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On 7/15/2020 at 11:04 AM, Jordan Whitt said:

or just a complete unwillingness to accept that other people have differing opinions - and that it's okay and allowed (or should be).

sorry but in an era when people can get fired or  even be acused of hate crimes for dumb jokes posted on social media years ago, how anyone sane can freely have different opinion? they keep their opinions hidden scared as hell for their jobs and lives.There will never be a real debate as long one side have the power to punish the others for the opposite opinions.

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This graphic, which I saw over the road at VVO, distinguishes between the political and the non-political quite well, I think  

Why it can feel hard to talk about racial inequality, and why you should do it anyway.... So, anyway, as i mentioned in a couple of other threads, the company I work for gave us a paid day off in

Racism is defined as: prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one's own race is superior. You can't change the definition to

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15 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

Men have talked to me and told me if a man goes to prison he is b****, the men become their b****es.  Women have been sexually violated in prison too and are called the same and are considered "the b****es" same as the men.  My Black friend whom moved to the East Coast in September also told me of how men are treated in prisons, as b****es.  

Well, yes i suppose they could be treated that way by other inmates. Survival of the fittest rules in medium and higher prisons. 

16 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

I've been "told" by important men in my life.  It's been in prison movies as well, the guards calling the men the b****es.  It's been said in movies for example by a prison guard "Your my b**** now."

I thought it was "drama" with the movies and the men in my life who told me these things.  I never knew that about the 13th Amendment until recently from BLM and the protesting.   So, my conclusion is, it's true.  Prisoners are slaves. 

Its not as prevalent as you have been told. My uncle works in MCI Cedar Junction which is a Max security prison here and has told me that the "prison b***h" trope is very much over played in TV and movies. No one is beaten into the role. Its a bartering chip if you will. They act as ... women and get protected. 

Prisoners are NOT slaves. They get 3 squares a day, a roof and bed, TV Newspapers, books and online schooling. They are NOT beaten by the guards. Their wives and children are not sold to strangers, their daughters are not raped. You really need to stop equating prisoners with slaves.

Read the room a bit.. 

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It actually says right there in the 13th Amendment that you can be made a slave as a part of a criminal conviction. This is used quite frequently to force prisoners to work without compensation...

 

1 hour ago, Drake1 Nightfire said:

Passed by Congress on January 31, 1865, and ratified on December 6, 1865, the 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States and provides that "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States

 

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35 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

So, my conclusion is, it's true.  Prisoners are slaves. 

I am from a totally different country so those amendments don't matter here but i have to be honest on this, i wouldn't mind knowing that they "properly treated like a bish" the "police officer" who killed using his knee showing no respect at all for human life (like he was some kind of pitbull in the arena killing its prey) that fellow Floyd while he was crying for his mother and telling them so many times he can't breath and i don't care if Floyd had previous criminal records or whatever, they had him with hand cuffs and under control.

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19 minutes ago, Nick0678 said:

"properly treated like a B**** (bleep)

I can't post what I want to say about this because I am being censored.

I don't know if I can even quote the above and if this post will go through or not, so I am changing the wording.

But, no, just no.  Sexual abuse should not be used as a punishment for a crime.

Kicked where the sun does not shine, maybe, but the rest no.  The being a slave because of a crime is not what human beings should do to others and the whole of slavery of any kind should be abolished.    

But, even when I say "kicked" it doesn't make up for what happened and it's not right to treat a beating with another beating; a killing with another killing.  It just is perpetuating violence.  But, should the officer be on death row?  Probably.  

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2 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

I can't post what I want to say about this because I am being censored.

I don't know if I can even quote the above and if this post will go through or not, so I am changing the wording.

But, no, just no.  Sexual abuse should not used as a punishment for a crime.

Kicked where the sun does not shine, maybe, but the rest no.  The being a slave because of a crime is not what human beings should do to others.  

Perhaps you people there are more civilized then us idk but here we would probably beat the sh*t out of him on site before the other person died and i am not overreacting.

Police officers and the Law should be respected but not when they are committing a crime on plain sight, actually thats the reason they are not allowed to use their weapons here unless of course they have been shot first but then again we are not allowed to carry weapons neither.

Actions like these are disgusting especially when a Police Officer who is supposed to protect you and sometimes even from your own self and foolishness is acting like that.

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45 minutes ago, Pussycat Catnap said:

It actually says right there in the 13th Amendment that you can be made a slave as a part of a criminal conviction. This is used quite frequently to force prisoners to work without compensation...

 

 

Yep, even those doing community service is a form of slavery.. rather than doing their punishment in a jail cell they are cleaning roads..

And basically if they work under the minimum wage as well, like prisoners do..

I was just watching a little documentary this morning about that one island off New York where they use it for pretty much just a public grave yard..

The prisoners that bury the bodies get 0.50 cents per hour..

If you ever seen the movie Brubaker it goes into how the prisoners were being used by companies and paying the prison for cheaper labor.. it goes into more than that, but it touched on it pretty good..

It was something pretty much used nation wide but from what I read really slowed down in 1930, in the extreme way they were doing it I mean..

I haven't done a lot of reading on it,but from the little bit I had, it was pretty bad.. the population of blacks in prison in states like Mississippi when it was going strong was like 90%..

I'm just grazing the topic from memory..But it used to be really bad but still, prison and jail uses a legal form slavery..

 

Almost forgot..this goes a little over the movie Brubaker.. it's a pretty good movie for like the 70's or 80's..whenever it was made..

 

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31 minutes ago, Nick0678 said:

Perhaps you people there are more civilized then us idk but here we would probably beat the sh*t out of him on site before the other person died and i am not overreacting.

Police officers and the Law should be respected but not when they are committing a crime on plain sight, actually thats the reason they are not allowed to use their weapons here unless of course they have been shot first but then again we are not allowed to carry weapons neither.

Actions like these are disgusting especially when a Police Officer who is supposed to protect you and sometimes even from your own self and foolishness is acting like that.

The out of uniform police officer who beat my nephew and my sister on their property when my nephew was taking out the trash, I might not care about what happened to him.  But, I don't want to recall my own families horror story into too much length because I've talked about it already.   But, just a quick recap, my sister didn't talk for nearly 8 years and wouldn't eat or drink or shower or move, and we are white.  I believe my sister has very serious PTSD from this beating but I was told she was depressed.   My sister was in the hospital for almost 8 years but she is home now with her husband and my nephew lives in another state where we feel he is safer.  I believe my nephew and sister may have been beaten by this out of uniform police officer because my nephew was growing a marijuana plant.  Now, that was stupid yes for my nephew to do, but this beating they both took on their property is complete insanity.   Since the officer was out of uniform, my sister did sue for $100,000 and won but even that court experience took so much out of her, I often wonder if it was even worth it for her to go through.  My sister wanted her son to get his teeth fixed and other things that the police officer ruined on his face, which she did do, and then began to do downhill emotionally for a long time into what the doctors said was "depression" though she did tell me she suffered nightmares for a long time.   

As far as what I was speaking about was the mostly non hardened criminals.  Those in poverty who live in desperation and those who commit crimes while under the influence as most crimes are committed while under the influence of a drug or alcohol.

I think we need to do away this slavery criminal law altogether though and to put people who commit non-violent offenses in rehab.  

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3 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

The out of uniform police officer who beat my nephew and my sister on their property when my nephew was taking out the trash,...

I see. Well i will be honest with you and btw i am not some kind of anarchist actually in my culture/society you could say i am conservative but not the way conservatives are in your country. Different cultures different ideas you understand that.

First of all it doesn't matter if your nephew is of European origin, native American, Asian or African, Christian, Muslim, Atheist or whatever we are all humans and he is a citizen of the United States and even if he wasn't a U.S citizen it really doesn't matter.

So this cop comes without his uniform and beats him roughly because your nephew had a "funny" plant.. 

It probably was against the Law but seriously now is he part of a Drug Cartel shooting people or a Serial Killer? (personally i am against drugs, even avoid alcohol but that doesn't matter) .

If the Police Officer wasn't on active duty performing Narcotics Operations along with other officers when he did that what was he doing there?

Also did he have to use force because he was being threatened? If yes there should be a report for his injuries.

It sounds to me that you guys have a serious problem and police officers with all the respect are acting like they are above the Law. There is Justice, there is Law but there is also what we call ethically right and wrong. All those police officers should go have psychological tests, be re-evaluated , be EDUCATED because they act like warlords and learn to respect human life. I know they also have to face a lot of danger and many pay with their lives but i am certain the "right" ones will pass the tests and be happy to serve the citizens.

Those 100.000 USD don't mean anything to me and you know why? Because if they didn't come from his pockets those are tax payers money. They will cover some expenses for your sister but how much money are enough when a life is lost. In Floyds case, whatever his criminal record was he didn't deserve that way to die and all the money in the world cannot bring him back.

I assure you that where i am, regardless of political ideology the people that i have talked about it (i happen to have friends who are capitalists, socialists, anarchists and yes communists too) we all wished we were there to stop that policeman from killing Floyd because nobody who has basic logic and considers himself human approves murder.

Regarding non-violent offenses you should had already done that... yesterday! Do it. Force your politicians to work together on such serious matters about society regardless of political party. They can argue on other stuff.

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36 minutes ago, Nick0678 said:

So this cop comes without his uniform and beats him roughly because your nephew had a "funny" plant.. 

It probably was against the Law but seriously now is he part of a Drug Cartel shooting people or a Serial Killer? (personally i am against drugs, even avoid alcohol but that doesn't matter) .

If the Police Officer wasn't on active duty performing Narcotics Operations along with other officers when he did that what was he doing there?

Also did he have to use force because he was being threatened? If yes there should be a report for his injuries.

It sounds to me that you guys have a serious problem and police officers

I believe the marijuana plant was part of it although the out of uniform police officer said he did it because my nephew was playing loud music and it was disturbing his mother.  

The man sounds completely out of his mind.  

Yes, it's obvious there are serious problems with police officers here because he could have killed my nephew and sister.

It appears some police officers may view the lowly citizens as the devil's spawn or something even if they were speeding in a car and they feel justified.   But, it sounds more like Nazi's than anything to me.    

Some take matters into their own hands and do whatever they please because they have something called qualified immunity or they believe they are immune to any responsibility to their most evil and criminal actions and it is entirely insane.  

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2 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

t was disturbing his mother.  

Ok look i do have enormous respect towards mothers. they get a lot of sh*t in their life but being a cop he should had figured out a way to teach the young man that what he was doing was annoying, not punch him straight to the hospital. Did he make his mother proud by beating a kid?

6 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

Some take matters into their own hands and it is entirely insane.  

Thats what i noticed. Not saying Police officers in my country are guardian angels, there's no such thing as a perfect country and we are also far from perfect , so yes we do have criminality etc and many of police officers have illegal activities but they don't murder people in cold blood maybe once you will hear something every 15-20 years and don't act like apes.

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14 minutes ago, Nick0678 said:

Ok look i do have enormous respect towards mothers. they get a lot of sh*t in their life but being a cop he should had figured out a way to teach the young man that what he was doing was annoying, not punch him straight to the hospital. Did he make his mother proud by beating a kid?

I know...why couldn't he knock on the door and say "could you please turn the music down; it's annoying my mother".  The time was 4:30 in the afternoon.  My sister was cooking dinner and my nephew went to take out the trash when he was jumped onto the ground by the out of uniform police officer who came up behind him and began beating him to a pulp in the face.  

Well, my nephew suffers some nightmares at times but he's been doing much better with family in a different state for now.  He's with his Uncle's family.  

As far as how this man continued as an officer, I don't get it either.

It's said we have Fascists police here in some respects.    Some (not all) do act like Nazis with their qualified immunity they voted in for themselves.  The people never voted for the police to have qualified immunity.  Qualified immunity means more or less they are not responsible for their actions and cannot be sued.  The George Floyd case is changing all that though.   It's not going to all happen overnight but it is beginning to change regardless of what Trump says or not because in Los Angeles County where I live, a lot has changed already.  As of about a month ago, 150 million dollars has been set aside for programs for people instead of funding for police through 2021 as well as first responders in the Los Angeles will be unarmed when it's a non violent case.  More things will change I am sure.   Since it's middle of the fiscal year, Los Angeles set aside 150 million through 2021, so another whole deal needs to be set up beginning in 2022.

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3 hours ago, Paladin Tyran said:

sorry but in an era when people can get fired or  even be accused of hate crimes for dumb jokes posted on social media years ago, how anyone sane can freely have different opinion? they keep their opinions hidden scared as hell for their jobs and lives.There will never be a real debate as long one side have the power to punish the others for the opposite opinions.

Sadly, you are 100% correct in what you have said here.

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1 hour ago, FairreLilette said:

Well, my nephew suffers some nightmares at times but he's been doing much better with family in a different state for now.  He's with his Uncle's family.

I am glad your nephew is doing better and hope all work out for the best for him and he becomes useful and responsible person for your society.

1 hour ago, FairreLilette said:

Qualified immunity means more or less they are not responsible for their actions and cannot be sued.

What immunity? Theres no such thing here, you do the crime you do the time. Even those that have been shot (on duty) and had to shoot will go to the court and the whole case will be judged if their action was according to the laws. Immunity is only for the politicians and nobody else. (Even they get to vote in the parliament to remove immunity for specific cases and many times send other politicians to the court)

1 hour ago, FairreLilette said:

As of about a month 150 million dollars has been set aside for programs for people instead of more police through 2021 as well as first responders in the Los Angeles will be unarmed when it's a non violent case.  More things will change I am sure.   

That is great second step should be psychological tests, re-evaluation and EDUCATION. Seriously why i say that, i happened to work in the past with a few americans who were ex U.S military (submarines) and after retirement they worked on other fields. They all gained my respect not because they were ex military (why would i care never fought for my country, right) but because due to their job they traveled the world and were social and educated people. They had manners, they knew how to respect people at least that's what i noticed. Police officers there are the exact opposite, they act like sociopaths. That needs to change.

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This is so sweet. I just sent this book to my grandson -- named The Little Book Of Little Activists:

A celebration of political activism by America's youngest citizens--our children.

You're never too young to care about your community or to stand up for your beliefs. That's the empowering message of this book, which is all about how real kids exercise their first amendment rights.

Filled with inspiring photos of children at recent demonstrations and rallies, The Little Book of Little Activists also includes inspirational quotes from kids themselves on topics of equality, diversity, and feminism, as well as an introduction by Bob Bland, co-chair of the Women's March on Washington, and an afterword by civil rights activist Lynda Blackmon Lowery, author of Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March. Five percent of gross proceeds go to benefit the Children's Defense Fund.

The Little Book of Little Activists is a child's very first introduction to political activism, presented at a level that they can understand and relate to. Perfect for parents who want to raise their kids to become participatory members of a democracy.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0451478541/ref=cm_sw_r_em_apa_i_uYMaFbXTGF7XX

Edited by Luna Bliss
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A good article too, named "Raising A Little Activist", by Gabriela:

RAISING A LITTLE ACTIVIST

As the child of immigrants, I got to see the struggle firsthand. My parents immigrated to the U.S. from Mexico in 1966. They had only the clothes on their backs, a bit of hard-earned money, dreams, and a lot of determination. Against all odds they persevered and ultimately succeeded. Their plight as immigrants in this country fueled my passion for activism.

Strapped into a baby carrier, my daughter marched for women's rights and picketed with nurses for safe staffing. Quite literally, she learned to protest before she learned to walk. We participated in protest playdates at ICE, City Hall, and Nancy Pelosi's Congressional office, calling for a stop to immigrant family separations. She marched in support of DACA and in celebration of the legacy of MLK. 

We started reading children's books about activism to her early on, starting with "Feminist Baby" and "The Little Book of Little Activists." Still, each time we participated in a protest or march the same questions would arise. How can I facilitate the development of her own relationship with activism? How can I empower her to advocate for herself and others? How will she connect with the struggle, when she is so far removed from it? 

My answer came at a Mother's Day family separation protest we attended together. An immigrant mother shared her harrowing journey to the U.S. from Central America. I teared up, her story moving me to my very core. My daughter asked why I was crying. What followed was a short talk about my immigrant roots, privilege, and our role in advocating for separated families. There was a moment of silence. I wondered if I had shared too much, or too little, and just how much she had understood. Seconds later, she matter-of-factly said, "I never want to be separated from you. The niños should be with their families." She understood. And in that moment, a fierce little activist was born. I'd spent so much time worrying about the how, that I'd forgotten to trust in the power of connection and empathy. And most importantly, in her heart.

Watch out, world. She's listening, she's learning, she's generation Alpha.

These are a few of my daughter's favorite books on activism:

The Little Book of Little Activists

Side by Side/Lado a Lado

Kid Activists: True Tales of Childhood from Champions of Change 

https://www.momsrising.org/blog/raising-a-little-activist

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2 hours ago, Nick0678 said:

What immunity? Theres no such thing here, you do the crime you do the time. Even those that have been shot (on duty) and had to shoot will go to the court and the whole case will be judged if their action was according to the laws. Immunity is only for the politicians and nobody else. (Even they get to vote in the parliament to remove immunity for specific cases and many times send other politicians to the court)

Here is some explanation of qualified immunity in America and the police:

In the United States, the doctrine of qualified immunity grants government officials performing discretionary functions immunity from civil suits unless the plaintiff shows that the official violated "clearly established statutory or constitutional rights of which a reasonable person would have known".[1] It is a form of sovereign immunity less strict than absolute immunity that is intended to protect officials who "make reasonable but mistaken judgments about open legal questions",[2] extending to "all [officials] but the plainly incompetent or those who knowingly violate the law".[3] Qualified immunity applies only to government officials in civil litigation, and does not protect the government itself from suits arising from officials' actions.[4]

Through the ruling in Pierson v. Ray (1967), the U.S. Supreme Court first introduced the qualified immunity doctrine in 1967, originally with the rationale of protecting law enforcement officials from frivolous lawsuits and financial liability in cases where they acted in good faith in unclear legal situations.[5][6] Starting around 2005, courts increasingly applied the doctrine to cases involving the use of excessive or deadly force by police, leading to criticism.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qualified_immunity

2 hours ago, Nick0678 said:

I am glad your nephew is doing better and hope all work out for the best for him and he becomes useful and responsible person for your society.

Thank you.  Yes, it's pretty awesome.  He's a good kid and a kind kid.  

 

2 hours ago, Nick0678 said:

That is great second step should be psychological tests, re-evaluation and EDUCATION. Seriously why i say that, i happened to work in the past with a few americans who were ex U.S military (submarines) and after retirement they worked on other fields. They all gained my respect not because they were ex military (why would i care never fought for my country, right) but because due to their job they traveled the world and were social and educated people. They had manners, they knew how to respect people at least that's what i noticed. Police officers there are the exact opposite, they act like sociopaths. That needs to change.

Yes, that is being talked about as well which is regular mental health check-ups plus ways to have a more impartial justice system to try an officer should he be found killing a man as the officer did to Mr. George Floyd.   Some kind of more impartial system will be set up as well as compensation to families should something go array.  All of what I am saying is for the country of Los Angeles.  Each state will have to set up their own police reform.  As far as other counties in Southern California, they may follow L.A. County on this across the board.  

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7 hours ago, FairreLilette said:

Through the ruling in Pierson v. Ray (1967), the U.S. Supreme Court first introduced the qualified immunity doctrine in 1967, originally with the rationale of protecting law enforcement officials from frivolous lawsuits and financial liability in cases where they acted in good faith in unclear legal situations.[5][6] Starting around 2005, courts increasingly applied the doctrine to cases involving the use of excessive or deadly force by police, leading to criticism.[7]

Sounds "bs" to me, here there's no such thing as immunity. Many civil servants will not do their job right and they will be covered by their work environment for being lazy or even corrupt but police officers understand the risks they take if they use excessive force on duty. Shooting/killing people is not an option, they don't even have the right to remove their gun from the holster unless they have been shot at or if they are doing operations against organized crime.

Most officers in Crowd/Riot Control Units go unarmed, have a shield, their stick and an officer who handles tear gas.

But we are also unarmed and don't fool around with guns. We can use specific types under license for hunting/sports and should always be disassembled,. There are only a few licenses for self defense due to terrorism threats when it comes to businessmen. They are considered "high risk" targets.

(of course there are illegal guns but why would you have one if you are not a troublemaker,  "for self defense" simply doesn't exist here go learn tae kwon do)

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8 hours ago, FairreLilette said:

qualified immunity in America and the police

Good news on this!

Senate passes sweeping police reform bill, limits qualified immunity protections

"Dubbed the Reform, Shift + Build Act, the bill creates a certification system for officers and third-party committee to oversee decertification proceedings. It bans the use of deadly and excessive force tactics like chokeholds and requires other officers to intervene when they witness their peers commit misconduct. The bill emphasizes de-escalation over punitive enforcement and allocates money to social and community programs.

The Senate passed a sweeping reform police package hours before daylight broke this morning, ending a 5-day stalemate over changes to qualified immunity protections for police that split Democrats and generated days of protests in front of the State House.

“This begins the long, necessary work of shifting power and resources to Black communities and communities of color who have, for too long, faced criminalization and punishment instead of investment,” said Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz, D-Boston, following the roll-call vote of the Senate.

The bill now moves to the House, where it faces a fresh round of review. House leaders have already committed to a “public process for soliciting feedback” later this week — something opponents of the bill say the Senate skipped. It’s likely to face backlash from law enforcement agencies who have already spoken out in opposition, particularly to changes to qualified immunity that protects police from lawsuits in connection with misconduct on the job."

https://www.bostonherald.com/2020/07/14/senate-passes-sweeping-police-reform-bill-limits-qualified-immunity/

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2 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

Good news on this!

Senate passes sweeping police reform bill, limits qualified immunity protections

"Dubbed the Reform, Shift + Build Act, the bill creates a certification system for officers and third-party committee to oversee decertification proceedings. It bans the use of deadly and excessive force tactics like chokeholds and requires other officers to intervene when they witness their peers commit misconduct. The bill emphasizes de-escalation over punitive enforcement and allocates money to social and community programs.

The Senate passed a sweeping reform police package hours before daylight broke this morning, ending a 5-day stalemate over changes to qualified immunity protections for police that split Democrats and generated days of protests in front of the State House.

“This begins the long, necessary work of shifting power and resources to Black communities and communities of color who have, for too long, faced criminalization and punishment instead of investment,” said Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz, D-Boston, following the roll-call vote of the Senate.

The bill now moves to the House, where it faces a fresh round of review. House leaders have already committed to a “public process for soliciting feedback” later this week — something opponents of the bill say the Senate skipped. It’s likely to face backlash from law enforcement agencies who have already spoken out in opposition, particularly to changes to qualified immunity that protects police from lawsuits in connection with misconduct on the job."

https://www.bostonherald.com/2020/07/14/senate-passes-sweeping-police-reform-bill-limits-qualified-immunity/

Whatever comes out of it, hope it is signed into law..

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10 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

Good news on this!

Senate passes sweeping police reform bill, limits qualified immunity protections

"Dubbed the Reform, Shift + Build Act, the bill creates a certification system for officers and third-party committee to oversee decertification proceedings. It bans the use of deadly and excessive force tactics like chokeholds and requires other officers to intervene when they witness their peers commit misconduct. The bill emphasizes de-escalation over punitive enforcement and allocates money to social and community programs.

The Senate passed a sweeping reform police package hours before daylight broke this morning, ending a 5-day stalemate over changes to qualified immunity protections for police that split Democrats and generated days of protests in front of the State House.

“This begins the long, necessary work of shifting power and resources to Black communities and communities of color who have, for too long, faced criminalization and punishment instead of investment,” said Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz, D-Boston, following the roll-call vote of the Senate.

The bill now moves to the House, where it faces a fresh round of review. House leaders have already committed to a “public process for soliciting feedback” later this week — something opponents of the bill say the Senate skipped. It’s likely to face backlash from law enforcement agencies who have already spoken out in opposition, particularly to changes to qualified immunity that protects police from lawsuits in connection with misconduct on the job."

https://www.bostonherald.com/2020/07/14/senate-passes-sweeping-police-reform-bill-limits-qualified-immunity/

It's only for the state of Massachusetts, its their state Senate and House you are referencing-not at the national level.

https://www.wwlp.com/news/state-politics/massachusetts-senate-passes-reform-shift-and-build-act/

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13 minutes ago, Gage Wirefly said:

It's only for the state of Massachusetts, its their state Senate and House you are referencing-not at the national level.

https://www.wwlp.com/news/state-politics/massachusetts-senate-passes-reform-shift-and-build-act/

All journeys begin with one step!

I should quote the author of these wise words of wisdom by Lao Tzu, who said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step".

Edited by Luna Bliss
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5 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I should quote the author of these wise words of wisdom by Lao Tzu, who said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step".

..and I was taught in school (college? Dunno) that if with each step you crossed half the distance, you will never actually reach your target / goal.

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Really like this plan, as so much of this extreme, armed, military-style policing is not needed:

City of Berkeley Approves Police Defunding Plan

 

Major changes are coming to the streets of Berkeley.  The city council is moving forward with a plan to stop using police officers to make traffic stops, a move that could cost the police half their budget.

The early morning decision by the city council aims to flat-out change how police operate in the city of Berkeley.

The plan is to take traffic enforcement out of police hands in favor of enforcement by unarmed city employees.

The police would also stop responding to homeless outreach and mental health crisis management calls. Instead, the city would create an unarmed community safety coalition, and pay for it by cutting the police budget in half.

"I think we can do this thoughtfully," said Berkeley Mayor Jesse Arreguin. 

The mayor approves the plan but admits there will be disagreement.

"What a person in the hills thinks is safety may not be what a person in the flatlands thinks. We need to have that conversation around, what does health and safety mean for our community," he said. 

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/east-bay/city-of-berkeley-approves-police-defunding-plan/2326874/

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