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1 hour ago, AdrianCoffin said:

 I actually smirked to myself when the dead prince died almost a month after these allegations of racism. 

They said that it wasn't the Queen or Prince Philip who had made the comments.

(I know, I was surprised too. We all assumed it was Philip and it might have been better for their PR if they had let us believe it. But they said it wasn't.)

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what gold ? if Meghan had married Harry for the gold then Harry would still be Prince Henry of Wales, Duke of Sussex. And Meghan would be gold diggery happy as Princess Meghan of Wales, Duchess o

Harry is ungrateful and not in touch with how the vast majority lives. His upbringing and education is nothing to be sad for. It made me want to magically make him 30 years younger and transfer him to

I think he wishes like hell that he was! Right now, I bet he's wincing from situations that are tumbling down faster than he can say, "Cut!". If he is lucky, the fairytail spell will hold him up uinti

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I did some "googling" to understand existence of royal family (trying learn, understand) found a source not sure if it is legit.

https://www.royal.uk/role-monarchy

"In a monarchy, a king or queen is Head of State. The British Monarchy is known as a constitutional monarchy. This means that, while The Sovereign is Head of State, the ability to make and pass legislation resides with an elected Parliament.

Although The Sovereign no longer has a political or executive role, he or she continues to play an important part in the life of the nation.

As Head of State, The Monarch undertakes constitutional and representational duties which have developed over one thousand years of history. In addition to these State duties, The Monarch has a less formal role as 'Head of Nation'. The Sovereign acts as a focus for national identity, unity and pride; gives a sense of stability and continuity; officially recognises success and excellence; and supports the ideal of voluntary service."

Too much complicated for me, I'll show myself out.

today-queen-elizabeth-becomes-longest-re

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Yes, that's all correct. We are a constitutional monarchy and that's what it means. Though as PPs have said, they certainly do have influence through their wealth and profile. 

That is also why, while all the criticisms of monarchy are entirely valid, I'm less worried about constitutional monarchy than I am about the PM being able to put his mates and supporters in the House of Lords.

 

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The simple fact that monarchs have private conversations with the PM on a regular basis gives them already more influence than every Joe or Joyce Avarage in the country.

Edited by Sid Nagy
The use of then and than is tricky for Dutch people.
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14 minutes ago, Sid Nagy said:

The use of then and than is tricky for Dutch people.

I imagine it can be. Unfortunately some native english speakers use 'then' when it should be 'than', and actually think it's correct. I've always assumed that it's down to where they live in U.S. If I'm not mistaken, in some parts, the word 'than' is pronounced as though it is spelt 'then', and a few people just don't manage to learn it.

It's similar with New Zealand people, who often pronounce the letter 'e' as an 'i'; e.g. 'bed' sounds like 'bid'. But they don't get the spelling wrong :)

Edited by Phil Deakins
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I think Al Jolson was referring to Harry Linden who, unfortunately, is no longer with LL. He was one of the good ones.

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5 minutes ago, Phil Deakins said:

I imagine it can be. Unfortunately some native english speakers use 'then' when it should be 'than', and actually think it's correct. I've always assumed that it's down to where they live in U.S. If I'm not mistaken, in some parts, the word 'than' is pronounced as though it is spelt 'then', and a few people just don't manage to learn it.

It's similar with New Zealand people, who often pronounce the letter 'e' as an 'i'; e.g. 'bed' sounds like 'bid'. But they don't get the spelling wrong :)

For both then and than we only have one word in Dutch: dan.
That makes it a bit complicated. But I do my best and Google is my friend when in doubt.

Edited by Sid Nagy
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1 hour ago, Sid Nagy said:

For both then and than we only have one word in Dutch: dan.
That makes it a bit complicated. But I do my best and Google is my friend when in doubt.

I'll stew beef.  Sorry hijacked a thread...alstublieft or alsjeblieft.

I think the English have more trouble with Dutch than vice versa.  All the Dutch and Flemish people I know have terrific command of English.  Very few native English speakers can speak ANY other language.

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54 minutes ago, Anna Nova said:

Very few native English speakers can speak ANY other language.

This is sadly true, and I'll hold my hands up to it. I learned a couple of other languages at school, and I did well there, but I was certainly never anywhere near fluent and I've forgotten a lot of them now. I've never had any natural aptitude for languages, though I wish I had. 

But in our limited defence, English is the most widely spoken language in the world so it makes more sense to learn it for most people. Also, if lots of major, international films, songs and TV programmes were in another language (with subtitles on screens), it would make it easier to learn.

I had a conversation once with a Thai lady who was very self conscious and apologetic about her English. It was a darn sight better than my Thai...

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As Amina pointed out, English is the most widely spoken language in the world, but it's not just that. Since the advent, and massive spread, of the web, it's become almost a necessity for way more non-English speaking people to learn English.

We native English speakers are very lucky indeed.

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