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12 hours ago, Mollymews said:

they can be if you stick your head in the oven to check what you're cooking.  I know right, but people do this. Stick their heads in places they shouldn't and then sue the manufacturer for not telling then they can fry their head when they do this

I hate when that happens..

hehehehe

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This graphic, which I saw over the road at VVO, distinguishes between the political and the non-political quite well, I think  

Why it can feel hard to talk about racial inequality, and why you should do it anyway.... So, anyway, as i mentioned in a couple of other threads, the company I work for gave us a paid day off in

Racism is defined as: prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one's own race is superior. You can't change the definition to

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On 6/10/2020 at 3:23 PM, Innula Zenovka said:

This graphic, which I saw over the road at VVO, distinguishes between the political and the non-political quite well, I think

3eb2913936bb4180a3b91da0396bd9e8.jpg

 

Also on the right side: "Are Communists bad?" "Is genocide bad" "Why do we need free speech? After all, there are never environmental crises that need protests, abusive police officers or government corruption to be protested, so let's ban free speech", "is X race bad?". But I usually mock before I block. 

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2 hours ago, mehllama said:

Also on the right side: "Are Communists bad?" "Is genocide bad" "Why do we need free speech? After all, there are never environmental crises that need protests, abusive police officers or government corruption to be protested, so let's ban free speech", "is X race bad?". But I usually mock before I block. 

Good for you.   

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On 6/15/2020 at 3:00 AM, Prokofy Neva said:

California is a completely different country than the rest of the United States. I recently bought a microwave oven. Scientists have proven for decades that microwaves do not cause damage to your health unless you do something stupid like put metal in it. But a big label on it said "For residents of California only" and proceeded to provide a warning that microwaves may be damaging to your health. Hilarious!

The New York Times reported that microwave weapons were the prime suspect in the cases of illness in US embassies in Cuba and China. The embassy employees likely have suffered brain damage.

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21 minutes ago, Bree Giffen said:

The New York Times reported that microwave weapons were the prime suspect in the cases of illness in US embassies in Cuba and China. The embassy employees likely have suffered brain damage.

Don't tell Prok but there is a lot of difference between microwave ovens and microwave weapons. ;)

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On 6/11/2020 at 10:41 PM, Akane Nacht said:

The majority ethnicity is Chinese where I live. I've heard some people claiming "Chinese privilege" is a thing, mimicking what is going on in Western countries. I don't think this is done in good faith. It is a sneak attack at people based on their ethnicity, delivered in such a way that they are unable to defend themselves without being labelled a bad person. It has upset Chinese friends of mine who are extremely good people and are hurt and confused by it. Happily it hasn't gained a lot of traction here.

To me that is both unkind and ineffective. Pointing fingers at any group on the basis of physical characteristics that they can't change is racism, plain and simple, in my books, no matter how you spin it. If you want to aim it at yourself, fine, but you speak for yourself alone.

IMO, if you want to tackle a systemic inequality, look at economic conditions, not skin tone. Make it possible for everyone to get a good education, support lower income groups to get out of poverty, and foster workplaces that hire on merit. It other words, it takes time and effort, as anything worthwhile does.

So would you say that classism (for lack of a better term) rather than racism is something we should be looking into? 

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On 6/11/2020 at 11:41 PM, Akane Nacht said:

IMO, if you want to tackle a systemic inequality, look at economic conditions, not skin tone. Make it possible for everyone to get a good education, support lower income groups to get out of poverty, and foster workplaces that hire on merit. It other words, it takes time and effort, as anything worthwhile does.

You have to look at both. As long as racial stereotypes prevail then POC will not be chosen for the positions which enable them to rise out of poverty.

Case in point, there was a study that clearly proved employers prefer Whites over Blacks and will choose them more often if given the chance.  In the experiment, job applications (White applicants vs Black applicants, equally qualified) were mailed to an employer. Black applicants revealed their race in various, subtle ways that would not make a difference in their qualifications  (for example, signing their application with a name such as 'Shanice' or 'Ebony' which are prominent names in Black communities).   Many more White applicants were chosen for the job.

The only conclusion drawn from this study is that employers thought Whites were more capable than Blacks overall, even though both had equal qualifications for the job.   So we have to address racial issues via changing stereotypes as well as address economic solutions to remedy the greater poverty in POC communities (and one economic solution that still needs to be in place is affirmative action).

https://www.nber.org/papers/w9873.pdf

~~~~

Article with many links to other articles and studies:

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/black-sounding-names-study_n_561697a5e4b0dbb8000d687f

"Students with stereotypically “black”-sounding names tend to be labeled as troublemakers by teachers. Job applicants with such names are less likely than their white-sounding counterparts to get called in for interviews. When residents with “black”-sounding names contact their local government for information about schools or libraries, they are less likely to receive a response. 

Adding to this troubling compendium of results is a disturbing new study, published Thursday in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior. The study of mostly white participants shows that men with black-sounding names are more likely to be imagined as physically large, dangerous and violent than those with stereotypically white-sounding names.

Dr. Colin Holbrook, a research scientist at the UCLA Center for Behavior, Evolution, and Culture and lead author of the study, said that he has “never been so disgusted” by his own data."

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18 hours ago, Yhishara Cerise said:

 

So would you say that classism (for lack of a better term) rather than racism is something we should be looking into? 

For systemic problems, yes. 

When people fall through the cracks of society, and are stuck in poverty in an otherwise wealthy and peaceful country, the reasons tend to be complicated. It never boils down to ethnicity alone. Physical health and mental health for example are huge factors, combined with resources to seek treatment. What struggling people need first and foremost is for people to listen to them, and understand what they need (hint: it's not all the same thing). Can't do this on social media either, you got to go face to face.

I've done this in my work and volunteering - it's emotionally draining and exhausting, and complicated and messy. The more hands the better though, so if that's a cause that interests you, that's awesome and I wish you well.

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7 hours ago, kali Wylder said:

image.png.a223c654442cce5ad4d697de289a2f67.png

Kali, I've been watching this thread quietly since you started it.

I just want to say how much I admire you for undertaking it, and for what you've said here. (And what many others have said, as well, of course.)

Thank you for it.

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1 hour ago, Akane Nacht said:
21 hours ago, Yhishara Cerise said:

So would you say that classism (for lack of a better term) rather than racism is something we should be looking into? 

For systemic problems, yes. 

This very well may be true where you live, Akane  (you mentioned a Chinese speaking country?)  But the situation in the US is very different and prejudice is the primary reason Blacks have so much poverty in comparison to Whites.  Blacks have been the latrine of America, starting with their enslavement. Socialization perpetuates the stereotypes present in our unconscious minds.  Until we start knowing they are equal to us and so allow them the same opportunities we (whites) have this will continue.  Each of us (in the US) is responsible to see where we may be harboring bias, and change our perceptions.

* Test after test after test has demonstrated that we do not judge Blacks as equal to Whites - we believe more often they are criminal, incompetent, and unequal to Whites in so many other ways too.  This affects hiring practices, education,  the ability to get bank loans to start businesses, and the necessary self-esteem so crucial to function well in life...and more.

 

  

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6 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Kali, I've been watching this thread quietly since you started it.

I just want to say how much I admire you for undertaking it, and for what you've said here. (And what many others have said, as well, of course.)

Thank you for it.

Thanks Scylla, it's not been an easy journey, but it's well worth taking.  I'm hoping that if we continue to acknowledge whats wrong with the system, we have an opportunity here to really change things for the better.

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7 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

* Test after test after test has demonstrated that we do not judge Blacks as equal to Whites - we believe more often they are criminal, incompetent, and unequal to Whites in so many other ways too.  This affects hiring practices, education,  the ability to get bank loans to start businesses, and the necessary self-esteem so crucial to function well in life...and more.

 

There are parts of racism that stem from behavioral and cultural perceptions.  How much a fear of a different culture plays a part in our abilities to mingle as a society, and especially pre-Civil Rights Movement, is something I haven't seen brought up in these threads.  Could part of racism then be thought one's culture is superior as well?  One thing I did not like brought up in one of these threads (by one particular poster) was that the Hispanics are willing to do the menial jobs other people won't do.  Isn't that kind of importing a sort of "slave labor"...importing people to do the menial jobs as one poster in one of these threads said regarding BLM.  I see that kind of thinking towards importing more slave labor as just a continuum of the WASP mentality.  

But, here's a bit on racism and it's perceived "behavioral" and "cultural" differences.   I still believe our power to reach equality is through enacting laws rather than hoping an elected will affect a change.  How can an elected affect a change when there are no specific laws?   We, the people, enact the laws.  The politicians are hired to uphold the laws as set forth by the people.  

Racism is the belief that groups of humans possess different behavioral traits corresponding to physical appearance and can be divided based on the superiority of one race over another.[1][2][3][4] It may also mean prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against other people because they are of a different race or ethnicity.[2][3] Modern variants of racism are often based in social perceptions of biological differences between peoples. These views can take the form of social actions, practices or beliefs, or political systems in which different races are ranked as inherently superior or inferior to each other, based on presumed shared inheritable traits, abilities, or qualities.[2][3][5]

In terms of political systems (e.g., apartheid) that support the expression of prejudice or aversion in discriminatory practices or laws, racist ideology may include associated social aspects such as nativism, xenophobia, otherness, segregation, hierarchical ranking, and supremacism.

While the concepts of race and ethnicity are considered to be separate in contemporary social science, the two terms have a long history of equivalence in popular usage and older social science literature. "Ethnicity" is often used in a sense close to one traditionally attributed to "race": the division of human groups based on qualities assumed to be essential or innate to the group (e.g. shared ancestry or shared behavior). Therefore, racism and racial discrimination are often used to describe discrimination on an ethnic or cultural basis, independent of whether these differences are described as racial. According to a United Nations convention on racial discrimination, there is no distinction between the terms "racial" and "ethnic" discrimination. The UN Convention further concludes that superiority based on racial differentiation is scientifically false, morally condemnable, socially unjust and dangerous. The Convention also declared that there is no justification for racial discrimination, anywhere, in theory or in practice.[6]

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6 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

One thing I did not like brought up in one of these threads (by one particular poster) was that the Hispanics are willing to do the menial jobs other people won't do.  Isn't that kind of importing a sort of "slave labor"...importing people to do the menial jobs as one poster in one of these threads said regarding BLM. 

I believe you're talking about me, and I didn't call it "menial". Menial means something entirely different, and I never once said laborers working in low paying jobs are doing menial work. The jobs they do are absolutely back-breaking and they should be paid far more than what they are, and treated far better. The truth of the matter is that the Mexican immigrants do take those jobs, and someone has to because California would come to a standstill without them. Since many of them are undocumented workers, they aren't in a position to demand better pay and conditions. Unemployment pays more, and if a person is a US citizen, they're going to take unemployment over working harder for less money picking crops. 

Far from menial, I would call them essentialThey aren't imported here - they come willingly because it's still better than what they can make in Mexico, and yes, they are often treated no better than as slave labor even though, as I said, they are absolutely essential to the economy of California. As a matter of fact, I went back to make sure of what I said:

"The jobs that many immigrants work are jobs that even the poorest white person thinks is beneath them. They work their asses off, and they deserve far more than they receive in about a billion ways."

You might want to consider why you defaulted to the word "menial" when thinking of low paying jobs. Please don't twist my words into saying something I didn't say. 

From Merriam-Webster:

menial - noun
me·nial | \ ˈmē-nē-əl  , -nyəl \
Definition of menial
 (Entry 1 of 2)
: a person doing menial work specifically : a domestic (see DOMESTIC entry 1 sense 4) servant or retainer 
menial
 adjective
Definition of menial (Entry 2 of 2)
1: of or relating to servants : LOWLY 
2a: appropriate to a servant : HUMBLE, SERVILE 
b: lacking interest or dignity
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22 minutes ago, Beth Macbain said:

I believe you're talking about me, and I didn't call it "menial". Menial means something entirely different, and I never once said laborers working in low paying jobs are doing menial work. The jobs they do are absolutely back-breaking and they should be paid far more than what they are, and treated far better. The truth of the matter is that the Mexican immigrants do take those jobs, and someone has to because California would come to a standstill without them. Since many of them are undocumented workers, they aren't in a position to demand better pay and conditions. Unemployment pays more, and if a person is a US citizen, they're going to take unemployment over working harder for less money picking crops. 

Far from menial, I would call them essentialThey aren't imported here - they come willingly because it's still better than what they can make in Mexico, and yes, they are often treated no better than as slave labor even though, as I said, they are absolutely essential to the economy of California. As a matter of fact, I went back to make sure of what I said:

"The jobs that many immigrants work are jobs that even the poorest white person thinks is beneath them. They work their asses off, and they deserve far more than they receive in about a billion ways."

You might want to consider why you defaulted to the word "menial" when thinking of low paying jobs. Please don't twist my words into saying something I didn't say. 

From Merriam-Webster:

menial - noun
me·nial | \ ˈmē-nē-əl  , -nyəl \
Definition of menial
 (Entry 1 of 2)
: a person doing menial work specifically : a domestic (see DOMESTIC entry 1 sense 4) servant or retainer 
menial
 adjective
Definition of menial (Entry 2 of 2)
1: of or relating to servants : LOWLY 
2a: appropriate to a servant : HUMBLE, SERVILE 
b: lacking interest or dignity

Also, a lot that do take those types of jobs are more than likely doing them because they were doing them in their old country as well.. I'm sure not all but many..

I know we had a bunch in our old company temp service that the new company had gotten rid of..They were working for the temp service and not us..

There were die casters and setup guys and process techs, Quality control and on the production lines.. A lot of good people that i really liked.. They always would joke with me..hehehe

I didn't even know they were illegal until we got a letter from the new company.. I was always told they had green cards..

Some of those guys were there for a good while..I would ask, are we ever going to hire any of these guys.. I would always be told, they didn't want to leave the temp service in case something better came along..

They weren't making much less,..I think a dollar less  from the hiring rate, which was 15.00 an our for say,starting pay on the production line..

I was sad to see them go..

 

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1 hour ago, Beth Macbain said:

believe you're talking about me, and I didn't call it "menial". Menial means something entirely different, and I never once said laborers working in low paying jobs are doing menial work. The jobs they do are absolutely back-breaking and they should be paid far more than what they are, and treated far better. The truth of the matter is that the Mexican immigrants do take those jobs, and someone has to because California would come to a standstill without them. Since many of them are undocumented workers, they aren't in a position to demand better pay and conditions. Unemployment pays more, and if a person is a US citizen, they're going to take unemployment over working harder for less money picking crops. 

Far from menial, I would call them essential

Oh, I see you said low paying jobs.   If it's under the table, then we don't even know what that pay is, and could equate to "slave labor".  It is a type of slave labor no matter how you want to spin it.  

As far as from what I've seen in California in regards to non-crop jobs, you can hire a worker off the street curbside.  Hispanics stand on the street looking for day jobs in California.  Most of the day jobs are in construction of some kind and are back-breaking work no matter who is working in construction.  It's a very tough job.  Many Hispanics in California will wait around the Home Depots and other building centers as well looking for a day or two of work.  It's not a healthy condition for them to work in, and if they are injured, they have no where to go for help.  Some fortunately, if they are good, will be employed by a construction or handyman service who has a license and is looking out for them at least a little bit better than just being picked up off the street by who knows who.  

As far as crops, many migrate for a time, but there are people of other skin tones that pick crops as well.   With the loss of the unions, it's put others at risk.  

However, things changed here with the nearly 10-year drought but even if there hadn't been a drought with almost less than 1" of rain some years, the workers still deserve better and safe working conditions rather than "slave labor". 

California survived fine and has been importing more crops and food from Mexico then ever before.   The number one item that comes across the border into California is food from Mexico.  Most of the produce in our stores is from Mexico.  Our local farmers food is still eaten but may have a higher price tag and end up in the upper middle class food stores such as Whole Foods Market where a bag of cherries is $17 dollars.  California is still said to not have surpassed the drought yet.  The drought has changed things in California.  We import food from Mexico now.  

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On 6/14/2020 at 3:24 AM, Dano Seale said:

It's a lot easier in the UK.
Born in the UK - "British".
Born outside of the UK - "Bloody foreigner!".

 

Oh my gosh, we have even more in California than was shown on the chart.  We have mixed race also plus others I can't remember.  And, oh my gosh, California publishes forms in at least 20 languages if not more.  While our language barriers were difficult to over-come in the past and caused people to set up different towns especially in big cities - New York, Chicago - with Polish town, German town, Italian town, Irish town, and on and on, with the advent of the internet and cable TV, there are ways for foreigners to get news and TV programs in their own language here in California today.  Language barriers could be difficult to deal with in times of great emergency but we seem to be doing okay thanks to now cable TV and the internet.

It's been a very interesting experience to live and work with people from all over the world.  

But, to move on to something not addressing your post Dano, but in regards to the white privilege as has been brought up in many of these threads, I think it is far more an upper middle class white privilege than most people realize rather than all whites.  From Colonial times until the time of the Civil Rights movements in America in the 1960's, it was mostly the WASP culture; today it is thought to be more of the WASPS turned into the "Ivy leagues" that are really achieving the upper middle class white privileges and pretty much are the ones whom have the most power.  Many of our Ivy leaguers (coined word) are not willing to associate with Blacks under any circumstances.   My ex-husband was born and raised in Philadelphia.  He grew up in white and black separated neighborhoods and my ex also told me the whites and blacks hate each other in Philadelphia.  It's simply thought not proper for them to associate with each other but why they hate each other...my ex said "they just do".   Parts of what are known as the North East are very much upper middle class white/Ivy leaguers.  The thing here is most Ivy Leaguers end up as bosses.  

A poster in this thread brought up is it really racism or classism?  It's both, but classism I think is doing the most damage as the upper classes control most of the jobs and the real estate in some areas.  

Well, I still say laws can make a difference and yes in America we can enact laws that are currently not included in the U.S. Constitution.  The majority of the power control has always been in white hands in America though.  So, even though I'm Polish, my family is kind of okay with some of the Ivy Leaguers...I'm passable, sort of, sometimes but not always, not hardly.  lol  

A bit about the Ivy Leagues

The Ivy League is an American collegiate athletic conference comprising eight private universities in the Northeastern United States. The term Ivy League is typically used beyond the sports context to refer to the eight schools as a group of elite colleges with connotations of academic excellence, selectivity in admissions, and social elitism.[2][3][4][5][6] Its members in alphabetical order are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Yale University.

While the term was in use as early as 1933, it became official only after the formation of the NCAA Division I athletic conference in 1954.[7] Seven of the eight schools were founded during the colonial period (all except Cornell, which was founded in 1865) and thus account for seven of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The other two colonial colleges, Rutgers University and the College of William & Mary, became public institutions instead.

Ivy League schools are viewed as some of the most prestigious universities in the world.[8] All eight universities place in the top seventeen of the 2020 U.S. News & World Report national undergraduate university rankings, including four Ivies in the top three (Columbia and Yale are tied for 3rd). U.S. News has named a member of the Ivy League as the best national undergraduate program in each of the past 18 years ending with the 2018 rankings: Princeton eleven times, Harvard twice, and the two schools tied for first five times.[9] In the 2019 U.S. News & World Report global university rankings, three Ivies rank in the top ten (Harvard 1st, Columbia 7th, and Princeton 8th) and six in the top twenty-three.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivy_League#:~:text=Its members in alphabetical order,Princeton University%2C and Yale University.

 

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24 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

A poster in this thread brought up is it really racism or classism?  It's both, but classism I think is doing the most damage as the upper classes control most of the jobs and the real estate in some areas.  

Or is it a case where the problem is one of being traumatized by freedom, as this speaker eloquently puts it:

 

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1 hour ago, Arielle Popstar said:

Or is it a case where the problem is one of being traumatized by freedom, as this speaker eloquently puts it:

 

I had to look this person up on the internet and found an article wherein he was discussing his book "White Guilt".  

Mr. Steele is a very wordy person to say the last and he tends to say so much it gets all jumbled like endless rambling.  Though I did find a bit to copy and paste below.  

After reading the article, as far as the North East Ivy Legues, my ex's brother and sister-in-law are Ivy Leaguers, they had such amazing jobs that happened from the tech boom, they retired at 40 from stock.  From what I know of Ivy Leaguers, they don't have much white guilt placed upon them as they are in management positions.  Management is different from the working class.  My ex's sister-in-law was Vice President of a very rich and famous every day used vital tech company.  Management is pretty much off limits to the "white guilt" pressure this man is talking about.   Classism is very real and very prejudiced.  You'd have to be quite naive to think otherwise.   I can tell you about my ex brother and sister in law, they don't care.  You could try to stigmatize them in some way but they'd think you are loony because if you are not white Ivy League you are not white Ivy League.  The other thing about the higher echelon is most workers don't even get to meet this kind of Ivy League higher upper management people, only a very select few ever will in these types of Fortune 500 businesses.   Plus, a lot of these Fortune 500 types of businesses operate with private offices; you don't get to interact with them; they correspond mostly through memos.  But, honestly, they don't care.  They only want to associate with white wealthy people as their "friends".

From Mr. Steele (about his book "White Guilt")

Why’s that important? It’s important because if you are stigmatized as a racist in American society—an institution, let’s say. It’s easier, I think, to see on the institutional level. Then that institution becomes illegitimate. It loses its legitimacy. It loses its ability to really function in this society. So the stigma, again, has a powerful impact, because it has so much control over legitimacy. How can you be a legitimate institution in a multi-racial society that is supposed to be free, and everyone is supposed to be equal under the law—how can you be legitimate if you don’t have any blacks in your institution?

So we could look at a disparity like that—blacks could—again, moral authority having passed to us. We could look at a disparity like that, and we could say you don’t have any blacks in your institution. It’s a racist institution. It’s illegitimate. We will sue it. We will do whatever it takes. And in a sense since the ‘60s that’s pretty much what has been —what has happened is that minorities have begun to sort of manipulate that stigma. We call it some circles today the race card. Play the race card. What does the race card mean? Well, if you don’t do what I want you to do, then you’re going to be stigmatized as a racist, and the price you’ll pay is you’ll lose your legitimacy.

So white guilt is a powerful, powerful force. Not because people feel guilty, but because people are stigmatized, and again have to prove the negative all the time, and living forever under threat of being stigmatized.

This leads to the next phenomenon that is a feature of white guilt, and that’s dissociation. The only way to get away from the stigma of being a racist is to find some way to dissociate oneself from the stigma, from the image that you are a racist. That you are like the whites of old. That you still secretly are a white supremacist. That you still secretly believe in this. That you may be smiling, but your heart is still committed to racism. And so again, whites walking around under this sort of cloud of suspicion then have to find ways to dissociate themselves from that.

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On 6/25/2020 at 1:31 AM, Luna Bliss said:

Case in point, there was a study that clearly proved employers prefer Whites over Blacks and will choose them more often if given the chance.  In the experiment, job applications (White applicants vs Black applicants, equally qualified) were mailed to an employer. Black applicants revealed their race in various, subtle ways that would not make a difference in their qualifications  (for example, signing their application with a name such as 'Shanice' or 'Ebony' which are prominent names in Black communities).   Many more White applicants were chosen for the job.

The only conclusion drawn from this study is that employers thought Whites were more capable than Blacks overall, even though both had equal qualifications for the job. 

Not denying it doesn't happen, however as a business owner I can say there is a lot more to a resume than you think and these experimental studies may have jumped to a biased conclusion depending on how those people conducting the study understand the intricacies of resumes.

There is a reason why people have jobs specifically providing resume writing on your behalf as, despite what people think and perhaps even those who conducted the study think, it isn't just a piece of paper showing your skills and qualifications or even about being equally qualified. It comes down to many more subtle things that may or may not get you the job or next interview. The fact that those studies you mentioned seemed to imply that it is purely about being equally qualified shows perhaps this bias.

To name a few things that are looked at majorly with regards to a person getting or not getting a job not based on equal qualifications: Format and layout, length of the resume, cover letter, whether that person has the right non-work related experiences and likes, whether there are multiple resume's submitted with identical formatting or from a word doc template (meaning you hired a pro to get it created and therefore show a lack of creativity or confidence), what non-work activities or hobbies you have (showing your personality as to whether you are outgoing, adventurous, a leader, introverted, group orientated etc). I could go on and on. Resume's aren't a situation of black or white (non race just the phrase), there are many things that an employer looks at rather than just a name or whether 'x' person has equal qualifications to 'y' person.

Like I said, cant guarantee that in some cases there isn't bias towards race, however the study is flawed from the get go if they are basing their entire study on whether a resume gets accepted by a potential employer based on "but this resume is exactly the same qualification wise than the other".

I think it may surprise you that from reading what they did to the resume's formatting etc listed under their title 'Creating a bank of Resumes' the average employer or HR department worth their salt, would be able to identify what they did. The fact that they used a template from a work agency shows this further as I mentioned before receiving multiple resumes that are the same looking is a negative.

Another issue is as an example, they list while at school employment experience or volunteering experience as a key thing they changed. When I look at resumes I don't even care about that kind of thing as 99% of the time it is irrelevant to the job being applied for or mostly is for such a small period of time they couldn't have garnered enough experience for it to matter. Also there is no mention as far as I could see of references. Did they accept calls from those employers asking further for information about that person and if so how did they screen them so as the same employer didn't receive the same fake reference on the phone?

Like I said, resume writing is complicated as is the reading of it and so unless that study included as part of an appendix the exact copy of those resumes as evidence so people can read what they all said and how they were formatted, that study is simply a lot of text with no substance.

Edited by Drayke Newall
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