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That's a common experience for us introverts.  We can fake being outgoing pretty well when we have to.  True extroverts have a much harder time faking introversion. I taught large classes for abo

your feeble test is no match for the dark side...

https://www.16personalities.com/ I'm a Mediator (INFP-T.) I think that makes sense in the context of Second Life because I like to assume the identity of different types of avatars and see how pe

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20 minutes ago, Bagnu said:

I'm protagonist ENFJ-A  lol!!! Shouldn't surprise anyone who knows me in SL or RL!!!

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The only way anyone could ever lose by being my friend is by admitting it!!!

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2 hours ago, Rolig Loon said:

I've lost count of how many times I have taken the M-B evaluation.  I still view it largely as parlor game stuff,

I don't know.

When it comes to personality test in general (including IQ, EQ and SQ tests btw), they can never tell the whole story. People are far too complex and you'd have to violate Gödel's theorem to fully understand a human mind anyway. At best they can provide a simplified model. But then again, a simplified model can be very useful and informative as long as we remember that it doesn't tell the whole truth.

As for the MBTI test specifically, I'm a bit old fashioned when it comes to scientific methodology. I still believe that ideas like Hegel's dialectics model, adjusting your theories to the known facts rather than the other way round and always be ready to admit you're wrong when new evidence surfaces are more imoprtant for a work's credibility than the former glory of the university that pays your wages and how much facetime you've managed to grab on Discovery Channel and TED.

From that (possibly outdated) perspective at least Myer-Briggs' methodology seems to be about as sound as it is reasonable to expect. That doesn't mean it doesn't have some serious flaws though. It's rather old, it does appear to be at least a little bit culturally biased, it's all about self-assessment and it's to a large extent based on theories that can't really be tested empirically.

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4 hours ago, AdminGirl said:

It's really interesting reading everyone's results. A lot of those personality traits show in the forums and it's like, oh yeh I can see that! 😉

Yep.. it's sort of funny at times.  The more they try to be something different.. the more the really are just who they are and  only fooling themselves as to what they are.

 

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10 minutes ago, ChinRey said:

I don't know.

When it comes to personality test in general (including IQ, EQ and SQ tests btw), they can never tell the whole story. People are far too complex and you'd have to violate Gödel's theorem to fully understand a human mind anyway. At best they can provide a simplified model. But then again, a simplified model can be very useful and informative as long as we remember that it doesn't tell the whole truth.

As for the MBTI test specifically, I'm a bit old fashioned when it comes to scientific methodology. I still believe that ideas like Hegel's dialectics model, adjusting your theories to the known facts rather than the other way round and always be ready to admit you're wrong when new evidence surfaces are more imoprtant for a work's credibility than the former glory of the university that pays your wages and how much facetime you've managed to grab on Discovery Channel and TED.

From that (possibly outdated) perspective at least Myer-Briggs' methodology seems to be about as sound as it is reasonable to expect. That doesn't mean it doesn't have some serious flaws though. It's rather old, it does appear to be at least a little bit culturally biased, it's all about self-assessment and it's to a large extent based on theories that can't really be tested empirically.

I agree???. Mine fits me perfectly though.

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13 minutes ago, ChinRey said:

When it comes to personality test in general (including IQ, EQ.. etc

Some stuff can easily be recognized just by talking, for example we can understand if a person is an Extrovert or an Introvert depending on the persons reactions .

Of course all personality type tests fail if a person gives fake answers, its easy to change my ENTJ to INFP. Anyway these tests are just games and have no real value in life.

Regarding IQ tests and most of the Psychometrics on the internet for me they are rubbish..

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According to this website I'm INFJ (advocate) for years now - checked myself in the past, checked myself today. I think that test taken in the internet won't be as accurate as the actual meeting with a living person, professional / specialist, yet traits listed on this page describe me pretty well.

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The Advocate personality type is very rare, making up less than one percent of the population, but they nonetheless leave their mark on the world. Advocates have an inborn sense of idealism and morality, but what sets them apart is that they are not idle dreamers. These individuals are capable of taking concrete steps to realize their goals and make a lasting positive impact.

People with this personality type tend to see helping others as their purpose in life. Advocates can often be found engaging in rescue efforts and doing charity work. However, their real passion is to get to the heart of the issue so that people need not be rescued at all.

 

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i remember taking this test a long time ago at a weekend retreat and I was an INTP(the 5th category hadn't been invented yet I guess)I remember thinking at the time that the categorization was spot on.  I don't remember what it means now though.

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5 minutes ago, Lindal Kidd said:

I'm 600 grit sandpaper...just a little abrasive.

If you're finishing a glass or metal surface, 600 grit is for prepolish.  Not quite shiny enough to see your face in yet, but getting there.  ;) 

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Myers-Briggs style tests hold little interest for me these days. I've taken so many over the years that I can put my self in any of its 16 boxes with ease. If I were to average test results over time and space, I'd end up as (IIRC) XNXP, where "X" puts me right on the fault line between the sides of that particular characteristic. I've also discovered, unsurprisingly, that my surroundings have considerable impact on my position on the 16 square grid. If you put me in a room full of quiet introverts, I'll be the first to start drawing them out. If you put me in a room full of extroverts, I'll be content to observe.

The one trait not measured in any of the Myers-Briggs style tests, and for which I have an actual childhood medical diagnosis is... oppositionality.

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I have taken many of the M-B variants (including the official one, which included a 1:1 counseling session), and always come out INFP, but have never believed it. I am just not that mellow, I can be very reactive and angry. I think it is more that it is what I would like to be, so no matter how hard I try I tend to be less than honest when answering the questions. Over the years I have also had a lot of people who know me read the descriptions or even sit with me as I take an assessment. Like others have said in the thread, that is taking the whole thing too seriously and using it the wrong way, to look for my identity rather than just seeing my cognitive preferences, which is what the assessment is really supposed to tell you. I sort of accepted a few years ago that the M-B is not really that valid, and gave up on  it, but have spent most of my life trying to figure out who I really am. Or perhaps just accepting it.

One note on the validity, I often am far less definite on the Perceiving/Judging factor than on the others, and sometime not strongly Introverted, either. To me, this calls into question the whole validity of the instrument, as flipping any of the traits completely changes how you supposedly interact with the world. In an assessment like the Big Five, you just get a percent along the axis, and it doesn't assign some 'type' to you (though perhaps there are categories used for some purpose such as psychological/sociological/political research).

The Enneagram is another of these, that IIRC asks a lot of the same kinds of questions but put them on different axes, and winds up with 9 types. And while unlike astrology these sorts of tests start with info on the specific person rather than the alignment of some planets or something, in the end the types do seem a bit like astrological types, where people look for things that align with how they are and ignore things that don't. OTOH, I have known people who have taken one sort of these assessments or another (we have used a couple other similar things at my work over the years that pretty much do the same as the M-B) who won't even share their results or profile with others because they feel it describes them too well and invades their privacy. Some people are even creeped out as they feel like someone has been following them because the descriptions fit so well. In the end, I wonder if it is best to take all this as just something fun to do and not let it define you.

FWIW...

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10 hours ago, Drakonadrgora Darkfold said:

Yep.. it's sort of funny at times.  The more they try to be something different.. the more the really are just who they are and  only fooling themselves as to what they are.

 

Though my opinion of him has changed a lot as I have found out more about his personal life (he did some really messed up stuff to one of his partners, plus was one of those 'aren't I clever' guys~), so I don't quote him much anymore, David Foster Wallace said that in the end you become yourself (there was book by that name from the guy who traveled with him and interviewed him, and I think it was made into a movie, too).

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22 hours ago, Gopi Passiflora said:

https://www.16personalities.com/

I'm a Mediator (INFP-T.) I think that makes sense in the context of Second Life because I like to assume the identity of different types of avatars and see how people react to them. I may also "Role-play" too.

INFP-T on this one.

74% I

74% N

96% F

75% P

97% T

I was struck by how the questions highlighted how neurotic I am, lol. Not surprised though, am definitely one deeply flawed and effed up person.

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2 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

Myers-Briggs style tests hold little interest for me these days. I've taken so many over the years that I can put my self in any of its 16 boxes with ease. If I were to average test results over time and space, I'd end up as (IIRC) XNXP, where "X" puts me right on the fault line between the sides of that particular characteristic. I've also discovered, unsurprisingly, that my surroundings have considerable impact on my position on the 16 square grid. If you put me in a room full of quiet introverts, I'll be the first to start drawing them out. If you put me in a room full of extroverts, I'll be content to observe.

The one trait not measured in any of the Myers-Briggs style tests, and for which I have an actual childhood medical diagnosis is... oppositionality.

Pointing out that the other side has some validity can often be perceived as oppositional, and can also indicate a person doesn't want to be pinned down to absolute truths and so feels inclined to point out nuances. I don't know the details of your oppositional trait diagnosis of course and whether it matches my experience, but it has been my personal experience where those on 'my side' suddenly turn against me thinking I've gone to 'the other side' when I've pointed out valid truths of the 'other side's' position -- the side they're viewing totally as the enemy and so see no validity in their position whatsoever.

Even on an emotional level I easily drift into the role of creating balance if I'm not functioning in a super-conscious way. For example, if I entered a room of angry people displaying the type of anger that is not benefitting those involved, I can easily drift into the role of bringing the anger down -- to balance the room into a more healthy position. While this can be a good thing, it certainly can cause a disturbance and be seen as oppositional. I had to learn to do this consciously instead of functioning in a more liminal manner.

Watching my own behavior (as described above) I see one example of context or what is surrounding someone when they exhibit certain behavior as crucial, and tests don't easily pick this up, so I'm just not too keen on the accuracy of many personality tests.

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pppht

I've had to take M-B many times, the long, long versions, the short. I always come out INTP. So, high fives to the other Architects that posted here. When I took the test I was nearly at the borderline of I and E. Now I'm much further into the I. Things change over time.

Theoretically one of the rarest types, at 3-5% of the general population, INTPs are regarded as being the most intelligent group, as a whole, by MBTI. :D Yeppers. Just reporting the news. LoL

The thing that struck me most as being on point about the MB INTP was that INTPs process the world differently than others, and as a result are often misunderstood and alienated. Spot on that one.

But M-B is more and more being abandoned as not terribly useful. There is no reliable data showing MB types and work productivity or suitability. About 50% of people taking the test will score a different type if they take the test again, even as little as five days later.

Personally, I found the M-B useful to argue with. "Yes" to this trait and here's an example. "No" to this trait, and why.

M-B is largely based on Jungian psychology and has a lot of emphasis on archetypes. You know what also has a lot of archetypes in it? Astrology and tarot. As a matter of fact, an in-depth reading of my full astrology chart is probably more accurate than the M-B. (And I'm not talking about the 2-sentence newspaper proclamations for everyone born under one sun sign type of astrology.) So INTP or Cancer/Cancer rising w Moon in Taurus/Mars in Aries 9th house...? Meh. Take what works and leave the rest on the table.

I'm glad to see HR depts moving away from these stupid tests. Of course HR depts are the thorn in the sides of reasonable entities, and so no doubt HRs will just latch onto some other stupid way to put people into little boxes and not have to deal with actual people with actual ideas and experiences.

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I think that Myers Briggs can be useful when one is using it as an exploratory tool to gain insight about oneself, but like @Seicher Rae said, it's about as accurate as astrology or tarot and when used by HR departments to rationalize how they treat you it invariably gets abused.

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Won't deny it, this fellow nailed it with the ENTJ reaction, always do that regardless if Skype or RL and people start talking all together. Funny vid.

 

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LOL, I took it just for fun!!! It was accurate for me though. I guess because I'm so forward that it really couldn't be wrong!!!

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6 minutes ago, Nick0678 said:

Won't deny it, this fellow nailed it with the ENTJ reaction, always do that regardless if Skype or RL and people start talking all together. Funny vid.

 

Kind of nailed the INTP part too. :/  Although, honestly, I could relate to a lot of these, especially the "can we stay on point" ones. :)

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18 minutes ago, Seicher Rae said:

especially the "can we stay on point" ones.

That one works (for 4-5 minutes).

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43 minutes ago, Nick0678 said:

Won't deny it, this fellow nailed it with the ENTJ reaction, always do that regardless if Skype or RL and people start talking all together. Funny vid.

 

OMG - that was great.  Especially the ISTJ when he said "Really quick, could everyone who thinks this is a productive use of our time please raise your hand so I know who I can't be friends with anymore".  That is pretty much how I feel about every conference call I'm on.  His later follow-up about just doing it via email pretty much nailed my thoughts also.  And, of course, my close cousin ISTP's comment of "Yeah, I'm here.  I've been here the whole time.  I just haven't said anything cuz I don't care." is definitely what I'm "thinking, but don't say" on most conference calls.

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