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what setting for substance painter export?


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I'd be very interested in this as well. Substance Painter used to come with a template specifically for SL that supported outputs that worked with SL's diffuse, normal, and specular options but, at some point in the past, the template disappeared. :(

Edited by Gordon Nadezda
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1 hour ago, Chic Aeon said:

SL uses png or tga.  The largest file you can import (for most viewers) is 2048 which becomes a 1024 automatically. Textures need to be "power of two" in size. 

i know , what i mean what kind of presets fits more for the sl import .

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1 hour ago, Kyrah Abattoir said:

You don't need another piece of software, keyshot is also extremely expensive.

No, no, I meant the Keyshot export settings in Substance Painter. What I got from the OP was they were asking what settings should they use to export.

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I don't upload SP exports directly to SL as I tweak them in Blender and Photoshop first, but at one point made a quick export preset to test in SL, which looks like this (old version, haven't upgraded my personal copy after Adobe acquisition).  Add glossiness channel in your texture set and export glossiness map as specular map.  SP's specular map doesn't seem to work too well.  Pick OpenGL normals instead of DirectX.  For texture sets with opacity channel (like glass) you'll need to add alpha to the diffuse in export settings.  Not too sure if my settings are optimized for SL but they seem to work for me.

Making output template is kind of confusing at first glance but pretty simple.  You are going to need to make custom settings anyways as you advance in the use of the software so better start early.   They have an updated tutorial video.

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As someone who currently uses Substance Painter I would have to say the answer to this isn't just one reply. My suggestion to you is if you follow basic substance tutorials it will explain the answers for you. There isn't one setting to do this. Some of this answer depends on the shader you are using. Is there an export to SL? No. Is there an export for SL? No. Is there a way to get specular, roughness, etc, yes. But, it's not one setting and click here and just export like this. You could have the proper settings to export and still may not produce the map you are after unless you understand Substance Painter. I refer you to tutorials on the export settings and tutorials on the shaders SP uses. The most basic Substance Painter tutorials that were put out officially by the company who creates the software will explain these things. Good luck!

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8 hours ago, Chie Salome said:

I don't upload SP exports directly to SL as I tweak them in Blender and Photoshop first, but at one point made a quick export preset to test in SL, which looks like this (old version, haven't upgraded my personal copy after Adobe acquisition).  Add glossiness channel in your texture set and export glossiness map as specular map.  SP's specular map doesn't seem to work too well.  Pick OpenGL normals instead of DirectX.  For texture sets with opacity channel (like glass) you'll need to add alpha to the diffuse in export settings.  Not too sure if my settings are optimized for SL but they seem to work for me.

Making output template is kind of confusing at first glance but pretty simple.  You are going to need to make custom settings anyways as you advance in the use of the software so better start early.   They have an updated tutorial video.

Thank you so much , ill try it ! 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Assuming you are trying to export 3 items

 

1 diffuse

2 normal map (OpenGL)

3 glossiness 

you can use the regular PBR export in the current version for 2 and 3.  For 1 simply use the 2d export which SL users has been asking for years for and they finally delivered it earlier this year (ish).

The 2d export basically exports what you see on the flat 2d map and works well for diffuse ready for your 3D program or Photoshop etc.  

If doing glass I wouldn’t bother with alpha and instead so that in your photo editing program as you can then control how transparent you want it to be.  So I use a basic chrome material when making “glass” effects.

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4 hours ago, Charlotte Bartlett said:

Assuming you are trying to export 3 items

 

1 diffuse

2 normal map (OpenGL)

3 glossiness 

you can use the regular PBR export in the current version for 2 and 3.  For 1 simply use the 2d export which SL users has been asking for years for and they finally delivered it earlier this year (ish).

The 2d export basically exports what you see on the flat 2d map and works well for diffuse ready for your 3D program or Photoshop etc.  

If doing glass I wouldn’t bother with alpha and instead so that in your photo editing program as you can then control how transparent you want it to be.  So I use a basic chrome material when making “glass” effects.

How do you make the 2D export not have directional lightning? 

I got the trial of SP but the 2D export was frustrating me. 

The 2D export reflected the lightning of the HDR you have selected. So the front was more lit than the back, and if you rotate the environment the more lit area changes. 

Is there a setting somewhere? Or another HDR? 

I run SL on ultra settings but when I see nice clothes or objects I disable the advanced lightning, which makes normal maps disappear from mesh and the difference is minimal. 

I could never make the diffuse map to have all the details on it as seen on 2D view. 

Edited by Reiramon
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That’s really getting into the basics of using SP.  You can control directional lighting via environment and I tend to find Studio 2 HDR the most useful.  I sometimes if doing a large building will cluster my bakes and then rotate my environment 90 degrees for the next cluster and so on to balance out some of that.  You can also apply a filter and activate two of the light options to further tweak directional lighting. 

The 2d export will exactly match the 2D viewport if you have set up your project correctly.   It won’t match the 3D view of course.  What settings are you also using to bake and what template?  I tend to bake at 2046 then reduce size down in photoshop for SL. So check your settings are high enough plus whilst SL may use OpenGL from memory there may be some buggy behaviour with SP and the 2d export so have a play when you export using DirectX instead just for the 2d part.

it seems you may be new to the application.  On the website they have tutorials you can get through the introduction ones in a few hours and it is well worth the time investment as it shows you how to manipulate elements like environments so you can control your directional lighting etc.

Always learn the interface first then apply it to the weird SL workflow we use rather than try to only learn the SL elements as it will be far quicker to get up to speed.  

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Diffuse in the RGB. Alpha may be Alpha Transparency, or Emission Map.

Specular Map is a bit weird. The RGB of specular is the Specular Color, the Alpha represents the Environment Reflections (Yeah I know, wtf Linden labs).

Normal Map RGB is the Normals. But the Alpha of the Normal Map is the actual Specular Highlight Map (seriously wtf Linden)


To get a correct Diffuse map, you will need to add lighting data for Second Life. Usually AOs, edge maps, and curvatures combinations will be good enough. You will also need to color your metals, as PBR relies on specular highlights to provide color maps. Baking a mostly even lighting scenario onto the diffuse map is also not a bad idea, as it helps makes it look better for Lower end systems, and assists Second life's lighting system by providing shadows it normally would not be able to make.

Specular is an oddball. The specular RGB node is going to be the Specular colormap which is fine. This will be predominantly white for non-conductive materials (most materials in the world). For metals, iridescent, exotic materials, and what have you, you'll want to add color to the specular highlights. The environment reflections is the Alpha map of the Specular texture. It reflects the environment around you.

Normal Maps. The RGB is the standard OGL tangent space normal map. The alpha channel however holds the actual glossy/specular map. This map is the one we all know to be dependent on point lights as well as the sun. This is responsible for how the object is illuminated in respects to light.

 

You will need to faf about with the Glossy and Enviornment to get a correct looking effect in all lighting conditions.

Edited by Cyrule Adder
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9 hours ago, Cyrule Adder said:

To get a correct Diffuse map, you will need to add lighting data for Second Life. Usually AOs, edge maps, and curvatures combinations will be good enough.

But don't overdo it, SL does have a lighting system after all.

9 hours ago, Cyrule Adder said:

Baking a mostly even lighting scenario onto the diffuse map is also not a bad idea, as it helps makes it look better for Lower end systems, and assists Second life's lighting system by providing shadows it normally would not be able to make.

But be extremely wary of how much texture load you add,it adds up quickly and on a full scene, every little bit helps. Good, well packed, well designed UV maps also allow you to get the most out of your textures.

Keep also in mind how "important" the baked details you are adding are: if no one notices that something isn't "there", it brobably isn't needed.

9 hours ago, Cyrule Adder said:

The environment reflections is the Alpha map of the Specular texture. It reflects the environment around you.

You can consider the environment value to be "somewhat" analog to metalness. And gloss to be "somewhat" analog to roughness.

The most convincing "gold" materials in SL have a specular color close to their diffuse but lighter, and a reasonable amount of environment.

Quick other note, anything shiny/reflective should have at least a small amount of environment because at night, with the low light, that is all you'll get.

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FYI, This has been answered recently, several times and in detail by myself and Scarlet Creative (that I know of), check those threads if you need detailed instructions..

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