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It is very important to relax your arm muscles when you get the jab.
Just let it hang relaxed next to your body. No muscle tension at all.
And then, don't give it a second thought if possible.
 

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4 minutes ago, Sid Nagy said:

It is very important to relax your arm muscles when you get the jab.
Just let it hang relaxed next to your body. No muscle tension at all.
And then, don't give it a second thought if possible.
 

I did. My pharmacist was impressed with how relaxed my arm  was but it still hurt once he started pushing the fluid in. The needle going in doesn't bother me. The fluid going in hurts like hell on someone who is 5' 3" and 115 lbs. Might not be a whole lot of muscle but there isn't any fat either.

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15 minutes ago, Silent Mistwalker said:

I did. My pharmacist was impressed with how relaxed my arm  was but it still hurt once he started pushing the fluid in. The needle going in doesn't bother me. The fluid going in hurts like hell on someone who is 5' 3" and 115 lbs. Might not be a whole lot of muscle but there isn't any fat either.

It could be the pH value (acidity) of your body as well.
The average person has a pH value between 7.35-7.45.  So they make vaccines with pH values around 7.4

Same goes with insulin injections. I'm a diabetic and use insulin and normally that is no big deal to inject once you are used to do it. But there are days when the bodies pH values are higher or lower than average.
Then the insulin burns like hell when injected.
Case of bad luck.

Edited by Sid Nagy
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Got Pfizer on Saturday and arm was sore for the first 2 days but I didn't get any side effects and now the soreness is all gone.. but I do hear the second dose people got more of the side effects.

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I was able to move my shoulder again once the pain subsided on the third day but the headache lingered on the fourth day. It's that blasted second shot.

My sister got the Pfizer. First shot went okay, but had soreness, mild fever and chills with the second.  

My other sister got Moderna.  She had mild soreness from the first shot and two days of worse pain in the arm from the second. No fever and chills for her though.

My father got Moderna and only had mild pain from the second shot. My mother also got Moderna and had no sufferings nor malaise with both shots. Go figure.

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14 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

I've had shots that didn't hurt and shots that hurt the whole day..

I think some people just give shots better.. hehehe

 

14 hours ago, Sid Nagy said:

It could be the pH value (acidity) of your body as well.
The average person has a pH value between 7.35-7.45.  So they make vaccines with pH values around 7.4

Same goes with insulin injections. I'm a diabetic and use insulin and normally that is no big deal to inject once you are used to do it. But there are days when the bodies pH values are higher or lower than average.
Then the insulin burns like hell when injected.
Case of bad luck.

I did not know that about pH; that might explain a few things about my testosterone injections. Those always hurt at least a bit, since it's such a big thing with a fat needle, but sometimes it hurts more than others with an ache for a day or two and sometimes it feels like burning. I used to think that on those occasions maybe the needle nicked a nerve on the way in, but perhaps it's just about what my body pH happens to be on any given day. 

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Back in 2019 my SO and I spent around $1200 updating our vaccinations, they had no problems with any of them and none with the two Moderna shots we got. I on the other hand always have a reaction to shots, and my two Moderna shots were no different than any other vaccine I have ever gotten, slightly sore for a couple days, and that’s it. And when I got my second shot they told me it usually has grater reaction than the first shot, I found just the opposite.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

i do no take any protection measures against the virus almost since the beginning.

i live alone and do not socialize at all.

perhaps because of that i do no seem to be in danger.

so i would like not to take a vaccine whatsoever.

i do not think vaccines will get obligatory for everbody.

then again i'm thinkning perhaps i should get a job this summer .

in which case perhaps self tests would not be enough.

i might be obliged to take a vaccine and am worried if this would be dangerous.

 

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i haven't had my vaccination yet. I am in Group 4 General Population (people not at risk of getting sick). Us Group 4s can get from the end of July

last week I had to put my car into the garage and they kept it for 5 days - wonky electricals and computer. So for those days, I had to walk, then get the bus, then get two trains, then walk. And back again every day. walk, train, train, bus, walk

people have been asked to keep wearing masks on the trains and buses, even if they had been vaccinated, as a courtesy to every one else until everybody who wants a vaccination can get one. And everybody on the buses and trains I went on were wearing masks, which I thought was pretty cool

i talked to some people on the transport like you do. And most of them said they are going to keep wearing their masks on the public transport, as they have been less sick, because mask, over the last 18 months or so from things like colds, sniffles and flu than at anytime ever in the times before. Which I thought was pretty interesting

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I am in the group 4 so I haven't got a call for the vaccine yet, but my doctor did recommend to not take the vaccine anyway because of one of my kidneys being extroflexed and thus at risk of collapsing by trying to filter a couple of byproduct substances used during the purification process that normal kidneys should have no problem processing, but my kidney reaction remains unknown and could possibly collapse badly and stop working 🙁

Edited by OptimoMaximo
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4 hours ago, examining said:

i do no take any protection measures against the virus almost since the beginning.

i live alone and do not socialize at all.

perhaps because of that i do no seem to be in danger.

so i would like not to take a vaccine whatsoever.

i do not think vaccines will get obligatory for everbody.

then again i'm thinkning perhaps i should get a job this summer .

in which case perhaps self tests would not be enough.

i might be obliged to take a vaccine and am worried if this would be dangerous.

 

Up to you, of course, but personally, just looking at the figures, I'm certainly not regretting taking my chances with the vaccine rather than the disease -- the known risk of contracting Covid if someone remains unvaccinated, and then, at the very least, experiencing, possibly in hospital, something considerably more unpleasant than the side effects of the vaccine, and with potentially far graver consequences, including lasting physical damage or death, seems so much greater than any risk posed by the vaccine.

 

 

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8 hours ago, examining said:

i live alone and do not socialize at all.

perhaps because of that i do no seem to be in danger.

so i would like not to take a vaccine whatsoever.

Well don't forget that we're never as isolated as we might think we are.

During the pandemic I've had all sorts of appliances break down where I had exposure to repair people working in my home, and I also had to make several trips to the vet with sick kitties. Not to mention some unmasked neighbor who was suddenly up in my face as I walked to my car.

You could have a medical emergency yourself and need hospitalization. Or need dental care (as I desperately do, and it's next on my list).

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10 hours ago, Mollymews said:

i haven't had my vaccination yet. I am in Group 4 General Population (people not at risk of getting sick). Us Group 4s can get from the end of July

last week I had to put my car into the garage and they kept it for 5 days - wonky electricals and computer. So for those days, I had to walk, then get the bus, then get two trains, then walk. And back again every day. walk, train, train, bus, walk

people have been asked to keep wearing masks on the trains and buses, even if they had been vaccinated, as a courtesy to every one else until everybody who wants a vaccination can get one. And everybody on the buses and trains I went on were wearing masks, which I thought was pretty cool

i talked to some people on the transport like you do. And most of them said they are going to keep wearing their masks on the public transport, as they have been less sick, because mask, over the last 18 months or so from things like colds, sniffles and flu than at anytime ever in the times before. Which I thought was pretty interesting

Funny you should mention that. People in other countries (China!) have been doing just that since the 50s. Over 6 decades. They learned the hard way and have incorporated it into their culture. I'm still waiting for the rest of the world to catch up.

https://www.voanews.com/science-health/coronavirus-outbreak/not-just-coronavirus-asians-have-worn-face-masks-decades

Edited by Silent Mistwalker
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12 hours ago, examining said:

then again i'm thinkning perhaps i should get a job this summer .

in which case perhaps self tests would not be enough.

i might be obliged to take a vaccine and am worried if this would be dangerous.

If you need a vaccine for a summer job, you ideally wanted your first dose a month or so ago so that you'd be getting your second right now. This is the issue with waiting. It takes months to get both doses and for your immune system to do the thing. If you wait until you want to take that trip, get a job or the infection rates rise, you're late at that point.

Still get it as soon as possible though, because being a few weeks into the first dose is better than nothing.

Note that the things discussed in this thread are hurting arms and fever and the like. Not feeling great is a bit uncomfortable, rather than dangerous. In contrast, the reactive arthritis I got from the actual virus could leave me with permanent damage. At best, it means I was sick for over a year and still recovering. I went from being healthy and active to barely being able to walk.

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as i said, for an unknown reason it seems that i definitely am immune.

perhaps because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus.

It is a fact though that i do not use any protection measures at all that is, after the first month of awe.

that's also, why i wonder if in my case a vaccine could have the opposite impact instead of the one of therapy. 

besides, there are plenty of proven examples when a vaccine provoked collapse and even death in healthy or -otherwise- sick people, young and old.

nevertheless the act and the need will decide -as usually- about this dilemma.

how long has it been the corona virus pandemic?  one year and a half already?  i am one year and a half -lucky me- safe without any protection measures whatsoever.

and i am actually checking job posts ads right now :-)

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1 hour ago, examining said:

as i said, for an unknown reason it seems that i definitely am immune.

perhaps because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus.

besides, there are plenty of proven examples when a vaccine provoked collapse and even death in healthy or -otherwise- sick people, young and old.

🤔

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experimental

1 hour ago, examining said:

as i said, for an unknown reason it seems that i definitely am immune.

perhaps because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus.

Good question. I do think some people have natural immunity to it. I've been exposed more then once and nada. Quarantined and never felt ill.  My man same thing except for a light cold type thing.  When we went to get our jabs --- he got his but for me I was told since I was taking an experimental MS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) drug they wanted me to do some anti-body tests and told they were strong enough to repel the Covid. They will do tests on a regular basis and if they think I need a boost --- jab time!

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3 hours ago, examining said:

as i said, for an unknown reason it seems that i definitely am immune.

perhaps because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus.

It is a fact though that i do not use any protection measures at all that is, after the first month of awe.

That's not what you said earlier, though.    Then you said that you

On 6/15/2021 at 6:33 AM, examining said:

live alone and do not socialize at all.

 So you have been taking one of the main protective measures, social distancing.

That, combined with good fortune, seems to me a far more likely explanation for your continued good health than any hypothetical immunity you've developed because you happen to suffer from asthma (something I'm pretty sure the medical statisticians would have noticed by now if it was enjoyed by many people).

Why don't you ask your regular doctor whether they'd advise you to get a vaccination?        

ETA:   I think it's important to remember that we're talking about risks and probabilities, not certainties.     You reduce the risk of contracting the virus by avoiding contact with people, which you have been doing.  That's good, but it's something you have to keep on doing, every day, and it must follow that the likelihood of your coming into contact with a carrier despite your best efforts must increase over time  -- that is, you have to be lucky every time  you leave your home, but the virus has to be lucky only once.

If you are vaccinated, however, that pulls the risk way down to a few percentage points of what is if you're unvaccinated, and, should you be really unfortunate and contract the disease despite being vaccinated, similarly reduces the risk of your experiencing severe symptoms (or worse).

When you're dealing with something so potentially dangerous as Covid, doesn't it make sense to stack the odds in your favour as much as possible?      

 

Edited by Innula Zenovka
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4 hours ago, examining said:

because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus

No, you don't. That's not how it works.

And what you wrote here is very dangerous.

Our immune system can be roughly divided into two part: innate and adaptive.

The innate is rather aspecific and its efficiency against particular pathogen species may vary a lot among individuals. If you (presumably) have COPD, your innate immune system is generally not very good (and actually contributes to your disease). Also, your innate immunity actually works less efficient against many other viral infections.

Then there's the adaptive immune system. If you never encountered this coronavirus before, you are very unlikely to have any immunity from this branch - no antibodies, no cytotoxic T-cell response, no memory cells. If you are lucky, you have some cross-immunity from past infections with other human coronaviruses. But definitely do not bet your life on it, because the data is very limited. It's also possible that you have never seen any other coronaviruses and there is no practical way to find out if you have.

If you have COPD, you are at a much much higher risk than anyone else. Do NOT assume you have developed immunity, especially not because of this chronic respiratory disease. Quite the contrary. With such a pre-existing condition, your life is much more at risk when contracting SARS-CoV-2 and developing COVID-19 that the average person.

So please do not suggest that chronic respiratory disease contributes to immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems on an internet forum like this or anywhere public. You may not only be endangering yourself, but also other people with similar conditions.

So let me repeat this here. And this is important:

If you have COPD, asthma, diabetes, or any other chronic disease, you are way more at risk from dying from COVID-19, or suffering long term or even permanent tissue damage than other people. And you should definitely get vaccinated. You were probably the first to be eligible to vaccination, immediately after approval of the vaccines by your government health authorities earlier this year. So, if you haven't been vaccinated yet, I highly recommend you do, for your own sake. Especially now that a dramatically more contagious strain(the Delta variant) is spreading rapidly world-wide.

[Update] If you really have COPD or some similar chronic disease, it's safe to assume that you are subject to regular medical check-ups by your local physician, who should already have given you a very similar lecture and have urged you to get vaccinated at the beginning of the year. So I'm really surprised by the suggestions you made in this thread.

Edited by Arduenn Schwartzman
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7 hours ago, examining said:

as i said, for an unknown reason it seems that i definitely am immune.

perhaps because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus.

If you are using an inhaler for your chronic respiratory disease, then there is a good possibility that the protective effect is coming from that rather than just luck or natural immunity. Research was inspired after reports of COVID-19 hospital emissions showed that patients with chronic respiratory disease were significantly underrepresented. It  was hypothesized that the widespread use among these patients of inhaled glucocorticoids, a type of corticosteroid, was behind this trend. A couple of studies at least have looked at this and showed some promising data.

A common asthma medication that can be used at home might be an effective treatment for early COVID-19 in adults, according to a study published in The Lancet medical journal.

University of Oxford researchers found that patients who took the drug budesonide when their first COVID-19 symptoms started were less likely to need urgent medical care or hospitalization, and had a shorter recovery time. It also reduced the chance of persistent symptoms and fever.

The randomized controlled trial involved 146 adults within seven days of the onset of mild COVID-19 symptoms. Half of the participants inhaled budesonide twice a day until their symptoms resolved, and the other half received the usual care given based on age, gender and existing illnesses.

In the budesonide group, only one person needed urgent medical care, compared to 10 people in the group who received the standard care for COVID-19.

https://www.dw.com/en/asthma-drug-brings-hope-for-covid-19-treatment/a-57174301

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8 hours ago, examining said:

as i said, for an unknown reason it seems that i definitely am immune.

perhaps because i already have a chronic respiratory disease (kind of asthma) possibly i developed immunity to all sorts of respiratory problems including the corona virus.

It is a fact though that i do not use any protection measures at all that is, after the first month of awe.

that's also, why i wonder if in my case a vaccine could have the opposite impact instead of the one of therapy. 

besides, there are plenty of proven examples when a vaccine provoked collapse and even death in healthy or -otherwise- sick people, young and old.

nevertheless the act and the need will decide -as usually- about this dilemma.

how long has it been the corona virus pandemic?  one year and a half already?  i am one year and a half -lucky me- safe without any protection measures whatsoever.

and i am actually checking job posts ads right now :-)

Thats not how that works.. Thats not how ANY of that works! There is no virus in the vaccine. Good grief.. Get the shot, please. 

1 hour ago, Arielle Popstar said:

If you are using an inhaler for your chronic respiratory disease, then there is a good possibility that the protective effect is coming from that rather than just luck or natural immunity.

Thats treatment, not a protection.. also, inhalers dont protect against viruses, vaccines do though. 

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2 hours ago, Arielle Popstar said:

If you are using an inhaler for your chronic respiratory disease, then there is a good possibility that the protective effect is coming from that rather than just luck or natural immunity. Research was inspired after reports of COVID-19 hospital emissions showed that patients with chronic respiratory disease were significantly underrepresented.

Because they stayed at home in fear for their lives.

Respiratory conditions do that to you, they do not give you covid super powers.

 

2 hours ago, Arielle Popstar said:

It  was hypothesized that the widespread use among these patients of inhaled glucocorticoids, a type of corticosteroid, was behind this trend. A couple of studies at least have looked at this and showed some promising data.

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7 minutes ago, Rowan Amore said:

Since many treatments for respiratory disease include steroids, wouldn't that make one MORE susceptible to infection of any kind and not less?

Since steroids are a form of immune suppressant it would absolutely make anyone taking them more susceptible. 

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