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Oh my Gawd! - Totally unOfficial Pet Peeve Thread.


Sassy Kenin

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Just now, Rolig Loon said:

I find myself increasingly annoyed by people who start every other sentence with "I mean ..".  The phrase "I mean" is supposed to suggest that they are about to clarify something that they have already said before, but people are not clarifying anything. It's just a new way of saying "um..." or "well ... "  ( What's truly annoying is that I caught myself saying it yesterday. 🙄 )

   I sometimes use 'I mean' as a way to express scepticism or hesitation as to whether I can agree with what someone just said. It is seldom enough that I haven't managed to peeve myself by doing it though .. 

   Someone: "Denmark is such a pretty place!"
   Me: "I mean. It's flat, windy, and damp, but if you're into that, sure?"

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2 minutes ago, Orwar said:

I sometimes use 'I mean' as a way to express scepticism or hesitation as to whether I can agree with what someone just said.

Yes, that makes sense.  Of course, in that case you are at least trying to clarify your own feelings about something that the other person said. "I mean" is still awkward, because it's distracting (and unnecessary except as a transitional filler like my use of "Yes," at the start of this response) .  I am hearing people, including radio interviewers, saying "I mean" even before anyone else has said a word.  That's annoying.  Ummm...  er ... what, what?

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16 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

I find myself increasingly annoyed by people who start every other sentence with "I mean ..".  The phrase "I mean" is supposed to suggest that they are about to clarify something that they have already said before, but people are not clarifying anything. It's just a new way of saying "um..." or "well ... "  ( What's truly annoying is that I caught myself saying it yesterday. 🙄 )

It's a soft opening to a sentence.

"I like turtles"

vs

"I mean, I like turtles"

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10 minutes ago, Coffee Pancake said:

"I mean, I like turtles"

   vs.

   "TURTLES SO QYOOOHT AMAGAWD".

   Shudders, and goes to disinfect his hands from typing such filth.

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2 hours ago, Rolig Loon said:

I find myself increasingly annoyed by people who start every other sentence with "I mean ..".  The phrase "I mean" is supposed to suggest that they are about to clarify something that they have already said before, but people are not clarifying anything. It's just a new way of saying "um..." or "well ... "  ( What's truly annoying is that I caught myself saying it yesterday. 🙄 )

I'm noticing "like I said" being used the same way. It hardly makes sense for that to be the first thing out of someone's mouth.

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3 hours ago, Rolig Loon said:

I find myself increasingly annoyed by people who start every other sentence with "I mean ..".  The phrase "I mean" is supposed to suggest that they are about to clarify something that they have already said before, but people are not clarifying anything. It's just a new way of saying "um..." or "well ... "  ( What's truly annoying is that I caught myself saying it yesterday. 🙄 )

And adding the word 'like' as a placeholder for every pause.

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31 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

I'm noticing "like I said" being used the same way. It hardly makes sense for that to be the first thing out of someone's mouth.

 

6 minutes ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

And adding the word 'like' as a placeholder for every pause.

Yup.  🙄

3 hours ago, Coffee Pancake said:

It's a soft opening to a sentence.

It is, indeed. Every language seems to need such things (alors, ja visst, genau .....).  They announce that the person is about to say something, thus reserving the communication channel during the final second or so before the speaker figures out exactly what she is going to say.  I get that. They are also polite fluff to make the speaker seem less threatening.  I get that too. Still, "I mean" says "Disregard what I said earlier. I've thought of a better way to express myself."  It's misleading.  It makes me think, "Hold on.  Did I miss something just now?"

Anyway, it's a personal peeve, which is why it fits in this lovely thread. It may not annoy anyone else, but it bugs the hell out of me. 🙃

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39 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Every language seems to need such things (alors, ja visst, genau .....).

   I spent half a summer in a Discord server with mostly Austrians and Germans, in an attempt to improve my spoken German. Trust me, 'Genau' doesn't much help to soften things.

   Austrian: "Wir werden dieses Wochenende die Burg der Russen stürmen!
   German: "Genau!"
   Austrian: "Genau, mit Hilfe unserer spanischen Verbündeten schaffen wir es vielleicht, sie aufzulösen und abzuschlachten!"
   German: "Genau, ganz recht!"
   Me: "Hallo! Ich komme aus Schweden! Ich bin keine Kartoffel! Wie geht's?"
   German: "..."
   Austrian: ".. Genau?"
   

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Overhearing customers asking shop assistants this phrase, which makes my skin crawl:

Customer: "Can I get this top/bottom/hat/shoe/cup of coffee/goldfish/slice of moon-cheese please?"

Is the customer asking "Can I get?" as a question to see if it's available in stock?  Or are they actually just wanting to buy it? 

If trying to buy, which it usually is, then the correct phrase would be "I would like...", rather than "Can I get?".

It seems more common with people under the age of 30, are asking this as a question, rather than telling the shop assistant that they actually want to buy a thing.

Grr.

Edited by SarahKB7 Koskinen
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29 minutes ago, SarahKB7 Koskinen said:

Overhearing customers asking shop assistants this phrase, which makes my skin crawl:

Customer: "Can I get this top/bottom/hat/shoe/cup of coffee/goldfish/slice of moon-cheese please?"

Is the customer asking "Can I get?" as a question to see if it's available in stock?  Or are they actually just wanting to buy it? 

If trying to buy, which it usually is, then the correct phrase would be "I would like...", rather than "Can I get?".

It seems more common with people under the age of 30, are asking this as a question, rather than telling the shop assistant that they actually want to buy a thing.

Grr.

Kind of the difference between Can I? And May I?   Had a teacher in grade school that would only answer if you said, " May I go to the restroom?" And never to, "Can I go to the restroom?"

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10 minutes ago, Sammy Huntsman said:

It doesn't kill the germ itself, it kills the proteins coating the germ. Without the proteins the germs are screwed. 

It was meant to be a silly joke… I wasn’t being serious. I also wanted to throw the “I mean” to start the sentence for good measure 

Edited by Krystina Ferraris
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3 minutes ago, Rowan Amore said:

Kind of the difference between Can I? And May I?   Had a teacher in grade school that would only answer if you said, " May I go to the restroom?" And never to, "Can I go to the restroom?"

   I usually just went with "Right then, I'm off to the loo." .. It's not as if they could stop me, nor do I think they would have wanted to. ^_^

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