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Hi guys, after hours of pulling my hairs off not understanding how my new gaming pc was running sl worse than my laptop with integrated gtx 1050 I came across with this silly cause and solution. Might work for you too :)

Turns out my pc was getting throttled because of "Power saver" energy plan on Windows. I set it to ultimate and immediately started to have +100 fps on ultra in not so dense areas, and 50-80 fps on very dense areas (Exhale or Garage).
 

 

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That's bull*****.

That's a question you're going to have to answer on your own. The reiteration was to combat the completely mistaken notion that telling your Operating System how to manage GPU performance/power settin

Hi guys, after hours of pulling my hairs off not understanding how my new gaming pc was running sl worse than my laptop with integrated gtx 1050 I came across with this silly cause and solution. Might

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4 hours ago, GuyJee said:

Hi guys, after hours of pulling my hairs off not understanding how my new gaming pc was running sl worse than my laptop with integrated gtx 1050 I came across with this silly cause and solution. Might work for you too :)

Turns out my pc was getting throttled because of "Power saver" energy plan on Windows. I set it to ultimate and immediately started to have +100 fps on ultra in not so dense areas, and 50-80 fps on very dense areas (Exhale or Garage).
 

 

 

Further be sure you use the GForce graphic card as best as possible, this is done with the NVidea Control Panel:

962504472_NVIDIAControlPanel.thumb.png.0cfebbce12eed74767d1682cf07ab8b7.png

 

Other tips

  • Another good performance tips; in anti-virus programs exclude the cache folder used by the viewer. In Firestorm for example, you find the cache location in Preferences->Network & Files->Directories.
  • Be sure your cache is located on the SSD disk, if you got system with several hard disks.
  • Close all other not needed programs - some programs and web browsers use a lot of VRAM, and if your graphic card has 4 GB or less, the risk of texture trashing higher.
  • If laptop - be sure it is plugged-in to the power outlet socket! Yes, I know.. but often the case, it is not and people forgot.

 

Edited by Rachel1206
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  • 3 weeks later...

I've been given that advice before and used it but there's a problem with this: your computer overclocks, your computer overheats, and the fan breaks or wears down, and getting a fan replacement is very, very hard.

Especially if you got a Best Buy computer off the shelf, asked them to put in a better graphics card that plays SL (because what is on the shelf does not), they tell you that they can only do this if you buy a better fan to cool that better graphics card -- and later because you put the settings you indicate, it all burns down.

If you are not in a position to order the part and replace it yourself, you are SOL as Best Buy will now complain that you have "after market parts" in your computer -- even though this "after market" came right in their store from their own advice and their own product choice and can be seen on your receipt.

There's also your electric bill to consider.

 

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16 hours ago, Lyssa Greymoon said:

If a jalopy computer is prone to self-destruction from changing power settings you shouldn't be trying to run Second Life on it.

A brand-new computer bought at Best Buy with technically the specs listed on page of minimum requirements isn't "a jalopy".

This is like Lindens who sneered that people like me had computers "ready for Kindergarten," i.e. 5 years old.

I've been hearing this snark for 16 years now and I disregard it, because many, many computers have burned out on SL, good and bad, different brands, good cards or bad, fans or not, blah blah.

If the company cannot make software that works on the average Best Buy computer off the rack, they can't grow the user population.

There.com understood this, and understood that women users in particular didn't have the graphic cards needed to play their game. They were expensive, hard to find, etc. So they mailed them out for free. Imagine a company mailing out 20,000 graphic card CDs to users. That's how they were back then at the dawn of the Metaverse. I ordered one, figuring maybe it would work for SL, too.

I asked my then-12-year-old son who said he knew what he was doing to install it, and he used an ungrounded screwdriver and blew out the computer. That's how I lost one of them. Oh, well.

Edited by Prokofy Neva
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I don't have high confidence that Best Buy has always sold only computers configured adequately to handle "Ultimate performance" power settings. Especially modern CPUs have dramatically different rates of heat dissipation in these crazy high "turbo" clock rates (not literally "overclocking" but that distinction is a fine point). Any decent motherboard, however, should be providing plenty of temperature signals to throttle CPU speeds back down -- same with the graphics card -- if cooling isn't adequate.

To be fair, though, I've built my own PCs since 486s, so maybe Best Buy is better than I credit them.

(In passing, the "minimum requirements" page is ludicrously outdated. I don't think a current operating system could run Tetris on the hardware specified there, never mind a 3D graphics video game.)

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there is almost no excuse not to build your own these days. There are sites with compatibility charts galore, and dozens of youtube channels for step by step building (even though the latest trends of see through cases and all the led lights inside is a wee bit ,,, lame lol)

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2 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

A brand-new computer bought at Best Buy with technically the specs listed on page of minimum requirements isn't "a jalopy".

You can't buy a minimum requirements PC at Best Buy unless your other car is a Tardis. It won't run SL and the whole question on enabling ultimate power mode on it is moot because it won't do that either. A minimum spec PC is closer to graduating high school than getting ready for kindergarten. No modern game will run on that. That's a jalopy.

 

2 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

If the company cannot make software that works on the average Best Buy computer off the rack, they can't grow the user population.

Second Life will work on every PC and Mac Best Buy sells today. It may suck on most of the ones that cost less than about $500 (which, excluding Macs seems to be about the average price of the in stock computers at my local Best Buy), but it will run and the computer will not burn itself out. Modern computers have thermal protection that will throttle the CPU and GPU before that happens. Running the fans at 6,000 RPM may shorten their life, but if the computer is doing that it probably wasn't designed for gaming in the first place and most modern games will stress the hardware just like SL. Being fit for purpose is a thing.

4 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

There.com understood this, and understood that women users in particular didn't have the graphic cards needed to play their game. They were expensive, hard to find, etc. So they mailed them out for free. Imagine a company mailing out 20,000 graphic card CDs to users.

If only Linden Lab knew what they were doing as well as a company who thought mailing out 20,000 graphics cards to people who don't know how to use a screwdriver was a good idea they might go somewhere in the virtual world business.

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On 11/20/2020 at 8:22 PM, Prokofy Neva said:

I've been given that advice before and used it but there's a problem with this: your computer overclocks, your computer overheats, and the fan breaks or wears down, and getting a fan replacement is very, very hard.

Especially if you got a Best Buy computer off the shelf, asked them to put in a better graphics card that plays SL (because what is on the shelf does not), they tell you that they can only do this if you buy a better fan to cool that better graphics card -- and later because you put the settings you indicate, it all burns down.

If you are not in a position to order the part and replace it yourself, you are SOL as Best Buy will now complain that you have "after market parts" in your computer -- even though this "after market" came right in their store from their own advice and their own product choice and can be seen on your receipt.

There's also your electric bill to consider.

7 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

A brand-new computer bought at Best Buy with technically the specs listed on page of minimum requirements isn't "a jalopy".

This is like Lindens who sneered that people like me had computers "ready for Kindergarten," i.e. 5 years old.

I've been hearing this snark for 16 years now and I disregard it, because many, many computers have burned out on SL, good and bad, different brands, good cards or bad, fans or not, blah blah.

If the company cannot make software that works on the average Best Buy computer off the rack, they can't grow the user population.

There.com understood this, and understood that women users in particular didn't have the graphic cards needed to play their game. They were expensive, hard to find, etc. So they mailed them out for free. Imagine a company mailing out 20,000 graphic card CDs to users. That's how they were back then at the dawn of the Metaverse. I ordered one, figuring maybe it would work for SL, too.

I asked my then-12-year-old son who said he knew what he was doing to install it, and he used an ungrounded screwdriver and blew out the computer. That's how I lost one of them. Oh, well.

😧

  1. Getting replacement fans is not hard, especially if you're buying pre-built computers "off the shelf."
  2. Changing your power settings is not overclocking.
    • Power settings only set limits to your CPU speed (never increasing it above standard) and allows things to go to sleep to save your power bill. The "max performance" mode simply allows the CPU to work at its standard speed and prevents automatic sleep mode.
  3. Changing your power settings will not burn down your computer unless the environment the computer is in is extremely bad;
    • Hot room, poor airflow, no airflow, inadequate airflow (hardware warms up faster than the fan can cool things down), etc.
  4. If your computer matches the minimum requirements for Second Life, it is a jalopy. (I learned a new word today.)
    • The CPUs and GPUs they recommend there are from early 2000s. These computers should be sneered at, because they're very outdated in terms of performance. You absolutely cannot expect computers like that to run Second Life well. You should only expect them to run it and even that's charitable.
  5. A company mailing out 20'000 graphics card CDs is not the same as mailing out graphics cards.
    • A driver update CD, assuming it's even for your brand of graphics card, can only do so much. It's like getting an update on your old phone, the code might be a little more optimized but it's no replacement to finally buying a newer phone.

Anything besides actual hardware malfunctions (possibly aided by the environment) couldn't possibly cause a standard computer to "burn out" in regular use. I absolutely reject that. Modern computers aren't that frail. There are several safeguards to prevent things like that from happening, from thermal throttling to automatic shutdown when things get a little too toasty.

Just to be clear: I am sure you've heard of people's computers break down. I am sure those cases are real, too. But correlation does not mean that Second Life was the issue. If you change an OS-level setting and your computer breaks down while using Second Life, your computer would've had the same fate with other games or software (like rendering images on Blender the equivalent amount of time).

Your average Best Buy employee isn't gonna have any idea what Second Life even is either, so you can't tell them that's what your intention is and expect them to know what you need. They'll probably ask or assume it's some kind of game, ask for your budget, and offer you a computer with whatever random graphics card happens to be in there. I did check Best Buy's website by the way, and I couldn't find a computer that doesn't fit Second Life's minimum requirements. Even the cheapest computer in the desktop computer section should be able to run Second Life, and it doesn't even have a graphics card.

You aren't wrong about LL writing awful code though, they've admitted as much. The rendering process might as well be in the early 2000s alongside the minimum requirements.

Edited by Wulfie Reanimator
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Modern gaming PC and laptops handle SL flawless - entry gaming level models are like around 750 US$ for laptops, a little less for a PC.

My gaming laptop shows temperature of 60-68c on CPU and 57c on the GPU and this while we have our Saturday party in Second Life running for two hours with ppl coming and going.

According to the documentation on the laptop, it handles flawless CPU up to 90/100c and GPU 115c, values I never seen or approached in any games - over 82c continuous it starts to throttle down to protect it self. Well before that the fans kicks in spinning faster and cooling it down, so no need to throttle performance down normally.

 

 

Edited by Rachel1206
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1 hour ago, Solar Legion said:

Y'all do realize you're responding to a brick wall, right?

Yep. It's more for people who read this thread and come away thinking they can overclock their PC through power management, and that doing so will burn down their computer. It also gives me another chance to take a shot at the crazy minimum system requirements because they're stupid and wrong. Don't take that list into Best Buy and ask for a computer. They'll all laugh at you.

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On 11/20/2020 at 5:03 PM, Lyssa Greymoon said:

If a jalopy computer is prone to self-destruction from changing power settings you shouldn't be trying to run Second Life on it.

Yes, I realize you think it's normal to overload/overclock your computer and use up more electricity, wearing out the fan required to cool the graphics card, among other things, just to view and interact with a virtual world.

You imagine this is normal; therefore you imagine it's normal to club people over the head who point out that it is not normal. The reason SL doesn't have a lot of uptake is because it requires more expensive, high end computers and settings like this; it's a boutique. That's fine, but the makers imagine they are appeal to mass audiences and can grow their user base.

Each time these facts are invoked, the forums fanboyz rant about how your computer is the problem, or you lack of knowledge, or your failure not to exploit the hell out of the set-up to run SL and wear it out. In any other setting the absurdity of this would be obvious. But because more expensive computers which fancier graphic cards requiring heavier fans are synonymous with "cool" for many geeks, this is what we get.

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On 11/21/2020 at 5:31 PM, Lyssa Greymoon said:

Yep. It's more for people who read this thread and come away thinking they can overclock their PC through power management, and that doing so will burn down their computer. It also gives me another chance to take a shot at the crazy minimum system requirements because they're stupid and wrong. Don't take that list into Best Buy and ask for a computer. They'll all laugh at you.

Changing your settings to increase power usage and not save power does indeed wear out your computer faster. 

Here's what PC World says -- and note that they are very cautious in making this same point so that fanboyz like you won't club *them* over the head, either. But basically, they explain it. And there are those of you on this thread who imagine that because you don't boost it up *much* because you're so sophisticated and cool and "know what's safe," or because you already have a better-quality fan that already cools the overheated graphics card, that therefore the statement that "boosting power wears out your computer" is false, or meaningless, or doesn't apply. Another feature of this overconfidence is the belief that "overclocking" has such a special, insiders-only meaning that only true geeks can know, that making it co-terminous with "increasing power" is proof of ignorance and idiocy, even though any specialist's site or general public site will explain it to you.

You're not focusing on what it means to buy a computer for $1000 or whatever you can get it for, and then spend hundreds more on a fan and a graphics card that are now "after market items" (even if bought in the same Best Buy and not from some guy in Little Korea) causing your warranty to be useful and your computer not eligible to be repaired when it burns out. You imagine that "stupidity," and "lack of knowledge about computers" and all the PICNIC idiocy that geeks bring to bear on a topic like this is at issue. But actually, pushing the computer beyond the manufacturer's recommendation is the problem.

And taking "minimum requirements" seriously because they are published by the game manufacturer -- instead of guffawing and acting like this is an inside joke that insiders can enjoy while chumps get burned -- is something we should all be able to do if this company values its reputation (but it doesn't).

When you overclock a hardware component--usually the processor--you trick it into working faster than the manufacturer's recommended maximum speed. Every processor is packaged and priced to run at a particular clock speed--for instance, 3100 MHz.  But that speed is an estimate, and usually a conservative one. You can usually bump it up a bit without causing problems. Sometimes, you can bump it up quite a bit.

 

But there are some equally good reasons not to. For one, it might damage your hardware, although bringing up the speed a notch or two is probably safe.

Keeping your PC cool will help protect it from damage caused by overclocking. So make sure your PC is well-ventilated before increasing its speed. I don't recommend overclocking laptops, which tend to be less ventilated than desktops.

Edited by Prokofy Neva
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On 11/21/2020 at 4:54 PM, Rachel1206 said:

Modern gaming PC and laptops handle SL flawless - entry gaming level models are like around 750 US$ for laptops, a little less for a PC.

My gaming laptop shows temperature of 60-68c on CPU and 57c on the GPU and this while we have our Saturday party in Second Life running for two hours with ppl coming and going.

According to the documentation on the laptop, it handles flawless CPU up to 90/100c and GPU 115c, values I never seen or approached in any games - over 82c continuous it starts to throttle down to protect it self. Well before that the fans kicks in spinning faster and cooling it down, so no need to throttle performance down normally.

 

 

 

6a0120a85dcdae970b0128776ff992970c-pi.png

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On 11/21/2020 at 3:14 PM, Wulfie Reanimator said:

😧

  1. Getting replacement fans is not hard, especially if you're buying pre-built computers "off the shelf."
  2. Changing your power settings is not overclocking.
    • Power settings only set limits to your CPU speed (never increasing it above standard) and allows things to go to sleep to save your power bill. The "max performance" mode simply allows the CPU to work at its standard speed and prevents automatic sleep mode.
  3. Changing your power settings will not burn down your computer unless the environment the computer is in is extremely bad;
    • Hot room, poor airflow, no airflow, inadequate airflow (hardware warms up faster than the fan can cool things down), etc.
  4. If your computer matches the minimum requirements for Second Life, it is a jalopy. (I learned a new word today.)
    • The CPUs and GPUs they recommend there are from early 2000s. These computers should be sneered at, because they're very outdated in terms of performance. You absolutely cannot expect computers like that to run Second Life well. You should only expect them to run it and even that's charitable.
  5. A company mailing out 20'000 graphics card CDs is not the same as mailing out graphics cards.
    • A driver update CD, assuming it's even for your brand of graphics card, can only do so much. It's like getting an update on your old phone, the code might be a little more optimized but it's no replacement to finally buying a newer phone.

Anything besides actual hardware malfunctions (possibly aided by the environment) couldn't possibly cause a standard computer to "burn out" in regular use. I absolutely reject that. Modern computers aren't that frail. There are several safeguards to prevent things like that from happening, from thermal throttling to automatic shutdown when things get a little too toasty.

Just to be clear: I am sure you've heard of people's computers break down. I am sure those cases are real, too. But correlation does not mean that Second Life was the issue. If you change an OS-level setting and your computer breaks down while using Second Life, your computer would've had the same fate with other games or software (like rendering images on Blender the equivalent amount of time).

Your average Best Buy employee isn't gonna have any idea what Second Life even is either, so you can't tell them that's what your intention is and expect them to know what you need. They'll probably ask or assume it's some kind of game, ask for your budget, and offer you a computer with whatever random graphics card happens to be in there. I did check Best Buy's website by the way, and I couldn't find a computer that doesn't fit Second Life's minimum requirements. Even the cheapest computer in the desktop computer section should be able to run Second Life, and it doesn't even have a graphics card.

You aren't wrong about LL writing awful code though, they've admitted as much. The rendering process might as well be in the early 2000s alongside the minimum requirements.

The level of your arrogance and inability to accept facts from the field is exceeded only by the number of weeks you let your rent go unpaid before paying it after many notices.

1. Yeah, I know, because I did it in two minutes at Best Buy. But the point is, if you have a warranty, and they put in different fan than what it originally came with, when it burns out, they refuse to replace it and make you buy and install a new one. And first you have to determine if maybe more is damaged, the motherboard perhaps, because the whole reason you buy a computer from Best Buy and use their deplorable "Geek Squad" is because, like people who don't perform surgery themselves and go to doctors, you aren't a specialist and shouldn't have to be.

2. Yeah, I know. But I think you're not accepting or admitting that like all settings there are regular and advanced. So yeah, you can just have power that affects when the computer sleeps:

https://gyazo.com/3a9d1020ce8dffd3129e038e195cb0c2

Or you can have power options that in fact say something different:

f2514a470a4f3946110624cf9ff5402b.png
https://gyazo.com/f2514a470a4f3946110624cf9ff5402b

Note that it says balanced, which "balances performance with energy consumption on CAPABLE hardware (emphasis added) or one that REDUCES PERFORMANCE.

So the power buttons are really about whether to push your computer harder and make it do more -- or not.

2B. Yeah, I know. You think it's oh-so-brainy to let us know that "overclock" technically refers to changes to the motherboard and not to the power switch. But so what? It doesn't matter. The USAGE of this term is DIFFERENT than what you imagine as many, many more people now have computers besides you, a programmer or specialist. And especially when you look at "2B" here, you realize why. I realize this is very hard to grasp or accept. But that's the case. I hear it all the time even from people who know considerably more about computers than me. You're simply not correct that all it does is let your computer go to sleep. It enables your computer to work at higher speeds. Different. Whether you "touched" the motherboard or clicked on a switch, your computer works harder to play SL; the fan burns out. Even when it is ventilated. Even when you bought a better one. The end. That this is disputed is one of the marvels of science.

So you're not correct because you're busy showing off and not listening to another data set from the field. Like you and other geeks are *not correct* when you keep airily saying that IP addresses are dynamic or they update or lots of people use the same when -- when in fact in many cases they remain static, and come out of a list that in fact enables you to identify location and person.

3. When  tower is on a desk stand-alone, not blocked by anything, with plenty of airflow, in a room with air conditioning and an air filter, you can no longer blame the environment. You have to look at other things to blame *gasp*.

4. Usually when I buy a computer, it is *better than* the requirements on the list because buying exactly to those requirements proves difficult because they aren't even in the store. They are outdated. Anyone in SL for 16 years understands that. But sales people, being in the same duplicitous business as geeks, often tell you that a computer will play something when it can't really. And if YOUR FELLOW GEEKS and not "JUST ANYBODY" puts a list of requirements on a web site, users take it at face value, and SHOULD NOT BE BLAMED WHEN THEY DO.

5. There.com did not merely mail out a CD to update a driver. They mailed out a graphics card.  Because it would be eminently stupid to mail out some CD that merely updated a driver when what is needed is an entirely different graphics card. There were news articles and New World Notes posts about this generous program at the time from a company whose CEO believed his typical demographic was a 30-year-old very overweight woman in a small town. He's gone now, and so is There, but you're still here.

Generally, I keep the forums and inworld relations separate, and I continue to do business with people who behave terribly on the forums, swaggering around and crushing people with their specialized knowledge or just generally behaving like gits. I continue to buy from them if they make good things or I rent to them.

But every once in awhile -- maybe once in ten years -- I decide to make an exception, especially with people who never pay their rent online in a crappy little $100/wk rental when likely they make six figures as a computer programmer - or at least something roughly comparable. So find a new landlord to torture.

Edited by Prokofy Neva
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Oh for - would you quit trying to pretend you know better, for once? You don't - deal with it.

Until you actually listen, you're nothing more than a Mark for Best Buy's sales staff to exploit for a nice little bonus.

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3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

The level of your arrogance and inability to accept facts from the field is exceeded only by the number of weeks you let your rent go unpaid before paying it after many notices.

But I do pay it. :)

If you're aware of any unpaid weeks, total them up and let me know. I don't intentionally skip out. I'll pay a full month's rent for each missed week, then I'll move out.

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

When you overclock a hardware component--usually the processor--you trick it into working faster than the manufacturer's recommended maximum speed. Every processor is packaged and priced to run at a particular clock speed--for instance, 3100 MHz.  But that speed is an estimate, and usually a conservative one. You can usually bump it up a bit without causing problems. Sometimes, you can bump it up quite a bit.

But there are some equally good reasons not to. For one, it might damage your hardware, although bringing up the speed a notch or two is probably safe.

Keeping your PC cool will help protect it from damage caused by overclocking. So make sure your PC is well-ventilated before increasing its speed. I don't recommend overclocking laptops, which tend to be less ventilated than desktops.

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

2B. Yeah, I know. But the USAGE of this term is DIFFERENT than what you imagine as many, many more people now have computers besides you, a programmer or specialist. And especially when you look at "2B" here, you realize why. I realize this is very hard to grasp or accept. But that's the case. I hear it all the time even from people who know considerably more about computers than me. You're simply not correct that all it does is let your computer go to sleep. It enables your computer to work at higher speeds. Different.

Overclocking is dangerous and can definitely harm your hardware, of course. Nobody in this thread has denied that, even I'm too scared to overclock. What is being denied is that the power settings in Windows is not the same thing as overclocking. It does not cause your processor to speed up beyond the manufacturer's limit. I don't know how to explain this to you any clearer than that. The source you're citing to disagree with me does not disagree with me, because it's talking about a different thing than you.

Processors don't work at the same speed all the time. When your computer is doing nothing, the processor will slow down. When you're doing something more intense like watching a livestream, installing programs, or playing Second Life, your processor's clock-speed will increase on its own. This is not what we call overclocking because it's a natural occurrence in computers. Overclocking means specifically to increase the processor's clock-speed over the manufacturer's standard, as explained by your article.

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

2. Yeah, I know. But I think you're not accepting or admitting that like all settings there are regular and advanced. So yeah, you can just have power that affects when the computer sleeps:

I don't think I have to "admit" something that I think is inherently true. I haven't tried to imply anything on the contrary. Of course there are advanced settings that most people won't touch or even look at. Let's do that now. Here are the advanced settings, which is everything a power plan will change:

d7c9229e0c.png

If we expand the "Processor power management" part: (Which I think is most relevant, the others are mainly just on/off switches or timers to turn things off.)

00a09beb60.png

I think this is fairly self-explanatory. You can quickly compare the different modes by selecting them from the above dropdown. "High Performance" differs by increasing the minimum processor state.

To circle back to what was originally suggested at the start of this thread, "Power Saver" will use "Passive" cooling policy, which means the processor will slow down first, and then the fans start if needed. ("Active" cooling means the fans will always be cooling down the computer.) I think this is bad for many reasons, but saving power is not one of them.

If your power plan is already set to Balanced (like yours is), you might not even notice a difference from increasing it if your processor is already increasing itself to maximum speed. In cases where the processor is strong enough to idle even when programs are being used, increasing the minimum state should help. Otherwise it's a waste of power like you've said.

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

CEO believed his typical demographic was a 30-year-old very overweight woman in a small town. He's gone now, and so is There, but you're still here.

Stop projecting, this is beyond childish. (I didn't see it coming though, points for that.)

Edited by Wulfie Reanimator
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3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

Yes, I realize you think it's normal to overload/overclock your computer

Uh huh. I'll get to this right after this:

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

The reason SL doesn't have a lot of uptake is because it requires more expensive, high end computers and settings like this; it's a boutique.

See those words under my forum avatar? The computers I run SL on are decidedly not expensive, high end or boutique. Unless your definition of any of those extends to Optiplex bought from thrift store for $20. I don't overclock them and don't recall ever advising anyone else to overclock their computer for SL. I've overclocked some graphics cards, but for very short term evaluation and not for daily use.

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

Changing your settings to increase power usage and not save power does indeed wear out your computer faster. 

Power management settings doesn't overclock your computer. Overclocking is a non-issue for most users because most computers are built with processors that can't even be overclocked. The power usage will still be within manufacturer's specifications. Plug your PC into a Kill-a-watt and I think you'll find your PC consumes the same amount of power when running SL regardless of what the power management setting is.

3 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

And taking "minimum requirements" seriously because they are published by the game manufacturer -- instead of guffawing and acting like this is an inside joke that insiders can enjoy while chumps get burned...

No one here treats them as an inside joke. Every time they come up in discussions they are taken seriously and people are warned that they are over a decade out of date precisely so that "chumps" don't get burned. You can rail against imagined arrogant elitism or you can consider maybe someone who isn't you knows what they're talking about.

Edited by Lyssa Greymoon
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I'm going to reiterate something I posted upthread, just so that anyone reading this fully understands and I am going to do so in the most attention catching way possible:

Overclocking your hardware is done at the BIOS level - that is before your Operating System even begins to start.

There now, hopefully those capable of listening, actually will.

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2 minutes ago, Solar Legion said:

I'm going to reiterate something I posted upthread, just so that anyone reading this fully understands and I am going to do so in the most attention catching way possible:

Overclocking your hardware is done at the BIOS level - that is before your Operating System even begins to start.

There now, hopefully those capable of listening, actually will.

..but why would we want to?

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2 hours ago, Wulfie Reanimator said:
2 hours ago, Prokofy Neva said:

Yeah, I know. But I think you're not accepting or admitting that like all settings there are regular and advanced. So yeah, you can just have power that affects when the computer sleeps:

I don't think I have to "admit" something that I think is inherently true.

If you disagree with some people, then you by definition are "not accepting or admitting" to their reality.  lulz!

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12 minutes ago, Love Zhaoying said:

..but why would we want to?

That's a question you're going to have to answer on your own. The reiteration was to combat the completely mistaken notion that telling your Operating System how to manage GPU performance/power settings when a specific program is launched is not in any way whatsoever Overclocking it.

ETA: The reason why you'll have to answer it on your own is simple enough: Each person's reasons for Overclocking will be different - similar but still their own.

As a personal example: A few months after being gifted the PC I currently have, I went into my BIOS and changed the Clock Speed of my RAM from the stock speed (2133Mhz) to a bit under what the RAM itself was rated to be 'stable' at (3600Mhz rating, 3200Mhz being what I set it at).

Fast forward to the start of this month and after an initially bungled purchase for a RAM expansion (mismatched CLI rating) and I had to reset the RAM clock speed to factory for it to be stable.

Why did I increase the RAM clock speed initially? I only had 16 GB of RAM and I tend to leave certain things running in the background. The higher RAM clock allowed processes to be done a bit quicker without needing to touch the clock settings for the CPU.

Edited by Solar Legion
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