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That or Trigger.. hehehehe

That one made my husband horny.. hehehehe I was watching this and he came in asking what the hell I was watching.. Then he started watching and well.. then just kept watching and before you know

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Needs more males:

ASMR Zeitgeist - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzGEGjOCbgv9z9SF71QyI7g

Harry ASMR - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvzx2dboYYyjHGzes8PLdTw

easyASMR - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLQ9fyHY7lIMATzUsaqE2IA

 

Well, not fully focused on that ASMR vibe, but at the same time quite some pioneers in the field:

Haircut Harry - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsqhsjDzOsrHF33mWkyfGHg

Nomad Barber - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0UKdAt1zgLtPd1ROad03uw

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4 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Watched Disney's The Sword in the Stone yesterday for the first time in a while. I always loved the song in this opening scene, not just the song itself but the singer's voice. Clear light brown with beautiful resonance and timbre and that lovely constant vibrato. Always get chills on the note when he sings the first syllable of "London". I don't know if this is ASMR, I don't get tingles and ASMR videos generally just annoy me, but it seems to be the closest I get and it's always with music or musical sounds.

I hate the way voices are so often compressed in recordings so even if there is that timbre, you can't hear it. It also means proper, un-autotuned, un-compressed, trained voices start sounding "thin" to  lot of people, even though that's what a real human voice sounds like, dips and shimmers.

 

yep, that did it for me. those chills feelings is what asmr is basically.

those chills are similar to the tingles, different people feel it different ways.

mine is music attuned when it happens and less basic sounds.

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5 hours ago, Anna Nova said:

It would be really nice if someone would define ASMR for those of us who don't follow popular American culture.

It seems to be about touchy-feely stuff, but what does ASMR actually mean?  I tried a websearch and got porn.

Thanks.

The Wikipedia page will give you some idea what it's about.

The definition of ASMR is both imprecise and fluid. It means what people want it to mean and you'll find increasing evidence of that as this thread advances.

I haven't listened to a lot of ASMR, but so far I've been fairly unaffected by it. In those cases where I do sense something, I've been able to modulate that feeling easily by "switching context". For example, in the chalkboard example above, though I do not find it terribly annoying or get any sensation from watching the video, if I look away and imagine myself sanding wood, the sound becomes mildly pleasant.

I fairly hate the sound of people eating near me. That's not uncommon. Restaurants are aware of this, as well as the strong correlation between noise induced stress, appetite and loiter time. I don't like noisy restaurants, but I don't doubt that they make me eat more and exit sooner after eating. A quiet restaurant, in which I could hear the sound of my compatriots chewing and smacking their lips, would kill my appetite while inviting long discussion after dinner. https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-9

Years ago, I was a little surprised to discover that I am probably affected by the sound of my own chewing, too... https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/308060

The spine tingling dread you feel when a door creaks in a scary movie is likely not ASMR. That's largely foreshadowing we've all learned from movie culture over time. The crinkling of a potato chip bag means approximately nothing to people until they develop an association of that sound with the treat inside. Dogs are "smarter" than humans, and learn that association PDQ. Mom quite enjoyed rustling bags of treats, or fiddling with the cookie jar lid to get the attention of her two children (Dad and me). We had so much fun plumbing the depths of that behavior that, at his funeral, we placed his ashes in... a cookie jar.

There will be a lot going on in this thread, only some of which falls under my understanding ASMR.

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3 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

This is what I found.. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response

 

Thanks.  And to everyone else.  The Wikipedia was best I think (usually is, and if I'd been awake I'd have started there)

I am officially uninterested in paresthesia.  But you just have to know!!!

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23 minutes ago, Drakonadrgora Darkfold said:

umm.. you used a wiki as a definition shame on you.. :P

everyone knows that wiki's are not creditable sources of information.

similar to these forums at times. :P

How about this... https://asmruniversity.com

In "The Science of ASMR->ASMR Research and Data" you'll find studies that distinguish musical frisson from ASMR, introduce the idea of "expectancy effect" (the creaking door I mentioned earlier) and suggest a "grooming" component. Jennifer Allen, the founder of the organization, who coined "ASMR" has evolved her thinking over time, as one might expect.

If you peruse that website, I think you'll agree that some of the examples others brought here under the guise of ASMR would not be recognized as such by ASMR University.

 

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
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I came across an interesting study tying ASMR & Frisson together in some respects, and explaining how mindfulness can induce these experiences. Lots of footnotes/authors for further study.

Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) and frisson: Mindfully induced sensory phenomena that promote happiness

"There are many important phenomena involved in human functioning that are unnoticed,misunderstood, not applied, or do not pique the interest of the scientific community. Among these,autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR)and frisson are two very noteworthy instances that may prove to be therapeutically helpful in promoting subjective well-being or happiness, which can be considered synonymous with mental health.This review attempts to elucidate the    characteristics of each phenomenon, including proposed similarities and differences between the two. We present an argument that ASMR and frisson are interrelated in that they appear to arise through similar physiological mechanisms, and both may be induced or enhanced through the practice of mindfulness."

http://asmrcommunity.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Autonomous-sensory-meridian-response-ASMR-and-frisson-Mindfully-induced-sensory-phenomena-that-promote-happiness.pdf

Mindfulness - Present Moment Awareness

Mindfulness is a state of active, open attention to the present. This state is described as observing one’s thoughts and feelings without judging them as good or bad.

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19 hours ago, Anna Nova said:

It would be really nice if someone would define ASMR for those of us who don't follow popular American culture.

It seems to be about touchy-feely stuff, but what does ASMR actually mean?  I tried a websearch and got porn.

Thanks.

I first started to experience ASMR as a child - when someone would play with my hair, or whisper in my ear, I would get a pleasant tingly sensation on my scalp which would travel down my body.  I also used to experience ASMR when watching a kids TV show hosted by the artist Tony Hart (you would have to be British, and of a certain age to remember him!☺️)  Tony would explain how he had made a picture in his crisp, soft spoken voice - and I would get lovely tingles all down my spine.  A lot of people say they experience ASMR when watching the artist Bob Ross on the TV show Joy of Painting, but while I do find him very relaxing to watch, I don't personally experience ASMR when watching Bob.  My favourite ASMR YouTubers are Gentle Whispering and Latte, especially their personal attention roleplay videos, where it's like being at the hair salon or having a facial.  There are lots of lovely sounds in those videos like hair brushing, or the sound of shampoo being massaged into the hair, or of moisturiser being rubbed into the skin.  (You also get the feeling of being pampered, which is always nice!☺️)  I also experience ASMR when I hear crinkly sounds, like tissue paper being gently scrunched.  Other people experience ASMR from sounds such as finger nail tapping, or certain words being repeated over and over again - but these do nothing for me.  And some like the sound of people chewing, which I find really annoying!  There are also visual ASMR triggers, like gentle hand movements.  It's just a case of finding out what triggers work for you, although apparently not everyone is able to experience ASMR.  My husband doesn't get it, and I've tried to explain to him what it is - but it's really hard to explain to someone who has never experienced it!  😕

Edited by LunaThyme
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On 6/15/2020 at 5:27 AM, LunaThyme said:

I first started to experience ASMR as a child - when someone would play with my hair, or whisper in my ear, I would get a pleasant tingly sensation on my scalp which would travel down my body.  I also used to experience ASMR when watching a kids TV show hosted by the artist Tony Hart (you would have to be British, and of a certain age to remember him!)  Tony would explain how he had made a picture in his crisp, soft spoken voice - and I would get lovely tingles all down my spine.  A lot of people say they experience ASMR when watching the artist Bob Ross on the TV show Joy of Painting, but while I do find him very relaxing to watch, I don't personally experience ASMR when watching Bob.  My favourite ASMR YouTubers are Gentle Whispering and Latte, especially their personal attention roleplay videos, where it's like being at the hair salon or having a facial.  There are lots of lovely sounds in those videos like hair brushing, or the sound of shampoo being massaged into the hair, or of moisturiser being rubbed into the skin.  (You also get the feeling of being pampered, which is always nice!)  I also experience ASMR when I hear crinkly sounds, like tissue paper being gently scrunched.  Other people experience ASMR from sounds such as finger nail tapping, or certain words being repeated over and over again - but these do nothing for me.  And some like the sound of people chewing, which I find really annoying!  There are also visual ASMR triggers, like gentle hand movements.  It's just a case of finding out what triggers work for you, although apparently not everyone is able to experience ASMR.  My husband doesn't get it, and I've tried to explain to him what it is - but it's really hard to explain to someone who has never experienced it!  

This is excellent, thank you.  Until I read this I was thinking 'psychological effect', but now I realise you are talking about something much more physical.  It may well be psychologically induced, but it is very physical.  True, I don't experience it, but now I understand a little.  Being a depraved sensualist by nature, I am off to search for my triggers...

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19 hours ago, Anna Nova said:

This is excellent, thank you.  Until I read this I was thinking 'psychological effect', but now I realise you are talking about something much more physical.  It may well be psychologically induced, but it is very physical.  True, I don't experience it, but now I understand a little.  Being a depraved sensualist by nature, I am off to search for my triggers...

I'm glad what I wrote actually made sense to you - like I said, it's difficult to explain! 😊  One bit of advice though - if you're going to be watching ASMR videos, make sure you wear headphones.  You need those trigger sounds to be right in your ears to experience those lovely tingles! 😉

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On 6/14/2020 at 3:56 PM, Madelaine McMasters said:

If you peruse that website, I think you'll agree that some of the examples others brought here under the guise of ASMR would not be recognized as such by ASMR University.

If you're talking about ASMR as the reaction in a person, anything could cause ASMR in a particular person. You couldn't say for a sure that a particular video couldn't possible do that, as it's very individual.

Whether it's ASMR as in the genre of videos is a different issue, because a fair number of people who watch/make ASMR videos get a different response to them. It ended up as a catch-all term for certain types of sensory video.

I personally don't experience ASMR, but I have sensory processing disorder and one of the ways I stim is through audio/visual things with repeated elements. ASMR videos often hit that perfectly. Which means I watch a lot of ASMR and I make my own, but not due to getting tingles. My own response is more that it helps me regulate sensory information and avoid overloads.

I don't like eating videos or slime much. I like tapping, crinkling paper, clinks of glass and china, and that sort of sound. My favourite roleplays are tea parties and sketching, as they generally have a lot of the background sounds I like. I disliked the whispering at first, though I've gotten used to it... I'd still take no talking or soft spoken over whispering given a choice.

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5 minutes ago, Polenth Yue said:

If you're talking about ASMR as the reaction in a person, anything could cause ASMR in a particular person. You couldn't say for a sure that a particular video couldn't possible do that, as it's very individual.

Whether it's ASMR as in the genre of videos is a different issue, because a fair number of people who watch/make ASMR videos get a different response to them. It ended up as a catch-all term for certain types of sensory video.

I personally don't experience ASMR, but I have sensory processing disorder and one of the ways I stim is through audio/visual things with repeated elements. ASMR videos often hit that perfectly. Which means I watch a lot of ASMR and I make my own, but not due to getting tingles. My own response is more that it helps me regulate sensory information and avoid overloads.

I don't like eating videos or slime much. I like tapping, crinkling paper, clinks of glass and china, and that sort of sound. My favourite roleplays are tea parties and sketching, as they generally have a lot of the background sounds I like. I disliked the whispering at first, though I've gotten used to it... I'd still take no talking or soft spoken over whispering given a choice.

One example given in another thread was the spine tingling sensation many people feel when hearing the "creaking hinge" in horror movies. That's more likely foreboding than ASMR, though someone never exposed to the the trope who still feels tingling might well be experiencing ASMR.

Similarly, people have discussed music as producing various sensations. Some of that might be ASMR, some of it is likely something else. There's quite a bit of research into our emotional responses to major/minor scales and various kinds of rhythms, regardless of the timbre of the instruments delivering the music. There might be overlap with ASMR there, but there are also cultural aspects that ASMR would not explain.

 

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22 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

Similarly, people have discussed music as producing various sensations. Some of that might be ASMR, some of it is likely something else. There's quite a bit of research into our emotional responses to major/minor scales and various kinds of rhythms, regardless of the timbre of the instruments delivering the music. There might be overlap with ASMR there, but there are also cultural aspects that ASMR would not explain.

 

People with ASMR seem to be describing the chills/tingles as pleasant sensations and, as I understand it, the ultimate purpose of the experience. I don't think that's how I'd describe my experience of chills and tingles from music or musical sounds. It's the music that gives me the pleasure; the chills and hairs rising on my arms and the back of my neck are more a sign of how beautiful the music is and the sound is what I'm seeking, not the chills. It's not that the chills aren't pleasant, but they aren't the key sensation I'm seeking. I keep hearing people say, "Oh, ASMR is amazing" but what I think is "Oh that music is amazing". And often enjoying the colour of it.

I don't know if what I'm experiencing is ASMR, though. I tried a few more ASMR videos. Some of the microphone scratch ones were sort of satisfying but I don't think it was the sound that got me going as much as the way they invoked the thought of a nice back scratch, which many people find pleasurable.

 

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14 minutes ago, Amina Sopwith said:

People with ASMR seem to be describing the chills/tingles as pleasant sensations and, as I understand it, the ultimate purpose of the experience. I don't think that's how I'd describe my experience of chills and tingles from music or musical sounds. It's the music that gives me the pleasure; the chills and hairs rising on my arms and the back of my neck are more a sign of how beautiful the music is and the sound is what I'm seeking, not the chills. It's not that the chills aren't pleasant, but they aren't the key sensation I'm seeking. I keep hearing people say, "Oh, ASMR is amazing" but what I think is "Oh that music is amazing". And often enjoying the colour of it.

I don't know if what I'm experiencing is ASMR, though. I tried a few more ASMR videos. Some of the microphone scratch ones were sort of satisfying but I don't think it was the sound that got me going as much as the way they invoked the thought of a nice back scratch, which many people find pleasurable.

 

The elicitation of chills and tingles by music can come from several mechanisms. There might be an ASMR component, but I think it's mostly tapping into our ability to process music, which is thought to be humanity's first language. In addition, there may be memories associated with a favorite song, or some anticipation built from your knowledge of the singer/group/genre.

Your second paragraph fits with the "grooming" explanation for ASMR.

 

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2 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

The elicitation of chills and tingles by music can come from several mechanisms. There might be an ASMR component, but I think it's mostly tapping into our ability to process music, which is thought to be humanity's first language. In addition, there may be memories associated with a favorite song, or some anticipation built from your knowledge of the singer/group/genre.

Your second paragraph fits with the "grooming" explanation for ASMR.

 

thing is this could be true about all asmr responses. they all could just be anticipated memories from certain past events. the event is just triggering a past memory response to be replayed.

its not always about the how or why it happens, its sometimes just about it happening and how it makes you feel that is important. not the ins and outs of what caused it.

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40 minutes ago, Drakonadrgora Darkfold said:

thing is this could be true about all asmr responses. they all could just be anticipated memories from certain past events. the event is just triggering a past memory response to be replayed.

its not always about the how or why it happens, its sometimes just about it happening and how it makes you feel that is important. not the ins and outs of what caused it.

We're approaching this from two different directions. From my scientific perspective, the how and why are very important.

https://www.wired.com/video/watch/neuroscientist-explains-asmr-s-effects-on-the-brain-the-body

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7 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

We're approaching this from two different directions. From my scientific perspective, the how and why are very important.

https://www.wired.com/video/watch/neuroscientist-explains-asmr-s-effects-on-the-brain-the-body

you have a point.. for me its not about the why or the how, just if it can be done and how it feels. sometimes understanding something too clearly can actually ruin the experience of it. it becomes to clinical and lifeless and boring. somethings are not really meant to be understood at a very deep level. they are just meant to be experienced and enjoyed.

i quit watching most tv because I did the same thing.. I tore ever episode of every tv show I watched apart until everything became to predictable and boring. no more excitement because I knew the ending before it happened..

the same can happen with asmr if you try to over analyze it and explain it. you become desensitized to the triggers and it happens less and less until it doesn't happen anymore at all.

Edited by Drakonadrgora Darkfold
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4 minutes ago, Drakonadrgora Darkfold said:

sometimes understanding something too clearly can actually ruin the experience of it. it becomes to clinical and lifeless and boring. somethings are not really meant to be understood at a very deep level. they are just meant to be experienced and enjoyed.

 

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2 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

 

for those like me it takes away the life and meaning and power of it. it makes it more dead and less alive. once you understand things too much there is less or little or no mystery about it. sometimes it is the mystery, the unknown factors that give it beauty to some people.

like magic.. learn how the trick works, and its less enjoyable to watch because there is no mystery left.

watch a tv show or read a book so many times you can relive it by memory alone it takes away the life of the show or the book. its no longer important if you focus on what is happening.. you already know it all.. this removes the joy in the experience for some.

I cant even watch horror movies anymore, I find them dull boring and lifeless because I have learned to tear them apart so much that the whole meaning of the movie is no longer important.

sometimes its the bigger picture that matters more than knowing all the details of it.

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30 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

the how and why are very important

I can appreciate a flower in the way described in the video, examining all the details, understand better the 'how and why',  and the experience can be wonderful.
But I can also experience a flower with a 'meditative gaze' where my 'thinking mind' is not involved and I am much more 'one with the flower'. This latter way is much more beautiful and is more true for me. My 'thinking mind' is a kind of trick, and specific only to human methods of analyzing and perception, and it can separate me from what is really there.

Edited by Luna Bliss
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It is beyond 'feeling'...and it doesn't have to involve mystery for me....I am....uh oh brace yourself Maddy....resonating with it...   :)

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