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What are some of your favorite quotes?


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"I believe a dime can derail a freight-train.    
I believe there are alligators in the New York City sewer system, not to mention rats as big as Shetland ponies.     
I believe that you can tear off someone's shadow with a steel tent-peg.     
I believe that there really is a Santa Claus, and that all those red-suited guys you see at Christmastime really are his helpers.     
I believe there is an unseen world all around us.     
I believe that tennis balls are full of poison gas, and if you cut one in two and breathe what comes out, it'll kill you.     
Most of all, I do believe in spooks, I do believe in spooks, I do believe in spooks."

    ~Stephen King. Nightmares and Dreamscapes 

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   "I do not suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute of it."
   - Not Edgar Allan Poe.

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'What's it going to be then, eh?'
     That was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie and Dim, Dim being really dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening, a flip dark chill winter bastard though dry.

Opening of A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

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On 8/22/2020 at 6:48 AM, Amina Sopwith said:

Tucker's Law.

(Very sweary. I love Peter Capaldi but he was just too good as Malcolm Tucker. It made it impossible for me to accept him as Dr Who.)

Tucker is fantastic. He has so many quotes that can't be typed here without a series of asterisks showing up, especially from 'In the Loop'.

My favorite quote would be from US Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, when he set foot on the Moon as the second person to do so:

"Magnificent desolation".

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6 hours ago, Jerilynn Lemon said:

Tucker is fantastic. He has so many quotes that can't be typed here without a series of asterisks showing up, especially from 'In the Loop'.

It's amazing how little The Thick of It has dated. 

There are a few PG rated Tucker lines.

"Scruples? Scruples? What are they? Those low fat kettle chips?"

"You were like a sweaty octopus trying to unhook a bra. It was like watching John Nobhead at work." 

(Ok, might have been Leslie rather than Nobhead, but my version works even better.)

"This is like a clown running across a minefield."

(Actually, how many of these were probably inspired by Gor and Nobhead?)

Oh, I love Armando Ianucci. I haven't even started on Alan Partridge.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Most of the problems we've seen with virtual community these past seventeen years, most of the exploited vulnerabilities, most of the toxic trauma, most of the division and loss, could have been readily prevented with sound leadership.

Quote

If you are to be a leader
be patient in your hearing when the petitioner speaks,
do not halt him until his belly is emptied
of what he had planned to have said.
The victim loves to sate his heart
even more than accomplishing what he came for -
if a petition is halted,
people say 'but why did he break that rule?'.
Not everything for which he petitions can come to be,
but a good hearing is soothing for the heart.

20 (Papyrus Prisse column 9, lines 3-7), from Ptahhotep.

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Edited by Chroma Starlight
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7 hours ago, Lewis Luminos said:

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It's a philosophy I live by, and it's a shame that more people don't do the same.

Yeah, because nothing says "light-hearted" like the man who had to step away from life's truer higher pursuits to instead divert off to preserve as much of civilization from slipping into apocalypse as was the possible, even knowing that not even all the most precious things can be saved and that the loss is already staggering before the first battles were ever fought. Immortal spirit. When you tap into his ghost, I am certain that you find nothing but chuckles, smiles, and light-hearted fancies.

1200px-Lincoln_Lincoln_Park.jpg

 

Quote

In the great journal of things happening under the sun, we, the American People, find our account running, under date of the nineteenth century of the Christian era.--We find ourselves in the peaceful possession, of the fairest portion of the earth, as regards extent of territory, fertility of soil, and salubrity of climate. We find ourselves under the government of a system of political institutions, conducing more essentially to the ends of civil and religious liberty, than any of which the history of former times tells us. We, when mounting the stage of existence, found ourselves the legal inheritors of these fundamental blessings. We toiled not in the acquirement or establishment of them--they are a legacy bequeathed us, by a once hardy, brave, and patriotic, but now lamented and departed race of ancestors. Their's was the task (and nobly they performed it) to possess themselves, and through themselves, us, of this goodly land; and to uprear upon its hills and its valleys, a political edifice of liberty and equal rights; 'tis ours only, to transmit these, the former, unprofaned by the foot of an invader; the latter, undecayed by the lapse of time and untorn by usurpation, to the latest generation that fate shall permit the world to know. This task of gratitude to our fathers, justice to ourselves, duty to posterity, and love for our species in general, all imperatively require us faithfully to perform.

(...)

I do not mean to say, that the scenes of the revolution are now or ever will be entirely forgotten; but that like every thing else, they must fade upon the memory of the world, and grow more and more dim by the lapse of time. In history, we hope, they will be read of, and recounted, so long as the bible shall be read;-- but even granting that they will, their influence cannot be what it heretofore has been. Even then, they cannot be so universally known, nor so vividly felt, as they were by the generation just gone to rest. At the close of that struggle, nearly every adult male had been a participator in some of its scenes. The consequence was, that of those scenes, in the form of a husband, a father, a son or brother, a living history was to be found in every family-- a history bearing the indubitable testimonies of its own authenticity, in the limbs mangled, in the scars of wounds received, in the midst of the very scenes related--a history, too, that could be read and understood alike by all, the wise and the ignorant, the learned and the unlearned.--But those histories are gone. They can be read no more forever. They were a fortress of strength; but, what invading foeman could never do, the silent artillery of time has done; the leveling of its walls. They are gone.--They were a forest of giant oaks; but the all-resistless hurricane has swept over them, and left only, here and there, a lonely trunk, despoiled of its verdure, shorn of its foliage; unshading and unshaded, to murmur in a few gentle breezes, and to combat with its mutilated limbs, a few more ruder storms, then to sink, and be no more.

They were the pillars of the temple of liberty; and now, that they have crumbled away, that temple must fall, unless we, their descendants, supply their places with other pillars, hewn from the solid quarry of sober reason. Passion has helped us; but can do so no more. It will in future be our enemy. Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason, must furnish all the materials for our future support and defence.--Let those materials be moulded into general intelligence, sound morality, and in particular, a reverence for the constitution and laws: and, that we improved to the last; that we remained free to the last; that we revered his name to the last; that, during his long sleep, we permitted no hostile foot to pass over or desecrate his resting place; shall be that which to learn the last trump shall awaken our WASHINGTON.

Lincoln, January 27 1838 - http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/lyceum.htm

1151200487_VA_-_Raphael_The_Healing_of_the_Lame_Man_(1515).thumb.jpg.7d305a204f6906328ffa033d81b8f9df.jpg

Edited by Chroma Starlight
Party On edit
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27 minutes ago, Chroma Starlight said:

Yeah, because nothing says "light-hearted" like the man who had to step away from life's truer higher pursuits to instead divert off to preserve as much of civilization from slipping into apocalypse as is possible, knowing that not even all most precious things can be saved and the loss is already staggering before the first battles were fought. Immortal spirit. When you tap into his ghost, I'm sure you find nothing but chuckles, smiles, and light-hearted fancies.

1200px-Lincoln_Lincoln_Park.jpg

 

1151200487_VA_-_Raphael_The_Healing_of_the_Lame_Man_(1515).thumb.jpg.7d305a204f6906328ffa033d81b8f9df.jpg

You do realize that is a quote from Bill & Teds Excellent Adventure, right? No need to fill out a butthurt form over a quote from a comedy.. 

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images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS6Euh8vwKx2fv9q9ZO0BT

 

𝖂𝖍𝖊𝖓 𝖕𝖊𝖔𝖕𝖑𝖊 𝖘𝖙𝖔𝖕 𝖇𝖊𝖑𝖎𝖊𝖛𝖎𝖓𝖌 𝖎𝖓 𝕲𝖔𝖉,

𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖞 𝖉𝖔𝖓'𝖙 𝖘𝖚𝖉𝖉𝖊𝖓𝖑𝖞 𝖇𝖊𝖑𝖎𝖊𝖛𝖊 𝖎𝖓 𝖓𝖔𝖙𝖍𝖎𝖓𝖌;

𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖞 𝖆𝖈𝖖𝖚𝖎𝖗𝖊 𝖙𝖍𝖊 𝖋𝖗𝖊𝖊𝖉𝖔𝖒 𝖙𝖔 𝖇𝖊𝖑𝖎𝖊𝖛𝖊 𝖎𝖓 𝖙𝖍𝖊𝖒𝖘𝖊𝖑𝖛𝖊𝖘.

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