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7 hours ago, Jaylinbridges said:

So you are attacking me for stating an accepted definition of a conservative?   From the Cambridge Dictionary:

conservative

US /kənˈsɝː.və.t̬ɪv/ 

UK /kənˈsɜː.və.tɪv/

conservative adjective (AGAINST CHANGE)
 
not usually liking or trusting change, especially sudden change:
a conservative society/outlook
Older people tend to be more conservative and a little suspicious of anything new.
 
If you are conservative in your appearance, you usually do not like fashionable or modern clothes or hairstyles:
He's a very conservative dresser - he always looks like he's wearing his father's clothes!
 More examples

I disagreed  with you for making an absolute statement that you cannot prove.  You post some definition that fit your narrative. Big EFFing deal.  That does not prove your statement.  Especially in todays world. What you defined applied to clothing and hairstyles.  We all know you were trying to dis conservative political THINKERS.  They are not the same thing. 

Enjoy thinking you're smarter than everyone in the room.  

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10 hours ago, Jaylinbridges said:

So you are attacking me for stating an accepted definition of a conservative?   From the Cambridge Dictionary:

conservative

US /kənˈsɝː.və.t̬ɪv/ 

UK /kənˈsɜː.və.tɪv/

conservative adjective (AGAINST CHANGE)
 
not usually liking or trusting change, especially sudden change:
a conservative society/outlook
Older people tend to be more conservative and a little suspicious of anything new.
 
If you are conservative in your appearance, you usually do not like fashionable or modern clothes or hairstyles:
He's a very conservative dresser - he always looks like he's wearing his father's clothes!
 More examples

That red bolded part is not part of the definition. It's an example of how to use the word. 🙄

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1 hour ago, Silent Mistwalker said:
conservative adjective (AGAINST CHANGE)
 
not usually liking or trusting change, especially sudden change

Struggling for points?  I think the definition is clear.

1 hour ago, Silent Mistwalker said:

Older people tend to be more conservative and a little suspicious of anything new.

So let's substitute the definition of the adjective conservative  in their example sentence:

Older people tend to be more against change and a little suspicious of anything new.

You can do better than that .

 

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4 minutes ago, Jaylinbridges said:

Struggling for points?  I think the definition is clear.

So let's substitute the definition of the adjective conservative  in their example sentence:

Older people tend to be more against change and a little suspicious of anything new.

You can do better than that .

 

How about you stop with the strawman arguments along with the stereotyping. 

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200313-how-your-personality-changes-as-you-age

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11 minutes ago, Silent Mistwalker said:

How about you stop with the strawman arguments along with the stereotyping. 

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200313-how-your-personality-changes-as-you-age

So, that article agrees that personalities change as you get older, and generally become more resistant to change.  Thanks for confirming that.

I know many more older folks than you do, and I watch them change.  At some point they become almost intolerable with their views (Trump is God).  You do realize I have a few years on you, about 20 years actually.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Rowan Amore said:

Just agree or they'll beat it to death.  CAPS will be next.

hi i am nolly and if you beat me oh mother *****er i will beat the hell out of you so by beaches.

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1 hour ago, Jaylinbridges said:

So, that article agrees that personalities change as you get older, and generally become more resistant to change.  Thanks for confirming that.

I know many more older folks than you do, and I watch them change.  At some point they become almost intolerable with their views (Trump is God).  You do realize I have a few years on you, about 20 years actually.

 

 

You're 82?

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4 hours ago, Jaylinbridges said:

So, that article agrees that personalities change as you get older, and generally become more resistant to change.  Thanks for confirming that.

I read the article @Silent Mistwalker linked and find no reference at all to people becoming more resistant to change as they get older.

I believe something else got confirmed.

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7 hours ago, Jaylinbridges said:

So, that article agrees that personalities change as you get older, and generally become more resistant to change.  Thanks for confirming that.

I know many more older folks than you do, and I watch them change.  At some point they become almost intolerable with their views (Trump is God).  You do realize I have a few years on you, about 20 years actually.

 

 

Nevertheless, the changes described by the article seem largely for the better:

Quote

We become more conscientious and agreeable, and less neurotic. The levels of the “Dark Triad” personality traits, Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy also tend to go down – and with them, our risk of antisocial behaviours such as crime and substance abuse.

Research has shown that we develop into more altruistic and trusting individuals. Our willpower increases and we develop a better sense of humour. Finally, the elderly have more control over their emotions. It’s arguably a winning combination – and one which suggests that the stereotype of older people as grumpy and curmudgeonly needs some revision.

Far from being fixed in childhood, or around the age of 30 – as experts thought for years – it seems that our personalities are fluid and malleable. “People become nicer and more socially adapted,” says Mõttus. “They’re increasingly able to balance their own expectations of life with societal demands.”

I think you are maybe generalising based on the older people with whom you have frequent contact -- friends, neighbours and family -- than on older people in general.

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I have the feeling Jaylin made the mistake of not noticing who he was replying to and assumed he was replying to Doris in his rush to prove himself correct in all things elderly.  Except he forgot he isn't the only old(er) person on the forum or inworld. My parents would have been older than him if they were still alive, if he really is over 80.

It isn't pleasant to be reminded that pretty much everyone you know and have known your whole life are now gone, including your parents, other family members, friends, bosses and coworkers. None of them ever saw Trump even be elected much less the 4 years of hell (and then some) that he put everyone through. 

Don't even come at me and try to claim I or anyone of my age and older is a Trump supporter simply because we're old. That is utter bullcrap.

Anyway, I was hoping Jay would see his error and apologize but since he has been on the forum since I made that reply yesterday and has made no response I can only assume there will be no apology forthcoming. Something an older, stable person would do but a younger person would try to deflect and deny.

 

 

Edited by Silent Mistwalker
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On 8/27/2021 at 6:31 AM, Sid Nagy said:

SL is mainly to big for the activities that are taking place.
Somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 people online on any given time and more than 54,000 sims.
That means a sim per person online available.
And because people tend to go places where others go to as well, it means a lot of sims are empty. Running idle.
An enormous waist of energy and resources.

LL should introduce home parcels IMHO, running on ones own PC where you can invite 3-4 people when you are online.  It could be a really nice perk for premium plus ( a 4096 m home plot for about USD 20 a month) and it would save them a nice stash of money they now have to pay on idle running sims.

This is it, perfectly. Even the SL's hay day, most sims were empty. You can look at how many sims there were and how much fewer there are now. But how many of those were empty sims people gave up on? How many are still empty?

How many people search for sims they have interest in (like a cyberpunk RP), only to find an empty sim? The sim count doesn't really reflect how well SL is doing. I would even argue it'd be better off with far fewer sims that had more people in them at all times.

I think a large part of trying to shift LL revenue away from tier and towards marketplace was because they knew the model of charging this much money for a sim that's usually empty isn't worth it to most people.

SL's problem is their user to server ratio is bad, You are more likely to randomly teleport into a completely empty sim than you are one with someone on it. But the best solution is to get more people to fill up those sims, but sometimes you can't do that. Just imagine if other games were like that, like Overwatch or TF2, where you keep having to try entering servers thta

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On 8/27/2021 at 6:31 AM, Sid Nagy said:

SL is mainly to big for the activities that are taking place.
Somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 people online on any given time and more than 54,000 sims.
That means a sim per person online available.
And because people tend to go places where others go to as well, it means a lot of sims are empty. Running idle.
An enormous waist of energy and resources.

LL should introduce home parcels IMHO, running on ones own PC where you can invite 3-4 people when you are online.  It could be a really nice perk for premium plus ( a 4096 m home plot for about USD 20 a month) and it would save them a nice stash of money they now have to pay on idle running sims.

This is it, perfectly. Even the SL's hay day, most sims were empty. You can look at how many sims there were and how much fewer there are now. But how many of those were empty sims people gave up on? How many are still empty?

How many people search for sims they have interest in (like a cyberpunk RP), only to find an empty sim? The sim count doesn't really reflect how well SL is doing. I would even argue it'd be better off with far fewer sims that had more people in them at all times.

I think a large part of trying to shift LL revenue away from tier and towards marketplace was because they knew the model of charging this much money for a sim that's usually empty isn't worth it to most people.

SL's problem is their user to server ratio is bad, You are more likely to randomly teleport into a completely empty sim than you are one with someone on it. But the best solution is to get more people to fill up those sims, but sometimes you can't do that. Just imagine if other games were like that, like Overwatch or TF2, where you keep having to try entering servers thta

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On 8/27/2021 at 12:39 PM, Sid Nagy said:

The numbers are slowly but steadily climbing for some time already,

that would be the case if its only non LL owned land. But we can't forget that Belli is also a big region hog.

 

On 8/27/2021 at 1:31 PM, Sid Nagy said:

SL is mainly to big for the activities that are taking place.
Somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 people online on any given time and more than 54,000 sims.
That means a sim per person online available.

I hope i'm not alone in this... but my region isn't meant to get lot of people.. it's my escape from LL, but also for parts of SL. .. just me, and me

Edited by Alwin Alcott
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17 minutes ago, Flea Yatsenko said:

This is it, perfectly. Even the SL's hay day, most sims were empty. You can look at how many sims there were and how much fewer there are now. But how many of those were empty sims people gave up on? How many are still empty?

How many people search for sims they have interest in (like a cyberpunk RP), only to find an empty sim? The sim count doesn't really reflect how well SL is doing. I would even argue it'd be better off with far fewer sims that had more people in them at all times.

I think a large part of trying to shift LL revenue away from tier and towards marketplace was because they knew the model of charging this much money for a sim that's usually empty isn't worth it to most people.

SL's problem is their user to server ratio is bad, You are more likely to randomly teleport into a completely empty sim than you are one with someone on it. But the best solution is to get more people to fill up those sims, but sometimes you can't do that. Just imagine if other games were like that, like Overwatch or TF2, where you keep having to try entering servers thta

For LL the sim count is essential. The main chunk of income for them comes from tier. The other two sources are the premium fees and the L$ to USD and visa versa exchange fees.

If you print the L$ ***** LL does, you can't make a profit out of the marketplace.
The L$ they take is only a sink yo keep the course of the L$ stable and the demand for new ones up, so that the merchants can get a reasonable USD price for their accumulated L$.

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4 minutes ago, Alwin Alcott said:

I hope i'm not alone in this... but my region isn't meant to get lot of people.. it's my escape from LL, but also for parts of SL. .. just me, and me

If every SL user had enough RL money to spare for a sim, SL would have about 60,000 to 100,000 regions online, but would it make SL a more social platform?
Because that is what it should be, a somewhat social platform.

But fact is that a lot of SL inhabitants ain't that social at all (including me): Look at all the high walls, the ban lines, the sky boxes.

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On 8/27/2021 at 10:45 AM, Silent Mistwalker said:

You're 82?

I am back. I don't live on the forums here. I work on Friday, until late, then, at my age I go to bed. And I am an Alt,  because I am not crazy enough to post in this toxic forum with my SL public name.   I also deal with people of all ages in RL and in SL.  I can generalize if I want to, based on many years of dealing with people over 70 years old, before and after I hit that young age.

I am pleased you are not a Trump supporter - we at least agree on one thing.

I was born in 1940 btw.  

Edited by Jaylinbridges
Respect Your Elders!
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On 8/27/2021 at 1:18 PM, Madelaine McMasters said:

I read the article @Silent Mistwalker linked and find no reference at all to people becoming more resistant to change as they get older. I believe something else got confirmed.

That article gave reasons why older people change, but avoided the terms conservative, and the reasons why some old people become more conservative.  Survey a retirement community in Florida, and find out how many consider themselves progressive or liberal.  There are many other studies that both confirm and explain why one generally gets more conservative (and resistant to change) as they age.  Conservatism means resistance to change, the terms are interchangeable.

There are two Americas, and age is the divider People become more conservative by about 45 years old

Why Are Older People More Conservative? Decoding the politics of aging.
 

Quote

 

The first reason is personality. Indeed, a review of 92 scientific studies shows that intellectual curiosity tends to decline in old age and that this decline explains age-related increases in conservatism.

The second is judgment, in particular, information-processing capacity. In most people (and I’m sorry to break the news) the speed of information-processing, a core ingredient of judgment and intelligence, peaks around the mid-20s. To make matters worse, most people become considerably slower after their mid-40s, with a substantial deceleration after their 60s

The third and final reason is familiarity. As we grow older, our experiences become more constrained and predictable. This is partly adaptive; order and structure enable us to navigate the world in autopilot, whereas change requires proactive adaptation, effort, and improvisation. In fact, at any point in life change is disruptive and taxing, but it is especially stressful when we are old. Thus, conservatism increases familiarity, which in turn increases conservatism.

 

I don't think there is anything new in those articles.  But let the attacks on Psychology Today magazine begin...

First article -  Chicago Booth Review publishes research-driven insights on business, policy, and markets. We are a publication of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

 

 

 

Edited by Jaylinbridges
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So how is the aging SL population and their Conservatism related to SL being too big and nothing to do?  

Since I am sure the moderator is looking for a reason to hide my posts.

It's a bit confusing, since Bellisseria, the latest and greatest from SL, is attracting the "elder generation".  They like watching the sunset from their rocking chairs on their safely walled off deck.

Here I thought SL was trying to cater to the Z-generation, and the younger (ahem) Millenniums.  That is where the money is.  Are their any Lindens over 60?  Why did they think the Bellisseria retirement continent would be a success?

I have no answers, only questions. 

 

Edited by Jaylinbridges
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3 minutes ago, Jaylinbridges said:

So how is the aging SL population and their Conservatism related to SL being too big and nothing to do?  

We really have no idea ... 

3 minutes ago, Jaylinbridges said:

It's a bit confusing, since Bellisseria, the latest and greatest from SL, is attracting the "elder generation".  They like watching the sunset from their rocking chairs on their safely walled off deck.

There is no public data to support that assertion.

3 minutes ago, Jaylinbridges said:

Here I thought SL was trying to cater to the Z-generation, and the younger (ahem) Millenniums.  That is where the money is.  Are their any Lindens over 60?  Why did they think the Bellisseria retirement continent would be a success?

Playing house is a primary activity inclusive of all segments of the population regardless of other motivations. Not living next to someone else's random garbage has been the primary driver of rentals on private estates for years. 

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Bellisseria is also, in itself, an attractive environment to explore by foot, motor vehicle, horse, plane, hot air balloon, boat, train, flying dragon or whatever.    I'm quite content, for the time being,  living on a plot tucked away on the regular mainland, Athetis, but I'm really enjoying myself exploring places by road, air and water, now that I've got so much more space to play with my toys.

Edited by Innula Zenovka
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