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1 hour ago, Odaks said:

"I can see Deirdre now that the train has gone..."

(Jonny Nash et al)

I have a feeling it was the Creedence Clearwater Revival version that gave rise to this misinterpretation (monagreen?)

 

Mondegreen
American writer Sylvia Wright coined the term in 1954, writing that as a girl, when her mother read to her from Percy's Reliques, she had misheard the lyric "layd him on the green" in the fourth line of the Scottish ballad "The Bonny Earl of Murray" as "Lady Mondegreen".

   Ye Highlands and ye Lawlands,
   Oh where have you been?
   They have slain the Earl o' Moray
   And layd him on the green.

(from Wikipedia)

Edited by Fritigern Gothly
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"just let me staple the vicar" from "we are family"  

It was quite a head spinner to realise I hadn't ever misheard any of the lyrics to I Am The Walrus.

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1 hour ago, Aethelwine said:

"just let me staple the vicar" from "we are family"

 

Aeth, notice that Peter primes the audience by reciting the misheard lyric before he plays the tune. He also sometimes mouths his misheard version while the song plays, to elicit the McGurk Effect.

 

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1 hour ago, RowanMinx said:

Still have no idea what it means.  I guess I should probably look that up sometime.

aww, what a blast from the past! I loved this as a kid :D

I just looked up the meaning, and it means what I thought it meant, but the derivation of the patois isn't what i expected ;)

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1 hour ago, Amina Sopwith said:

My understanding is that it's either a drug reference, or a dutchie is also a sort of pot used for cooking, so it's about sharing either food or substances. 

( and for @RowanMinx)

Pass The Dutchie was an adaptation of a song called Pass The Kouchie recorded by reggae group The Mighty Diamonds. "Kouchie" was Jamaican slang for a "pot in which marijuana is kept" and "Dutchie" was a "Dutch stewing pot" in the same "patois"

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9 minutes ago, LexxiXhan said:

( and for @RowanMinx)

Pass The Dutchie was an adaptation of a song called Pass The Kouchie recorded by reggae group The Mighty Diamonds. "Kouchie" was Jamaican slang for a "pot in which marijuana is kept" and "Dutchie" was a "Dutch stewing pot" in the same "patois"

Its history goes back even further, Pass the Kouchie (1982) was a cover too!
The original was an 1969 instrumental song by Sound Dimension, called Full Up.

 

Edited by Fritigern Gothly
Typo'ed "Kouchie" as "Koochie". Oops!
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My mum used to play this when I was little and for years I thought the bit at 02:23 said 

And as I was drifting past the Northern Line 

(train line in London)

but it's actually drifting past the lorelei...I prefer my misheard version 😉

 

Edited by Rat Luv
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Miss me a lot!!

We will not let you go! (Let him go!)

miss me a lot!!

We will not let you go! (Let him go!)

Let me go!

Will not let you go!

Let me go!

Will not let you go!

Let me goooooooo!

no no no no no!

Mama Mia, Mama Mia!

Beelzebub has a devil for a son for me! For me! For meeeeeee!

 

Edited by Janet Voxel
Forgot a part
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3 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

I'd never really thought about it. Richard Berry is quite clear. The Kingsmen, can't understand a word. "Louie Louie, oh, reggaeton...?" Was he drunk? 

The real lyrics look pretty tame. Google suggests it's people hearing other things in the incomprehensible Kingsmen version...?

For the times, the original lyrics (before The Kingsmen recorded it) were pretty racy. You just didn't use the f bomb if you wanted the song to sell. Today's "standards" don't really apply.

If you don't know any of the lyrics, what do you hear when you listen to the song? Do you hear a song about a Jamaican or just gibberish? Or do you hear something completely different, like I did? 🤭

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3 hours ago, Odaks said:

"I can see Deirdre now that the train has gone..."

(Jonny Nash et al)

I have a feeling it was the Creedence Clearwater Revival version that gave rise to this misinterpretation (monagreen?)

 

I've always heard it as, "I can see clearly now the rain is gone, I can see all obstacles in my way. I can see clearly now the rain is gone. It's gonna be a bright, bright, sun shiny day." I love CCR.

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3 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

My understanding is that it's either a drug reference, or a dutchie is also a sort of pot used for cooking, so it's about sharing either food or substances. 

That would be a dutch oven which is a pot and not an oven. Hey. What can I say. It's a Southern thing.

I have a cast iron one with legs and now I can't use it. Hey thanks! That's what I'll ask for for Christmas! A non cast iron dutch oven.

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Lyrics
Get on up when you're down
Baby, take a better look around
I know it's not much, but it's okay
We'll keep on moving anyway

 

What I Heard
Gay or not when you're down
Baby, take a better look around
I know it's not much, but it's okay
We'll keep on moving anyway

Edited by Jordan Whitt
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I used to think this song said this,

"Now thank god for the media, for saving the day
Putting it all into perspective in a irresponsible way"

When it is Responsible way.. But that was from seeing lyrics on youtube saying that, so it stuck in my head that way.

The song is a total shot at the media and social media, So Responsible is used as sarcastic in the song..which made much more sense when I finally found out what they really said..

 

 

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8 hours ago, Silent Mistwalker said:

For the times, the original lyrics (before The Kingsmen recorded it) were pretty racy. You just didn't use the f bomb if you wanted the song to sell. Today's "standards" don't really apply.

If you don't know any of the lyrics, what do you hear when you listen to the song? Do you hear a song about a Jamaican or just gibberish? Or do you hear something completely different, like I did? 🤭

The lyrics I found when I looked them up weren't obscene at all, just about sailing a ship and missing a girl. But I found an article saying that the Kingsmen had recorded it with bad technique (instruments loud, singer not close enough to the mic), resulting in the absolute gibberish I heard in that one, and since then many people had heard much dirtier words in it. But surely the Kingsmen would have performed it live sometimes, they couldn't keep that up? I didn't spend too long on it, tbf.

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13 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

Aeth, notice that Peter primes the audience by reciting the misheard lyric before he plays the tune. He also sometimes mouths his misheard version while the song plays, to elicit the McGurk Effect.

 

Is that related to this phenomenon?

 When I close my eyes and try to block my mind so I'm not thinking of either word, I get "brainstorm".

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9 hours ago, Jordan Whitt said:

Lyrics
Get on up when you're down
Baby, take a better look around
I know it's not much, but it's okay
We'll keep on moving anyway

 

What I Heard
Gay or not when you're down
Baby, take a better look around
I know it's not much, but it's okay
We'll keep on moving anyway

Oh, that's a band I haven't seen for a long time. I liked them!

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20 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

"young girl with eyes like pesetas",

It is, of course, "Young girls with eyes like potatoes."

But this is my favorite: a song called "I love your period."

 

19 hours ago, RowanMinx said:

Still have no idea what it ["Pass the Dutchie"] means.

Of course you don't ^_^

pass-teh-dutchie.thumb.jpg.58087891d618520a99aae27c825268b3.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Arduenn Schwartzman said:

It is, of course, "Young girls with eyes like potatoes."

But this is my favorite: a song called "I love your period."

 

Of course you don't ^_^

pass-teh-dutchie.thumb.jpg.58087891d618520a99aae27c825268b3.jpg

A "Dutchie" is a Jamaican cooking pot, and while there's not much reason to pass one around, it was an acceptable substitute for the original lyric: "Pass The Kutchie," Kutchie being Jamaican slang for a pot that holds marijuana. "Pass The Kutchie" was a song that came out earlier in 1982 by the reggae group The Mighty Diamonds, which was adapted by Musical Youth, or at least their handlers - the five boys in the group were between the ages of 11 and 16 years old at the time, and their manager suggested they record the song with the modified lyric.

Guess that makes sense.

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5 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Is that related to this phenomenon?

 When I close my eyes and try to block my mind so I'm not thinking of either word, I get "brainstorm".

It is related. The general idea is that our auditory perception is conditioned by our visual perception.

Here's another example...

 

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