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Things that make you think 'Wow' : D


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17 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Yeah, it's a pretty wussy hum, but you can get great effects by humming and whistling at the same time -- if you like bagpipe drones, at least. ;) 

I had classmate in Middle School that would do that while pointing fake laser guns at us. 

 

 

In today's fragile world he would be expelled

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Here's one to keep you awake wondering...

You can have one noodle, a single poodle, and a free-spirited doodle if you wish, but can't have just one oodle.  Oodles come in pairs or flocks -- I'm not sure what the correct collective noun is -- but you never find one grazing alone.  They are uncountable and so incredibly social that an isolated one would die of loneliness in seconds.

The same is almost true of caboodles.  I have never seen a caboodle by itself, or accompanied by another caboodle. It makes me wonder where little caboodles come from, or if they do. I get the impression that there may be only one caboodle left in the wild, and it only feels comfortable when led by a single kit.  Don't ask me why.  

Toodles are even stranger.  Except in the UK, I don't think you can have them alone or in packs.  In England, they are rampant and usually plural. Even flippantly so.  Elsewhere, however, they are apparently very shy.  Personally, I have never seen one. You might find one in the loo, I suppose, if we had loos outside the UK.

Now try to get to sleep.

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28 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Here's one to keep you awake wondering...

You can have one noodle, a single poodle, and a free-spirited doodle if you wish, but can't have just one oodle.  Oodles come in pairs or flocks -- I'm not sure what the correct collective noun is -- but you never find one grazing alone.  They are uncountable and so incredibly social that an isolated one would die of loneliness in seconds.

The same is almost true of caboodles.  I have never seen a caboodle by itself, or accompanied by another caboodle. It makes me wonder where little caboodles come from, or if they do. I get the impression that there may be only one caboodle left in the wild, and it only feels comfortable when led by a single kit.  Don't ask me why.  

I remember that 'Oodles' used to be a SL surname...I knew somebody who created an alt called Crispin Oodles xD

But this is very useful, thank you!

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21 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

I used to think that the known universe was just the part of the universe that we discovered so far.. hehehe

Then later learned that we can't be able to see farther than that ,because everything outside of the known universe is traveling faster than the speed of light away from us, So we can't see light outside of it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe

Light is still approaching us from currently unseen distances in the universe, so for the next few billion years we'll get an even more expansive view. While that's happening, the accelerating expansion of the universe will cause more of it to red-shift out of view. Eventually most of the galaxies available to us will vanish, leaving us seeing only our own local group. The cosmic microwave background radiation will fade, so there will no evidence to suggest the big bang. Any future cosmologists around at that time will get the beginning of our universe completely wrong. Today, we can see about 42% of the maximum number of galaxies we'll ever be able to see.

Be thankful we're in the sweet spot.

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While Maddy sees the universe as half full, I see it as half empty.

I'm so mad that there's all that universe I'll never get to see. What if all the nice places are in that part?

Unfair! Unfair, I say!

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7 minutes ago, Lindal Kidd said:

What if all the nice places are in that part?

All the nice places were around when UV was all the rage, but now their suns have died and the inhabitants have moved to the tropics.

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11 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe

Light is still approaching us from currently unseen distances in the universe, so for the next few billion years we'll get an even more expansive view. While that's happening, the accelerating expansion of the universe will cause more of it to red-shift out of view. Eventually most of the galaxies available to us will vanish, leaving us seeing only our own local group. The cosmic microwave background radiation will fade, so there will no evidence to suggest the big bang. Any future cosmologists around at that time will get the beginning of our universe completely wrong. Today, we can see about 42% of the maximum number of galaxies we'll ever be able to see.

Be thankful we're in the sweet spot.

It's kind of sad, but the human race will probably be long gone then.. The next top dog might not even be interested in any of what we are and may even think we wasted a lot of time, if they are even interested in time .. hehehe

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16 hours ago, Rolig Loon said:

Yeah, it's a pretty wussy hum, but you can get great effects by humming and whistling at the same time -- if you like bagpipe drones, at least. ;) 

Dad taught me to make that sound when very young. My ex-hubby would roll his eyes when I'd "fly" his dinner plate to the table while making it.

Mom taught me how to swallow air so I could beat the boys at belching.

I don't think you can be a polymath if you don't know how to do these things.

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3 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

I don't think you can be a polymath if you don't know how to do these things.

Fun fact:   Parrots can be taught to handle basic arithmetic ( see https://stalecheerios.com/conference-notes/mathematical-abilities-african-grey-parrot/ ) , thus qualifying as true Pollymaths.  I find no evidence, however, that parrots can hum or belch.

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On 4/24/2021 at 11:30 PM, Katt Dragoone said:

Saw on a friends post on FB about how dandelions close at night ( or during rain) and open up during daylight

http://gph.is/1WOtGz8source.gif

 

The dandelion is my favorite flower, possibly because it flips me the bird. I love waking the morning after mowing, to see dandelions standing proud above my grass. It's hard to dislike something with that much pluck.

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29 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

I don't think I like how easily you can manipulate me into doing your research for you...  etc. etc...

I will give you the point for burping and farting.  Okay, two points.  That humming demo, however, is pretty thin.  Most of the noise in that clip was a humming air conditioner, which the parrot was accompanying by singing a private lullaby.  Slapping a label on the video to claim that the parrot was responsible for the humming is false advertising.  You've been flim-flammed.

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10 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

The dandelion is my favorite flower, possibly because it flips me the bird. I love waking the morning after mowing, to see dandelions standing proud above my grass. It's hard to dislike something with that much pluck.

From birds to flowers.  Where will it all end?

While we're on a roll, here's another fun linguistic fact.  The name "dandelion" comes almost directly from French, where it means "lion's teeth". Strangely, however, the French often avoid the name dandelion themselves. Instead, they use the much more colorful name Pis-en-lit. If you dissect that name with your first year French dictionary at hand, you'll find that it means "piss in bed".  Strange?  Not really. Dandelion leaves are a fine -- even tasty -- salad garnish, but they are diuretic (look that one up if you really have to).  The French, it seems, are much more straightforward than we are about helpful labelling in foods. 

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20 minutes ago, Love Zhaoying said:
1 hour ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

I don't think I like how easily you can manipulate me into doing your research for you...

 

Expand   Expand   Expand   Expand  

But will they, in nature if not trained?

Birds have nostrils, tongues and vocal cords, so they should be able to block airflow through their mouths and... hum.

And, there's a bird that simply can't avoid it... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRw3zaV5ynE

As for farting and belching, there's this... https://www.popsci.com/environment/article/2009-05/it-true-birds-cant-fart/

Back to humming...
Birds do it.
Bees do it.
I'm still looking for evidence that educated fleas do it. I think it's unlikely. They don't have wings, don't actively breathe, and don't have pumping circulatory systems. They're missing all the hardware that might produce a humming sound as an offshoot of normal activity and I've never read about them rubbing body parts to make noise intentionally.

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While we're still on the topic of birds, Pulitzer Prize winning author John McPhee once said...

"If the call of the loon were of human origin, it would be the laugh of the deeply insane.”

Rolig just offered us oodles of proof.

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
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18 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

While we're still on the topic of birds, Pulitzer Price winning author John McPhee once said...

"If the call of the loon were of human origin, it would be the laugh of the deeply insane.”

Rolig just offered us oodles of proof.

I resemble that remark.

That's an excellent hummingbird video, BTW, not for the humming but for the sequence of the young ones in the nest. The humming is incidental and not vocal in any case.

Now, as to true bird humming...

48 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

Birds have nostrils, tongues and vocal cords, so they should be able to block airflow through their mouths and... hum.

The nub of your assertion seems to rest on the assumption that a bird can block airflow through its mouth. That may or may not be true.  I can't find evidence one way of the other.  We may need an observant chicken farmer to tell us.  However, I doubt it.  After all, birds don't have lips.   Ergo, no hum.

This fascinating discussion just shows you how much exciting information there is out there, if we only take time to ask the right questions to make it show itself.  For example, did you know that birds have one-way lungs? (I only just learned this startling fact, so you'll have to believe http://www.people.eku.edu/ritchisong/birdrespiration.html , which explains it with some very nice animated cartoons.)   

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2 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

The nub of your assertion seems to rest on the assumption that a bird can block airflow through its mouth. That may or may not be true.  I can't find evidence one way of the other.  We may need an observant chicken farmer to tell us.  However, I doubt it.  After all, birds don't have lips.   Ergo, no hum.

You might be right. Nostrils might be used only for smelling, but they might also provide an alternate airway for periods when the mouth is blocked with food. Lips not required.

5 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

This fascinating discussion just shows you how much exciting information there is out there, if we only take time to ask the right questions to make it show itself. 

Yep, and this is why I don't really think I can cite any particular "wow" thing. I'm gleefully running into them all the time.

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