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The last thing i want to hear about when i am in SL is this subject. So for me this subject in SL is taboo. Cant stand it when people bring this up in a club where you are to have some fun. Keep that crap going and ill build a security device that instantly bans everyone that says the word and will give it away for free to all club owners in SL.

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Commentary and political opinion are one thing. This is spam. And ignorant, dangerous spam at that. AR'ed.

I don't know if I can do it again. I'm really hoping that my workplace eases up about working from home. I've saved nearly £2000 in travel fares since March last year and I'm now wondering if I even w

I have some suggested rules for the thread, obviously I can't enforce them... so we should all work together...?  But in the spirit of Seicher's original thread: ranting and venting about gove

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30 minutes ago, bobsknief Orsini said:

The last thing i want to hear about when i am in SL is this subject. So for me this subject in SL is taboo. Cant stand it when people bring this up in a club where you are to have some fun. Keep that crap going and ill build a security device that instantly bans everyone that says the word and will give it away for free to all club owners in SL.

You post in a thread dedicated to the last thing you want to hear?

Watching people's first wobbly steps on the internet can be amusing.

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1 hour ago, BastetsDaughter said:

We strangely enough were also considered "medical/front line" for some bizarre reason, and all three of us vets were offered COVID shots but we're all under 40 (I'm just under 30 still, myself) and we wear PPE a lot, so we declined that for the time being, letting the elderly population and those in nursing homes and care facilities get theirs first. Our turn will come soon enough.

Some "front line" occupations may be offered early vaccination because they serve an "essential" role and they make contact with a number of people every day, thus representing a potential transmission vector. So it's not necessarily about the fact you and your colleagues are healthy and under 40, but that you interact with people who may be much more vulnerable.

That said, though, a vet doesn't necessarily "interact" with more people than many other essential occupations. Indeed, our vet goes even further than @LittleMe Jewell's: when arriving for an appointment, the customer calls from outside the office, establishes there's somebody immediately ready to receive, ties the animal to a railing at the entryway and goes back in their car. An assistant takes the patient in and the vet calls back to confer with the customer while examining & treating the animal. Then the whole entry railing exchange happens in reverse, all payment by debit/credit card over the phone.

Even I am comfortable with this arrangement, and I'm one who's extremely cautious about this insidious virus.

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14 hours ago, BastetsDaughter said:

Our clinic has generally stayed open, however the one wing with the grooming business

My vet is the same (two separate businesses, one property owner). The rule here is we can drop off pets outside, pick up pets / meds / pay outside, but we (pet owners) cannot go inside. 

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14 hours ago, bobsknief Orsini said:

The last thing i want to hear about when i am in SL is this subject. So for me this subject in SL is taboo. Cant stand it when people bring this up in a club where you are to have some fun. Keep that crap going and ill build a security device that instantly bans everyone that says the word and will give it away for free to all club owners in SL.

Wait, you don't wear a mask in SL? 

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The more people that are "eligible" for the Covid vaccine, the harder it is for the remaining ones from the first few categories to find an appointment. 

But it sure does make the politicians look good to be able to say "Hey, I did good - ALL of our people are now eligible for the vaccine".

 

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19 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

You post in a thread dedicated to the last thing you want to hear?

Watching people's first wobbly steps on the internet can be amusing.

Patient: "Doctor, it hurts when I do this.."

Doctor: "Then, don't do that!"

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On 4/4/2021 at 3:53 PM, Arielle Popstar said:

 

Less than 1% of America’s population lives in long-term-care facilities, but as of March 4, 2021, this tiny fraction of the country accounts for 34% of US COVID-19 deaths.

 

As someone who used to work in a long term care facility, I feel very confident in pointing out you have no idea how such places work, or how they can work.

There is often a significant number of patients living in close proximity requiring active hands on assistance, a limited number of staff and shared facilities. 

It's impossible to keep a simple norovirus from ripping though these places.

People in long term care are still people.

People in long term care are not prisoners to be kept in solitary (yet that's what happens anyway)

I hope for your sake, none of your relatives / children decide to put you in old people jail care one day. 🤬

  

 

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4 hours ago, Coffee Pancake said:

As someone who used to work in a long term care facility, I feel very confident in pointing out you have no idea how such places work, or how they can work.

There is often a significant number of patients living in close proximity requiring active hands on assistance, a limited number of staff and shared facilities. 

It's impossible to keep a simple norovirus from ripping though these places.

I keep hearing how the viewer you work on is so good and stable and appreciated by the people who use it, so  I'd venture your ability to read code is much better than your ability to read me or my posts. Though it isn't really any of your business or even that germane to the thrust of my post, I have through my life worked in hospitals in various capacities, detention centers, currently live in a retirement community and daily stop in at a local long term care home. I'm familiar with support staff functions and building systems from the boiler room to the cooling towers.

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There is often a significant number of patients living in close proximity requiring active hands on assistance, a limited number of staff and shared facilities. 

It's impossible to keep a simple norovirus from ripping though these places.

 

 It does sound challenging doesn't it and yet the LTC I stop at every morning with 100 plus residents, has not had a single case as yet. There are several others also that haven't but then plenty more that have had major outbreaks with quite a few who died as a result. Why the difference? As someone with some familiarity with institutional building systems, that is something that makes me wonder, perhaps like you wonder why some viewers have better working EEP code then others. One affects the user experience and the other affects human lives. Each is important within their context.

Years ago they used to inject a propylene glycol fog into the hvac systems of hospitals and other sorts of institutions so it would go throughout the building. The chemical was found to be very effective at killing airborne pathogens and thereby drastically reduced transmission of various diseases between staff and residents. A lot of places however stopped using it perhaps because of the cost, extra cleaning and maybe too because of the chemical's slight tendency to be allergenic to a small minority. Maybe something as inconsequential as that could be why some places had major outbreaks and others had none. 

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People in long term care are still people.

People in long term care are not prisoners to be kept in solitary (yet that's what happens anyway)

I hope for your sake, none of your relatives / children decide to put you in old people jail care one day. 🤬

 

I really have no clue where this part is coming from but thanks for the well wishes on not being committed to one. I am paying my karma forward by staying with my Mother so she can stay out of having to go to an LTC as her health becomes increasingly fragile.

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The vaccine rollout in my Provence (and honestly my entire country) has been so painfully poor and its effects weigh on me every day.

It's the fault of both the current and previous governmental planning and a dozen bad decisions. There isn't one easily pointed to bad guy gumming up the system but a core failure of distribution, management, and so much more. 

And it hurts, because people I love are getting sick. Because they can't work from home, and are stuck still facing the public as the daily infections rise quickly. Covid has utterly derailed my life in ways I'm not ready to type to the public. 

It's hard to count my blessings going in or coming out of this, because each one of them comes at a cost. Nana hasn't been exposed to Covid, but at the cost of knowing her Alzheimer's had gotten significantly worse because all we have been able to do for a year is video chat. I worry when I can finally hug her again, she won't remember who I am. 

I don't have a point to this. I'm just so tired. 

 

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On 4/5/2021 at 1:20 PM, BastetsDaughter said:

all the "COVID pets" being adopted from shelters etc into new families, but we didn't have the capacity to manage.

Thanks...another piece to the puzzle of pet care being hard to find these days...everybody in lockdown welcoming new pets into their home..

 

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2 hours ago, Arielle Popstar said:

the LTC I stop at every morning with 100 plus residents, has not had a single case as yet. There are several others also that haven't but then plenty more that have had major outbreaks with quite a few who died as a result. Why the difference? 

Years ago they used to inject a propylene glycol fog into the hvac systems of hospitals and other sorts of institutions so it would go throughout the building.

omg here you are with the super-sekrit causative factors. It's amazing what you come up with to minimize the real causes of the mess we now have in the U.S. with all these unnecessary deaths. Isn't it more logical to believe not EVERY single community would end up with an outbreak because they simply didn't come into contact with Covidiots bringing the virus there?

I'd bet my life the reason some of those communities didn't have an outbreak is because they were fortunate enough not to encounter non-mask wearing, Covid denying, lockdown fearing, and unproven remedy slurping idiots. And now we can add vaccine paranoia as one of the risks for these poor people in homes -- I just hope nobody will be allowed to work in nursing homes without showing their vaccine certificate.

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I just got an email last night from castlight, which is a company that our company uses, saying something about, our tier is available for vaccinations now..

Something along those lines..

It even has a list of locations  in my area.. 

I've asked other people that have gotten their shots and are already done with their second shot.. They said , there isn't any wait.. just make an appointment when you're ready and they'll get you in on that day..

I guess our health department is one of the best in the state from what they are saying.. So that's a good sign..

I'll have to set mine up for weekends so I'm not feeling like crap at work..

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The Great Barrington Declaration

The Great Barrington Declaration – As infectious disease epidemiologists and public health scientists we have grave concerns about the damaging physical and mental health impacts of the prevailing COVID-19 policies, and recommend an approach we call Focused Protection. 

Coming from both the left and right, and around the world, we have devoted our careers to protecting people. Current lockdown policies are producing devastating effects on short and long-term public health. The results (to name a few) include lower childhood vaccination rates, worsening cardiovascular disease outcomes, fewer cancer screenings and deteriorating mental health – leading to greater excess mortality in years to come, with the working class and younger members of society carrying the heaviest burden. Keeping students out of school is a grave injustice. 

Keeping these measures in place until a vaccine is available will cause irreparable damage, with the underprivileged disproportionately harmed.

Fortunately, our understanding of the virus is growing. We know that vulnerability to death from COVID-19 is more than a thousand-fold higher in the old and infirm than the young. Indeed, for children, COVID-19 is less dangerous than many other harms, including influenza. 

As immunity builds in the population, the risk of infection to all – including the vulnerable – falls. We know that all populations will eventually reach herd immunity – i.e.  the point at which the rate of new infections is stable – and that this can be assisted by (but is not dependent upon) a vaccine. Our goal should therefore be to minimize mortality and social harm until we reach herd immunity. 

The most compassionate approach that balances the risks and benefits of reaching herd immunity, is to allow those who are at minimal risk of death to live their lives normally to build up immunity to the virus through natural infection, while better protecting those who are at highest risk. We call this Focused Protection. 

Adopting measures to protect the vulnerable should be the central aim of public health responses to COVID-19. By way of example, nursing homes should use staff with acquired immunity and perform frequent testing of other staff and all visitors. Staff rotation should be minimized. Retired people living at home should have groceries and other essentials delivered to their home. When possible, they should meet family members outside rather than inside. A comprehensive and detailed list of measures, including approaches to multi-generational households, can be implemented, and is well within the scope and capability of public health professionals. 

Those who are not vulnerable should immediately be allowed to resume life as normal. Simple hygiene measures, such as hand washing and staying home when sick should be practiced by everyone to reduce the herd immunity threshold. Schools and universities should be open for in-person teaching. Extracurricular activities, such as sports, should be resumed. Young low-risk adults should work normally, rather than from home. Restaurants and other businesses should open. Arts, music, sport and other cultural activities should resume. People who are more at risk may participate if they wish, while society as a whole enjoys the protection conferred upon the vulnerable by those who have built up herd immunity.

On October 4, 2020, this declaration was authored and signed in Great Barrington, United States, by:

Sign the Declaration

FAQ

https://gbdeclaration.org/

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Nope. Not signing that bs. Not even whoever or whatever the heck Great Barrington is supposed to be is going to tell me how to live what is left of my life. You either wear a mask in my presence, vaccinated or not (since more than one vaccine does exist and that ridiculous declaration is claiming there isn't even one yet), or you do not come anywhere near me. Full stop. No ands, ifs or buts about it. If you don't have any respect for your fellow human beings you don't need to be anywhere around me.

12 minutes ago, Arielle Popstar said:

The Great Barrington Declaration

The Great Barrington Declaration – As infectious disease epidemiologists and public health scientists we have grave concerns about the damaging physical and mental health impacts of the prevailing COVID-19 policies, and recommend an approach we call Focused Protection. 

Coming from both the left and right, and around the world, we have devoted our careers to protecting people. Current lockdown policies are producing devastating effects on short and long-term public health. The results (to name a few) include lower childhood vaccination rates, worsening cardiovascular disease outcomes, fewer cancer screenings and deteriorating mental health – leading to greater excess mortality in years to come, with the working class and younger members of society carrying the heaviest burden. Keeping students out of school is a grave injustice. 

Keeping these measures in place until a vaccine is available will cause irreparable damage, with the underprivileged disproportionately harmed.

Fortunately, our understanding of the virus is growing. We know that vulnerability to death from COVID-19 is more than a thousand-fold higher in the old and infirm than the young. Indeed, for children, COVID-19 is less dangerous than many other harms, including influenza. 

As immunity builds in the population, the risk of infection to all – including the vulnerable – falls. We know that all populations will eventually reach herd immunity – i.e.  the point at which the rate of new infections is stable – and that this can be assisted by (but is not dependent upon) a vaccine. Our goal should therefore be to minimize mortality and social harm until we reach herd immunity. 

The most compassionate approach that balances the risks and benefits of reaching herd immunity, is to allow those who are at minimal risk of death to live their lives normally to build up immunity to the virus through natural infection, while better protecting those who are at highest risk. We call this Focused Protection. 

Adopting measures to protect the vulnerable should be the central aim of public health responses to COVID-19. By way of example, nursing homes should use staff with acquired immunity and perform frequent testing of other staff and all visitors. Staff rotation should be minimized. Retired people living at home should have groceries and other essentials delivered to their home. When possible, they should meet family members outside rather than inside. A comprehensive and detailed list of measures, including approaches to multi-generational households, can be implemented, and is well within the scope and capability of public health professionals. 

Those who are not vulnerable should immediately be allowed to resume life as normal. Simple hygiene measures, such as hand washing and staying home when sick should be practiced by everyone to reduce the herd immunity threshold. Schools and universities should be open for in-person teaching. Extracurricular activities, such as sports, should be resumed. Young low-risk adults should work normally, rather than from home. Restaurants and other businesses should open. Arts, music, sport and other cultural activities should resume. People who are more at risk may participate if they wish, while society as a whole enjoys the protection conferred upon the vulnerable by those who have built up herd immunity.

On October 4, 2020, this declaration was authored and signed in Great Barrington, United States, by:

Sign the Declaration

FAQ

https://gbdeclaration.org/

 

Edited by Selene Gregoire
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The declaration calls for individuals at significantly lower risk of dying from COVID-19 – as well as those at higher risk who so wish – to be allowed to resume their normal lives, working normally at their usual workplaces rather than from home, socialising in bars and restaurants, and gathering at sporting and cultural events. The declaration claims that increased infection of those at lower risk would lead to a build-up of immunity in the population that would eventually also protect those at higher risk from the SARS-CoV-2 virus.[5] The declaration makes no mention of physical distancing, masks, tracing,[6] or long COVID, which has left patients suffering from debilitating symptoms months after the initial infection.[7][8]

The World Health Organization (WHO) and numerous academic and public-health bodies have stated that the proposed strategy is dangerous and lacks a sound scientific basis.[9][10] 

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32 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

Nope. Not signing that bs. Not even whoever or whatever the heck Great Barrington is supposed to be is going to tell me how to live what is left of my life. You either wear a mask in my presence, vaccinated or not (since more than one vaccine does exist and that ridiculous declaration is claiming there isn't even one yet), or you do not come anywhere near me. Full stop. No ands, ifs or buts about it. If you don't have any respect for your fellow human beings you don't need to be anywhere around me.

 

 The document was authored "on October 4, 2020, this declaration was authored and signed in Great Barrington, United States," and is according to the FAQ about the lockdowns causing more harm then good. It is not about vaccines or facemasks.

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Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Director-General of the World Health Organization, warned against the idea of letting the virus spread in order to achieve herd immunity at an October 12 press briefing, calling the notion "unethical". He said: "Herd immunity is a concept used for vaccination, in which a population can be protected from a certain virus if a threshold of vaccination is reached … Herd immunity is achieved by protecting people from a virus, not by exposing them to it."[10][13] Tedros said that trying to achieve herd immunity by letting the virus spread unchecked would be "scientifically and ethically problematic", especially given that the long-term effects of the disease are still not fully understood.[10][13] He said that though "there has been some discussion recently about the concept of reaching so-called 'herd immunity' by letting the virus spread", "never in the history of public health has herd immunity been used as a strategy for responding to an outbreak, let alone a pandemic."

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Lockdowns were supposed to be about slowing the rate of influx to the ICU's to prevent them being overwhelmed. It has gone beyond that and is now from its historical data showing to be of little value in slowing transmission.

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1 hour ago, Rowan Amore said:

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Director-General of the World Health Organization, warned against the idea of letting the virus spread in order to achieve herd immunity at an October 12 press briefing, calling the notion "unethical".

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus living in a utopia world. Where everyone can be locked down and live with photosynthesis. Organization and head of organization become a meme source at the moment and not taken seriously.

But your assumption understandable because USA offering bill during pandemic so you assume every country doing same.

I am not defending herd immunity idea it is not a solution. But they should offer secondary option for the countries who must work and cannot afford to lock down cost or vaccine cost.

I am only worried about elderly people and people who have chronic health problems. I don't see any reason to lock healthy people if they wiling to take risk and carry on with their lives. We only need to separate those people somehow.

Locking down and leaving them to starvation and watching crime rate increase drastically not a viable solution IMO.

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2 minutes ago, RunawayBunny said:

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus living in a utopia world. Where everyone can be locked down and live with photosynthesis. Organization and head of organization become a meme source at the moment and not taken seriously.

But your assumption understandable because USA offering bill during pandemic so you assume every country doing same.

I am not defending herd immunity idea it is not a solution. But they should offer secondary option for the countries who must work and cannot afford to lock down cost or vaccine cost.

I am only worried about elderly people and people who have chronic health problems. I don't see any reason to lock healthy people if they wiling to take risk and carry on with their lives. We only need to separate those people somehow.

Locking down and leaving them to starvation and watching crime rate increase drastically not a viable solution IMO.

No one has been locked down in my state since May of last year.  We have a mask mandate however.  Bars and restaurants and most businesses have been allowed to open with some restrictions.  Funny though, every time they loosen up some restriction, there is a surge in Covid cases.  I doubt that's just a coincidence.  Is your country still in lockdown?  

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1 minute ago, Rowan Amore said:

Is your country still in lockdown?  

Sadly yes and silly part they follow advice of WHO despite people constantly saying they can't afford lock downs anymore.

Mainly restaurants, merchants (small business owners), tourism owners going bankrupt rapidly and they are allowed to give "no salary vacation" to their workers.

I believe we are getting a point of social unrest very rapidly and pandemic going to be last of our worries when it is happens.

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