women in the age group 45-49 years, there must be a delay in the vaccination program of 79 weeks before the risk of dying from the coronavirus outweighs the risk of death by being vaccinated with the AstraZeneca vaccine."

https://www.vg.no/nyheter/innenriks/i/lERn2A/derfor-ville-fhi-droppe-astrazeneca-vaksinen

I feel safer now, when I know with 100% certainty that I am not going to get the AstraZeneca. But I will wait a week, because I have started on a new medication for one of my other diagnoses, that gave me severe side effects. I want to be fully recovered from those side effects before I add the vaccine to my body.

 

 

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One of the main considerations in the UK -- indeed, the paramount consideration, at least as far as the Government's scientific advisors tell us -- is to reduce the number of fatalities caused by the pandemic, and especially to avoid the loss of life that would be caused by the Health Service being overwhelmed and unable to cope with the multiple pressures caused by Covid-19, thus endangering not only patients with Covid but all patients needing urgent hospital treatment (and, as I understand it, there was a time in late January or early February when we were dangerously close to that point).

Infection levels are now well under control, back where they were last summer, but it's hoped that this time round, because of the successful vaccination programme, that we can gradually re-open without risking a large increase in infections and, perhaps more importantly, no comparable increase in the rate of hospitalisation as a result of Covid, because the vaccination both helps reduce the risk of infection and, should someone nevertheless become infected after being vaccinated, their  symptoms are far less likely to be so severe they'll require hospital treatment, which is good news both for them and for anyone who does actually require a regular hospital or an ICU bed for whatever reason.

So I can see why medical advice varies from country to country.

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My first AZ shot a few weeks ago kicked my butt for the next 48+ hours .. got it around noon on a Friday and the next day felt miserable, barely slept that night. Saturday I popped Tylenol and that helped. It was only Monday I felt fully better. Second dose in July.

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I am 100% for tested and true vaccines, but I am a skeptic when it comes to vaccines that is developed under time pressure. Dangerous side effects may take some time to show up. I have the luxury of living where it is a low level of infection. Was I living in New York or another place with a massive amount of infection and death, I would see it differently.

Only Norway and Denmark has stopped these vaccines.

I am actually 90% sure that I had Covid 1 year ago, but how to find out? I also think it is best for me to get the vaccine, in case the mutated virus spread all over the world.

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3 minutes ago, Marianne Little said:

I am 100% for tested and true vaccines, but I am a skeptic when it comes to vaccines that is developed under time pressure. Dangerous side effects may take some time to show up. I have the luxury of living where it is a low level of infection. Was I living in New York or another place with a massive amount of infection and death, I would see it differently.

Only Norway and Denmark has stopped these vaccines.

I am actually 90% sure that I had Covid 1 year ago, but how to find out? I also think it is best for me to get the vaccine, in case the mutated virus spread all over the world.

This kind of vaccine was already being worked on years before the pandemic.. The pandemic is what caused the research to finally get the funding and attention that was needed, plus the pandemic probably helped to skip a bunch of red tape as well..

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It can be difficult to weigh risks and benefits. I declined going for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine given at a drive-thru location due to its less efficacy in preventing Covid and the rare blot-clot findings. But it might have been the better choice due to all the exposure I had in a huge building filled with a big crowd that day offering the Pfizer one -- likely there were a few virus particles floating in the air somewhere.  Fingers crossed.

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1 hour ago, Innula Zenovka said:

Plenty, though, is known about possible reactions to Covid-19, including the danger of death and of "long covid."

What, if anything, do you think would cause you to conclude that the known risks of not being vaccinated begin to outweigh the -- as yet, completely unknown and possibly non-existent -- risks of being vaccinated, and what criteria other than advice from the competent medical authorities will you take into account in reaching your decision?

 

As I said at the start of my post...I live in a country with 27 active cases of Covid and all of them are people who came into the country and are in managed isolation, so right now (at least) the risk of not being vaccinated is kinda low.  Will I change my mind if things change?  We shall see.

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