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Skin Pores Highlight Effect In Photoshop?


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Hiya! Soo I have seen many people (bloggers, photo editors etc) use a technique to give the skin some realism in photoshop. I am talking about specifically the skin effect that is white and it defines the “pores”. They usually put it on the cheeks, nose bridge, nose tip etc. It really gives it a sorta “sweaty or wet look” but I think it really adds realism too the idea of how human skin behaves. I have tried many brushes and using different ways,( overlay, screen, color dodge, linear dodge) Anybody who uses this in  photos can offer me some advice on brushes and technique? I have reached out to several people who use it on Flickr but none of them have ever responded or they do and politely say it’s a secret. Any ideas or help is very much appreciated. I will not link a direct Flickr example due to not having permission but I did capture the effect on a portrait and screenshot it for reference of what I am referring too. ( I can tell the RGB is split on this example, i don’t think that really matters though?) Thankies! 

Reference: https://prnt.sc/ukfffc

Edited by taurusthetiger
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8 hours ago, taurusthetiger said:

Hiya! Soo I have seen many people (bloggers, photo editors etc) use a technique to give the skin some realism in photoshop. I am talking about specifically the skin effect that is white and it defines the “pores”. They usually put it on the cheeks, nose bridge, nose tip etc. It really gives it a sorta “sweaty or wet look” but I think it really adds realism too the idea of how human skin behaves. I have tried many brushes and using different ways,( overlay, screen, color dodge, linear dodge) Anybody who uses this in  photos can offer me some advice on brushes and technique? I have reached out to several people who use it on Flickr but none of them have ever responded or they do and politely say it’s a secret. Any ideas or help is very much appreciated. I will not link a direct Flickr example due to not having permission but I did capture the effect on a portrait and screenshot it for reference of what I am referring too. ( I can tell the RGB is split on this example, i don’t think that really matters though?) Thankies! 

Reference: https://prnt.sc/ukfffc

That looks more like a layer such as highlight that is applied to your avatar.

Kind of like this 

 

_MJN_GlowhighlighterMP.jpg

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2 hours ago, Lillith Hapmouche said:

Plot twist: it's just poor JPEG compression artifacts from ripped textures ;)
Nah, kidding... partly.

But yeah, extra layers or the head's material effects probably come into play here.

Or did you try plain, old sharpening tools?

In other words: for my liking, the reference pic doesn't look good at all.

 

Well that is what people tell me who have offered help, they said its the materials on the head, but when i look at the before/afters of the pictures the artists doo its not, because the before pic does not have that at all.. here is a  more clearer image maybe of reference above, i can tell that was clearly done in Photoshop, just not really sure how it was achieved too look that realistic/natural.  

Here is a bigger reference picture, showing more of the face. https://prnt.sc/ukoe1j

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6 minutes ago, taurusthetiger said:

Well that is what people tell me who have offered help, they said its the materials on the head, but when i look at the before/afters of the pictures the artists doo its not, because the before pic does not have that at all.. here is a  more clearer image maybe of reference above, i can tell that was clearly done in Photoshop, just not really sure how it was achieved too look that realistic/natural.  

Here is a bigger reference picture, showing more of the face. https://prnt.sc/ukoe1j

I don't see that as looking natural at all unless she's been running a marathon or just got out of the shower.  Personally, I don't care for overly shiny faces or bodies unless there's a reason for it.  It still looks like a layer of some kind to me.  

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46 minutes ago, RowanMinx said:

I don't see that as looking natural at all unless she's been running a marathon or just got out of the shower.  Personally, I don't care for overly shiny faces or bodies unless there's a reason for it.  It still looks like a layer of some kind to me.  

I completely agree with you! It does look sweaty or wet. I guess more soo its a skill i would like  to know how to do in photoshop when i need too/want too. I have not been editing photos that long ( almost two years maybe..) and i am collecting skills i suppose.  I know that it was achieved in photoshop as the before picture looked nothing like that, it had no shine at all too it. I think it would be cool to do that effect if i was getting out of the pool in a photo or the beach etc. Ofc i know the heads and bodies can do shines, i just wanted to be able  to do it manually in photoshop as a skill.  So i wanted a general idea of how maybe it was achieved. By Natural i meant it fits, but it is not smudged soo much that you cant make out the details of it.  Thanks for your help and ideas 😃

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I see what you're going for, and it can look natural with the right texture and specular settings. Skin shine can vary greatly. If you 'bake' the shine on the skin itself, then you're pretty much stuck with a certain look. However, using materials on skin with an applier can allow for variations and experimentation. Right now with the transition from WL to EEP, it will be a challenge to find a happy medium, but you can create a range of specular textures to put in an applier. You really don't need to worry about normal maps in this case since they don't offer enough resolution to give you a realistic bump effect.

The challenge will be painting the shine in just the right places. You can experiment with brushes and textures in Photoshop and then save them to your hard drive. Then, and here's the trick to save the cost of uploads, set the textures on your head using the "local" setting. Many creators have rezzable 'developer' heads where you can do this kind of test, but I'm not sure how they all handle adding specular maps. You could buy a cheap head that is modifiable like the Utilizator Normie for generic tests.

If you really want to dive in deep, the normal maps can be used, but only for the alpha channel. The alpha channel on normal maps varies the 'hardness' of the specular map shine. That way you can have a soft sheen on one area of the skin and a hard highlight on another.

https://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Material_Data

Edited by KjartanEno
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On 9/21/2020 at 5:05 AM, taurusthetiger said:

Well that is what people tell me who have offered help, they said its the materials on the head, but when i look at the before/afters of the pictures the artists doo its not, because the before pic does not have that at all.. here is a  more clearer image maybe of reference above, i can tell that was clearly done in Photoshop, just not really sure how it was achieved too look that realistic/natural.  

Here is a bigger reference picture, showing more of the face. https://prnt.sc/ukoe1j

Do you have the before shot that we can see?

It really does look like it's from the lighting and materials inworld.

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3 hours ago, taurusthetiger said:

 

See, it was not done inworld, I can tell alot of skin painting def.. totally different look. https://prnt.sc/umczjf

I'm no expert but the skin shine looks like dodge using skin brushes - you can google and download different ones.

Also, I wouldn't assume that the before shot is the only picture used. It's possible, but I find it odd and also unlikely that the photographer wouldn't make use of advanced lighting or materials when taking the picture. Taking multiple shots and layering them is a common technique. It's possible that the before shot is just one of the pictures taken. Probably the most basic one with no special lighting, etc. He/she probably then went on to take multiple shots, changing windlights, set-up, etc.

There are some tutorials on SL photography and editing, but you'll probably discover some tricks watching speed edits as well

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On 9/20/2020 at 8:05 PM, taurusthetiger said:

Here is a bigger reference picture, showing more of the face. https://prnt.sc/ukoe1j

That definitely looks like it's done with the specular layer on the head and in-world lighting, rather than post-processing.

That said, I think you could simulate it with use of the airbrush tool, an adjustment layer set to lighten, and some careful blurring.

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everyone here is correct in some way. I'm pretty sure this achieved using doge and burn tools on photo shop with other layers and tools. But this is only acivable because of the skin on the model already and the textures that are visible. You can try to fake this with textured brushes or layer textures. This is my thoughts on it good luck 👍 

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Looks to me like wind lighting, specular, materials and the new "pores" that makers are building into their mesh heads and bodies. There are so many useful ways to get this inworld, with no post-processing - especially if you have a beefy machine and can handle the Ultra settings.

Maitreya, Lelutka, Genus & Legacy right now, all offer the types of mesh that cater to inworld photography. Between the maps and shine, you can generally get a very very realistic look for highlights on skin. You can dial back on the levels of intensity so that its not wet or overpowering.

Sure, you could fake it in Photoshop, with a stippling brush, a separate layer dialed for opacity and the eye dropper for color matching, but why when you can probably get a more natural result with all of the newest tools? It really just depends on your tools at hand as well as where you want to focus your assets.

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