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normal map baking for second life


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What settings are you using to avoid visible light incidence seams on uv borders?

 

This is how a border seam looks in Secondlife with just normal maps applied an blank diffuse.

 

fa701c35224ea574d8488219e065c49a.png

But the Material normal map in Substance painter looks fine

 

488b83c37b9a77a541ea35d1080e4b84.png

 

So how can be fixed in Secondlife to have correct normal map appearence?

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2 hours ago, Naiman Broome said:

is there a workaround there yet?

Yes. Don't split the UV mapping into separate islands unless you really, really can't avoid it.

Of course, sometimes you can't avoid it and your build may be one of those rare cases. If so, I'm afraid you're out of luck.

But most of the time it's because people rely on Blender's automatic UV map functions. There is this persistent myth that Blender is good at UV mapping. Nothing could be further from the truth.

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On 1/20/2021 at 8:24 PM, ChinRey said:

But most of the time it's because people rely on Blender's automatic UV map functions. There is this persistent myth that Blender is good at UV mapping. Nothing could be further from the truth.

What, the lightmap packer?

In general people need to stop thinking there is a button for everything they don't want to do themselves.

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Without looking at your textures, this is the only thing I can guess to what is happening.

When you bake your UVs, you're not adding in the 'skirt'. Which is basically telling the software to extend the pixels on the edge of the UV seams so they can be blended in.

Additionally, It's also possible that your UVs are just horrid in general. And yes, how you UV your mesh does actually matter. If the UVs are not evenly distributed, you will start seeing issues like these arise as well near the edge due to one plane having significantly lower texel density than the other. It also helps if you work to Hide your UVs seams, to insure that the edges can't be seen if they cannot be fixed.

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4 hours ago, Cyrule Adder said:

Without looking at your textures, this is the only thing I can guess to what is happening.

When you bake your UVs, you're not adding in the 'skirt'. Which is basically telling the software to extend the pixels on the edge of the UV seams so they can be blended in.

Additionally, It's also possible that your UVs are just horrid in general. And yes, how you UV your mesh does actually matter. If the UVs are not evenly distributed, you will start seeing issues like these arise as well near the edge due to one plane having significantly lower texel density than the other. It also helps if you work to Hide your UVs seams, to insure that the edges can't be seen if they cannot be fixed.

If the problem was UV bleeding, we'd see something different or rather a more pronounced/pixelated "edge."

What's happening in the screenshot is SL's rendering engine splitting the lighting calculations because of the UV edge. The shadows should appear smooth, without those sharp clean edges.

Edited by Wulfie Reanimator
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