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This graphic, which I saw over the road at VVO, distinguishes between the political and the non-political quite well, I think  

Why it can feel hard to talk about racial inequality, and why you should do it anyway.... So, anyway, as i mentioned in a couple of other threads, the company I work for gave us a paid day off in

Racism is defined as: prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one's own race is superior. You can't change the definition to

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2 hours ago, Akane Nacht said:

If compensation takes a material form and is derived from state funds, would that not be personal to taxpayers? 

if the State were to take your neighbour's property and not compensate them for it, and then sell their land to you and then the State used the money to provide a school house for your children instead of making you pay for the schoolhouse thru your taxes, then would you understand that your neighbour would be aggrieved by this ?

if the State were to take your property and not compensate you, then would you feel aggrieved ?

if you raised this matter of your own property, or your neighbour's property, being confiscated by the State  and the State said yes you have a point, but the property is no longer in our possession because we sold it, and the only compensation we the State can offer now is for you and your neighbour to go down to the welfare office for a dole check until you get a job, then would you be aggrieved by this ?

 

edit add

i want to add a bit more to this

capitalists who are into constitutional rule of law understand these matters far more so than any other type of person.  They see these matters as questions of property rights and not as questions of human rights. When treated as questions of property rights then welfare payments are not a factor in the solution. Property has a capital value, a capitalist expects capital compensation not welfare

 

Edited by Mollymews
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5 hours ago, Mollymews said:

if the State were to take your property and not compensate you, then would you feel aggrieved ?

Mine, yes. My great-great-great grandfather's? Nope. I see no point in dwelling on things long done by people I never knew.

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3 minutes ago, Lyssa Greymoon said:

Thanks, I was unaware that "long before anyone now living was born" meant April 2016.

I think you misread what I wrote about the period I was referring to.

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16 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

They may have had it harder than whites did, but they still did it and have it better than where they were..

If that keeps happening over and over.. Those rising up will chip away  over time at that foundation of what was holding them up..

life is relative in so many ways.. Chop a tree at the trunk and all the branches fall with it..

But then again if you look at a tree's trunk at the first branch system as it grows and rises up..You will see the same pattern branch system in the rest of the tree where it branches and out into the leaves..

Pick a tree and you'll see..

Drop some seeds where we need them and just watch them grow..

This is so true Ceka all of what you said about generations and parents and each generation getting better as I read through your posts.  

And, it is better for Blacks and other POC and women too.  But, yes, we know there is still work to be done.   I am so grateful to have lived in multi-ethnic communities instead of how my grand-parents had to live in Polish town only.  I wouldn't want us all divided up like that and be forced to live in just one part of town, Polish town, and pushed into there by the Police.   

It's exciting today as I write this that Joe Biden wants to pick a Black female Vice Presidential running mate.  Mr. Biden has his eye on several female Black Senators from whom he wants to choose from.   He's known them awhile.  He just doesn't know which one he wants to pick yet as all are worthy to him.  

I mean this is exciting, the first Black and female Vice President.  And, take into account, Joe Biden is old and not in optimum health, so what would that leave.  Why, it would leave the first Black female President of the United States.  I don't mean to just say Joe Biden is old because Donald Trump is old too.  They both have heart conditions.  But, still this is incredible news.  Joe Biden will not officially announce his Vice Presidential nominee until August the article said, but he has his eye on a few female Black senators and these are the ones he is going to pick from.    

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23 minutes ago, Akane Nacht said:
6 hours ago, Mollymews said:

if the State were to take your property and not compensate you, then would you feel aggrieved ?

Mine, yes. My great-great-great grandfather's? Nope. I see no point in dwelling on things long done by people I never knew.

Speaking about America and not your country, how separate are we from the past really? The wealth we have in America was built on the backs of those we stole land from (Natives), and those we enslaved (Blacks), decimating both of their cultures to varying degrees in the process. In other words, we grew as a wealthy nation because we abused them. And all this occurred not so long ago really.
Now I'm not saying vast amounts of wealth should be taken from those living today who had nothing to do with the abuse -- I certainly don't want my cozy little cottage I live in to be yanked from me. But I would be willing to pay a few dollars more in taxes to help these cultures that, still today, suffer from what we did to them in the past.

You mentioned helping those less fortunate in your community. How did they get that way? Barring major crises and deprivations in present circumstances, the deprivation is passed on through the generations via inadequate parenting. One generation is abused so severely (in America, say Native Americans), that their culture is decimated and they are not able to parent adequately, and so their children are not able to successfully parent the succeeding generations. And so here in the US we have rampant alcoholism on the reservations, and the wrecked, miserable, and wasted lives that accompany this disease.

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30 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

But I would be willing to pay a few dollars more in taxes to help these cultures that, still today, suffer from what we did to them in the past.

My family wasn't even here... My mother was British and my father's grandfather came over from Germany... but I absolutely wouldn't mind paying a couple bucks extra in taxes for reparations to both the ADOS community and the Native American community. Now I donate to organizations involved in those communities, but it sure would be grand if our government did the right thing and those organizations became unnecessary because we're actually taking care of ALL our people. 

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58 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

You mentioned helping those less fortunate in your community. How did they get that way? Barring major crises and deprivations in present circumstances, the deprivation is passed on through the generations via inadequate parenting. One generation is abused so severely (in America, say Native Americans), that their culture is decimated and they are not able to parent adequately, and so their children are not able to successfully parent the succeeding generations. And so here in the US we have rampant alcoholism on the reservations, and the wrecked, miserable, and wasted lives that accompany this disease.

I'm not so sure a little bit of tax payer money is enough.  Plus, we don't have a lot of tax payer money right now with coronavirus.  The world's kind of broke frankly.  But, that is neither here nor there with my point really. 

From things I've heard, there is much depression on the reservations.  It's taken their life, their meaning for living from them.  It's like living in a cage and people are depressed and then alcoholism can come into play here.  

In California, the Indian Casinos are doing quite well, and it seems to be something the Native Americans want because it gives them a purpose; it gives them something to do; something to wake up for and be productive at.  

So, what I am saying is...how much money would a bit of tax payer money be?  Would it be enough to have a life?  This is really what Native Americans need; a purpose.  Maybe it's best to ask them what they need as if they can't make a life out of it, it isn't enough.

Here is just a snippet about one of Indian Casinos in California, though California has several.  They do quite well.  At first they were all Bingo only but they have slots now too.  There are Indian Casinos in other states as well.  

The Pechanga Resort & Casino is a Native American casino on the Pechanga Indian Reservation adjacent to the city of Temecula, California. Pechanga Resort & Casino is the largest casino in the state of California, with over 4,500 slot machines and approximately 200,000 sq ft (19,000 m2) of gaming space.[1][2]

Edited by FairreLilette
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13 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

So, what I am saying is...how much money would a bit of tax payer money be?  Would it be enough to have a life?  This is really what Native Americans need; a purpose.  Maybe it's best to ask them what they need as if they can't make a life out of it, it isn't enough.

I don't mean just throwing money at them, but rather giving money to programs or causes  (some  could be government sponsored) that could help them get on their feet and lead better lives. They need resources so they can, for example, receive an education or seek therapy to help overcome the trauma that was caused via decimating their culture. One such program I donate money to is Saint Joseph Indian School: https://www.stjo.org/ 

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55 minutes ago, Beth Macbain said:
1 hour ago, Luna Bliss said:

But I would be willing to pay a few dollars more in taxes to help these cultures that, still today, suffer from what we did to them in the past.

My family wasn't even here... My mother was British and my father's grandfather came over from Germany... but I absolutely wouldn't mind paying a couple bucks extra in taxes for reparations to both the ADOS community and the Native American community. Now I donate to organizations involved in those communities, but it sure would be grand if our government did the right thing and those organizations became unnecessary because we're actually taking care of ALL our people. 

A good point, yes, that even if your personal ancestors were not responsible for land-theft from Natives and enslavement of Blacks it is possible to understand why it can be difficult for abused peoples to climb out of their situation and lead successful lives, and so have sympathy and a desire to assist them.

Also, since you mentioned British ancestry...this discussion could be broadened to the effects of colonialism across the globe and how all countries engaged in colonialism benefitted from the abuse of the people they conquered -- this is where the greater wealth came from in countries engaged in colonialism (taking it from those we enslaved or stole from).

I have to point out too that even if someone is an immigrant who came to this country in more recent years they are benefitting from the wealth built on land-theft and enslavement via our institutions.

Edited by Luna Bliss
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For those not in the US or those who don't understand how slavery issues affect the US even today, this is an informative talk by Jeffery Robinson, American Civil Liberties Union Deputy Legal Director. He describes how the US was founded on white supremacy and white superiority and how it's ingrained in our culture even today, yet so much of the time we don't even notice it. He makes the case for telling the truth about our past, because those who control the narrative of our past control the present (for example, some are attempting to rewrite History by saying the Civil War was not about slavery).

I was shocked to discover just how many Confederate monuments there are...over 1500!  And many of them were constructed in later years, during specific periods when Whites couldn't deal with Blacks gaining more power in society, causing their racism to hear its ugly head. Basically, in the hearts and minds of many, the Civil War is still raging:

 

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52 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I don't mean just throwing money at them, but rather giving money to programs or causes  (some  could be government sponsored) that could help them get on their feet and lead better lives. They need resources so they can, for example, receive an education or seek therapy to help overcome the trauma that was caused via decimating their culture. One such program I donate money to is Saint Joseph Indian School: https://www.stjo.org/ 

Oh, I kind of did think you meant just throwing money at them but all that would be is just a pretty prison. 

As far as the Indian Casinos though, that is also a way to donate and have a chance to win and relax at a resort as well.

The Indian Casinos re-opened in California about a month ago, but just yesterday the governor said he is closing all the bars in California due to Covid-19.  However, anyone can go to an Indian Casino and not drink alcohol...so the Indian Casinos may still be open; I'm not sure at this time.  But, it's a more direct way to donate and have fun too, and it's way better than the lotteries which some of the money is supposed to go to support schools and programs, but I hear the lotteries fall short of their goal. 

Edit:  I may as not mince words...I hear the lottery officials are corrupt.  Schools ask where is the money?  Lottery official says "I don't know...".   Too much of this world is corrupt.    

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35 minutes ago, FairreLilette said:

As far as the Indian Casinos though, that is also a way to donate and have a chance to win and relax at a resort as well.

I don't know a lot about the Casino's run by Natives, but you have to be careful when evaluating the belief that Casinos benefit Native Americans to a great degree. I've run into more than one person who said Natives have no poverty because they have Casinos which provide immense wealth. Like everything, there's no simple answer and it one has to take into account each individual and each tribe to weigh the benefits:

The Myth Of Indian Casino Riches
https://indiancountrytoday.com/archive/the-myth-of-indian-casino-riches-3H8eP-wHX0Wz0H4WnQjwjA
~~~~~~~
For Native Americans, Tribal Casinos Help And Hurt
Helping Or Hurting? For Some Native Americans, Tribal-Casino Gambling Collides With Gambling Addiction
https://www.stlpublicradio.org/projects/fixed-odds/for-native-americans-tribal-casinos-help-and-hurt/

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2 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

Speaking about America and not your country, how separate are we from the past really? The wealth we have in America was built on the backs of those we stole land from (Natives), and those we enslaved (Blacks), decimating both of their cultures to varying degrees in the process. In other words, we grew as a wealthy nation because we abused them. And all this occurred not so long ago really.
Now I'm not saying vast amounts of wealth should be taken from those living today who had nothing to do with the abuse -- I certainly don't want my cozy little cottage I live in to be yanked from me. But I would be willing to pay a few dollars more in taxes to help these cultures that, still today, suffer from what we did to them in the past.

You mentioned helping those less fortunate in your community. How did they get that way? Barring major crises and deprivations in present circumstances, the deprivation is passed on through the generations via inadequate parenting. One generation is abused so severely (in America, say Native Americans), that their culture is decimated and they are not able to parent adequately, and so their children are not able to successfully parent the succeeding generations. And so here in the US we have rampant alcoholism on the reservations, and the wrecked, miserable, and wasted lives that accompany this disease.

I'm sure no one would deny you donating to any cause you wish. I suspect people would only take issue with being forced to do so.

As for how families fall into poverty, it's complicated. I wouldn't ascribe it to any one cause, but I would be cautious in calling it inadequate parenting. Poor people are not fools nor are they somehow morally damaged. Some of them just made unfortunate choices, or had unfortunate things happen to them through no fault of their own. I should say some of us, as I've had my days of living frugally too. My parents valued education, which is the best single tool for escaping poverty, imo. Teach a man to fish...

 

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32 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I don't know a lot about the Casino's run by Natives, but you have to be careful when evaluating the belief that Casinos benefit Native Americans to a great degree. I've run into more than one person who said Natives have no poverty because they have Casinos which provide immense wealth. Like everything, there's no simple answer and it one has to take into account each individual and each tribe to weigh the benefits:

The Myth Of Indian Casino Riches
https://indiancountrytoday.com/archive/the-myth-of-indian-casino-riches-3H8eP-wHX0Wz0H4WnQjwjA
~~~~~~~
For Native Americans, Tribal Casinos Help And Hurt
Helping Or Hurting? For Some Native Americans, Tribal-Casino Gambling Collides With Gambling Addiction
https://www.stlpublicradio.org/projects/fixed-odds/for-native-americans-tribal-casinos-help-and-hurt/

Oh, I don't think they have immense wealth.  If they did, the schools would be a lot better off.  I said it gives them something to do; a purpose, something to wake up to every morning and be productive at because it's better than the corrupt lottery officials.  The lottery falls far short of the money it is supposed to be allotting for schools.  And, when the lottery officials are asked 'where is the money for the schools', people get as an answer from the lottery officials which is an 'I don't know'.  

Of course gambling can be an addiction but so can alcohol but that doesn't mean I am for prohibition against alcohol or gambling because some may be addicted.  I am not addicted to gambling.  I usually win a few hundred dollars and then go buy antiques in the antique districts.  

But, going off topic.  You should listen to this speech by Charlie Chaplin at the end of the movie "The Great Dictator".   Did you ever hear of this movie, "The Great Dictator" written by Charlie Chaplin?  It is one incredible movie.  

The Great Dictator is a 1940 American political satire comedy-drama film written, directed, produced, scored by, and starring British comedian Charlie Chaplin, following the tradition of many of his other films. Having been the only Hollywood filmmaker to continue to make silent films well into the period of sound films, Chaplin made this his first true sound film.

Chaplin's film advanced a stirring condemnation of Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, fascism, antisemitism, and the Nazis. At the time of its first release, the United States was still formally at peace with Nazi Germany and neutral during what were the early days of World War II. Chaplin plays both leading roles: a ruthless fascist dictator and a persecuted Jewish barber.

The Great Dictator was popular with audiences, becoming Chaplin's most commercially successful film.[4] Modern critics have also praised it as a historically significant film and an important work of satire. In 1997, it was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[5] [6]The Great Dictator was nominated for five Academy Awards – Outstanding Production, Best Actor, Best Writing (Original Screenplay), Best Supporting Actor for Jack Oakie, and Best Music (Original Score).

In his 1964 autobiography, Chaplin stated that he could not have made the film if he had known about the true extent of the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps at that time.[7]

Edited by FairreLilette
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3 hours ago, Beth Macbain said:

My family wasn't even here... My mother was British and my father's grandfather came over from Germany... but I absolutely wouldn't mind paying a couple bucks extra in taxes for reparations to both the ADOS community and the Native American community. Now I donate to organizations involved in those communities, but it sure would be grand if our government did the right thing and those organizations became unnecessary because we're actually taking care of ALL our people. 

Part of my family was here before the Civil War, part came in after it. Some of them may have owned slaves, I'm sure most didn't. But I don't believe that's relevant. As Americans we live in a country largely built on the back of hundreds of years of slave labor. Followed by another hundred years of de facto slavery and segregation, unequal justice and unequal opportunity. That's a debt we all owe regardless of when our ancestors came here, because it didn't stop in 1865, or 1965. It's a debt we can never completely repay, but we have an obligation as a nation to do everything we can.

Edited by Lyssa Greymoon
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6 hours ago, FairreLilette said:

This is so true Ceka all of what you said about generations and parents and each generation getting better as I read through your posts.  

And, it is better for Blacks and other POC and women too.  But, yes, we know there is still work to be done.   I am so grateful to have lived in multi-ethnic communities instead of how my grand-parents had to live in Polish town only.  I wouldn't want us all divided up like that and be forced to live in just one part of town, Polish town, and pushed into there by the Police.   

It's exciting today as I write this that Joe Biden wants to pick a Black female Vice Presidential running mate.  Mr. Biden has his eye on several female Black Senators from whom he wants to choose from.   He's known them awhile.  He just doesn't know which one he wants to pick yet as all are worthy to him.  

I mean this is exciting, the first Black and female Vice President.  And, take into account, Joe Biden is old and not in optimum health, so what would that leave.  Why, it would leave the first Black female President of the United States.  I don't mean to just say Joe Biden is old because Donald Trump is old too.  They both have heart conditions.  But, still this is incredible news.  Joe Biden will not officially announce his Vice Presidential nominee until August the article said, but he has his eye on a few female Black senators and these are the ones he is going to pick from.    

I'm not a fan of Joe Biden really.. He's so old school that he doesn't even realize that he comes off sounding like at first he's picking a token woman, and now a token black woman vice president.

That's the kind of politicians we need to get rid of.. The career politicians that will say whatever it takes. I don't trust any of them anyways, but for me some are just the cream of the crop..

He's one, McCain was one,Romney, Trump, Hillary even though I think she is done now...I could be here all day just running off the names..

Look, We've got businesses closing down again, all states but two back on the rise of infections, the death toll will be increasing in a couple weeks to a month..

What's congress doing? Taking a vacation on the 3rd and not coming back until the 20th, because they either don't care or don't think the virus is a problem anymore..

The reason they would think this way is, because they are so high up in their own heads that they've become out of touch.

Most times when a politician speaks, my tummy turns a little..

I don't trust any of them.

 

ETA:I'm sorry for sounding harsh..it's not at you but at politicians in general.. These guys are taking a vacation right in the middle of a crisis, when unemployment stimulus is going to run out and cut 20 million people down to crumbs, which will more than likely cause more unemployment of about 5 million..

All because they aren't taking it serious now.. The economy is going to hit us all hard very soon if they don't get off their butts and act..

Edited by Ceka Cianci
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Here's an interesting critique of "White Fragility" - I find the author a loathsome creature on many topics but here he has a point. https://taibbi.substack.com/p/on-white-fragility

Here's a podcast (I think worth paying for) that interviews a woman who went through a year-long training with the author of "White Fragility" and found it lacking. https://www.patreon.com/posts/early-access-f-38424843

And there's more if you look. You can address the very real issues of racism without going down this sectarian rabbit hole.

Here is an important article for example to understand the history:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/06/22/the-history-of-the-riot-report

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58 minutes ago, Ceka Cianci said:

I'm not a fan of Joe Biden really.. He's so old school that he doesn't even realize that he comes off sounding like at first he's picking a token woman, and now a token black woman vice president.

That's the kind of politicians we need to get rid of.. The career politicians that will say whatever it takes. I don't trust any of them anyways, but for me some are just the cream of the crop..

I know it does partly sound that way but he knows the Senator's personally and he just could not decide.  It's several female Black Senator's he's considering that unfortunately it does come off sounding a bit odd, but we are in odd times and he's under pressure to let people know who his Vice Presidential candidate will be.  He said he will announce his decision in August.  The thing to remember with president's it's a whole team working behind the scenes together but they have to come through for us.   I'm going to remain at least a bit hopeful we will make it through this.  But, I'm on edge because of Covid-19 and it's aftermath too.  

 

58 minutes ago, Ceka Cianci said:

What's congress doing? Taking a vacation on the 3rd and not coming back until the 20th, because they either don't care or don't think the virus is a problem anymore.

I know.  I know.  I know.  The bars were closed in California yesterday by our state's Governor.   My niece is a bartender with a 1-year-old baby.  I'm not even sure if my niece has to file for unemployment again and WAIT to get unemployment again, or what?  

I am angry at Congress for taking this extended break.  We need answers soon; very soon.  

The thing is, a Black female Vice President chair could help with issues that need addressing now as we go forward into 2021, but I also know it's one very tough economic situation with Covid-19 and jobs right now.   It's not going to be any easy time, not only for America, but for the world.  We need to hear from Congress soon.  

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12 hours ago, Akane Nacht said:

Mine, yes. My great-great-great grandfather's? Nope. I see no point in dwelling on things long done by people I never knew.

so you would be aggrieved if the property was yours. But not if the property was your great-great-great-grandfathers ?

you understand why people, including yourself, are aggrieved when this happens

lets look at this generationally. At what point do we cut off restitution (or compensation) of property taken by the State since the establishment of the State. We are not talking about things that happened before this establishment. Just things that have happened since


a generational posit

suppose the property was a ring, an heirloom, which had been passed down from mother to daughter in your family for as long as anyone can remember. Then one day your grandmother turns up not happy. The ring has been taken by an agent of the State for no reason other than that they could, so they took it

you say what to your grandmother, your mother, your daughter and your granddaughter ?

do you say: Oh! well. Nevermind. It wasn't my ring. Grandma, you, Mum, my daughter and my granddaughter need to get over yourselves ?

then as time goes by your grandmother and mother die. You are now the oldest generation in the family. Your great granddaughter (of the now 6th generation since the ring was taken) says to you: Nana I know where the ring is. I am going to try and get it back

do you say: Child the ring is not yours, it was my grandmothers ?

child then says: It would have been mine had the State not taken it. I am going to try and get it back so I can give it to my daughter one day (the 7th generation). What do you say to this ?

do you just repeat yourself: Child let it go. The ring is not yours to give to your daughter - my great great granddaughter

or do you say: Child is all ancient history now, forget about it and get over yourself ?

a thing. 6 generations is 120 years. 7 generations will be 140 years. Is a long time. However is not ancient history. The ring was taken in living memory. Your living memory

your great granddaughter to aid her efforts in getting the ring back, asks you to attest in an affidavit that the ring was taken from your grandmother. What do you say to her ?

do you say: I am not going to attest to this. Let it go ?

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NY Times has found 70 cases of people dying at the hands of police after saying "I Can't Breath":

https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Three-Words-70-Cases-The-Tragic-History-of-I-15374879.php

Original article:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/28/us/i-cant-breathe-police-arrest.html

(It's not behind their paywall for me, but it might be for you, so I kept the SF gate link also).

 

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1 hour ago, Mollymews said:

a generational posit

Good example.

Here's another generational one:

 

Your G-g-g-g-g-g-g-grandfather (throw in a few more g's maybe) was a biblical scholar fluent in Aramaic, Ge'ez, Arabic, and Swahili. He owned the same plot of land that his family had held for 5 centuries, was moderately wealthy, and had been to Axum, Mecca and Timbuktu in his travels. He knew the Torah, the Bible, AND the Quran. One day raiders came to town and sacked the 700 year old village he lived in, stripped him naked and put him in chains in the hold of a ship. On the journey he heard one of his captors singing an in-work version song we all know as "Amazing Grace" - but English was one language he did not know.

He lands in a new land where the first thing he sees getting off the boat is local young boys - tweens, assembled at the dock where they "assault" the women from his town as a man holds up a book and chants what has the rhythm of a prayer (that BTW... is how slaves that came into Boston before the North abolished slavery were greeted). He and the others are too weak from the journey to even object.

He is sold and ends up on a plantations somewhere where as I type this a white couple is planning their wedding because it's such a 'quaint and charming' place...

3-5 generations later, his descendant is convinced he comes from a jungle savage that didn't even have language before being brought there, but still knows he is being treated unjustly and has the lash-mark scars on his back to prove it. He is a man who has had to sit there and watch as the white plantation workers have "assaulted" both his wife and his daughter in front of him. For laughs, they castrate one of his sons and made bets on how long it would take the young boy to die bleeding out. They made another slave eat the cut away body part (that DOES come from another English colony, New Zealand; and I don't doubt also ours because parts of that form of brutality WAS common during Jim Crow).

One day soldiers arrive and tell him he is a free man after burning down the plantation house and shooting the elderly slavemaster. But a few years later he finds he has no money and nowhere he can go and the new laws make it so he cannot afford to buy a horse, buy passage on a train or boat, or find work anywhere but on a sharecropping farm just a few yards away from the house he lived in as a slave...

A generation later the husband of his daughter is lynched when he tries to vote... he was a man who still believed his ancestors were jungle savages, but he thought himself now a civilized free man, he was told he was a citizen, so he died trying to prove it.

The daughter has 3 children - 2 by her son and one by the son of the former slavemaster who "assaulted" her. She sells the last son to some Cherokee - that is MY Ancestor (but the handover happened in the decades BEFORE the end of slavery not after, as my ancestor walked the trail of tears and later "vanished into" southern white culture - this fact of that person being African and NOT Cherokee was only discovered a decade ago).

A half century of sharecropping goes by and two brothers exist. One stays on the sharecropper farm, the other takes a chance and moves to a town called Tulsa - where he opens up a general store and gets moderately wealthy until the day before he's set to call his brother out and get him a job there; a white mob comes into town and kills EVERYONE...

Another half century of sharecropping goes by... That child sold to Cherokee now has a white descendant who is in the local chapter of the Klan up in the Appalachian mountains - he may or may not have killed, he has no idea he has spent many years terrorizing people he should see as family... but karma will catch up with his descendants in a few decades because them hillbillies is moving to California right soon and they're gonna get infected with pot smoking liberals, Mexicans, Peruvians who actually DO come from the jungle, Chinese, and even 'gays'... oops...

But back to the black side of the family... WWII comes and the government needs people to rebuild the navy out in California. Our man of this generation and a whole lot of other local black folk move out to Oakland California. He makes good money making ships, even manages to buy a house out by the waterfront. Things are looking up. The Klan is still over in Berkeley but they don't lynch folks out here (that I know of...). The 1950s arrive though and the liberals in San Francisco see all these black families owning land in West Oakland... and are frightened by 'children running in the streets and people just hanging out on porches and talking to each other like savages that can't manage their own affairs'...

So they use eminent domain to take his home and they 'move him on up to the west wide' in a deluxe apartment called the Oakland Projects... Where his house once stood, the 880 freeway now rests. On the other side of the freeway white land developers put up hotels and office parks. On his side there are strangely very few on-ramps and no businesses. Not even a grocery store. The liberals call this "Urban Renewal" - a plan to "help" minorities by managing their affairs for them. Something folks out on the "rez" in the country would like to respond back about also...

He loses his job because he can't get to work without getting arrested. His son never has a job - joins the Black Panthers in the 60s and gets shot by the FBI during a peaceful assembly to hand out food to the poor after being seen a week earlier standing around in a suit and tie and rifle in a 'display of second amendment rights'. But before he dies, he did at least learn the truth of where his ancestors came from.

His grandson is born in the projects. This young lad grows up believing his people used to be jungle savages because his father was killed before passing on the truth, and now live in the urban jungle. He joins a gang and gets mowed down by the police at the age of 17 with 2 kids already born...

 

It's one of those kids that think's she's the first person in the line to ever go to college - because she doesn't even know who her ancestor in Africa was - and joins BLM... and gets to hear people asking her why does she thinks her and her people are owned anything...

 

Now maybe they didn't have it the best of all the descendants, Maybe some of them even made it into the middle class and didn't have their homes taken away... I use to work for a black family of doctors in the 1980s, and I know a lot of folk did make it up earlier... but they also sure didn't have it the worst either...

- and everything above has happened to somebody... and a whole lot more too boot. That family didn't sharecrop for a whole century by choice.

 

 

But let's look at our modern day member of that family...

- She's thinks she's the first success. But she does finally know the history of the people she came from - just not her part in it.

- no one in her family has anything to give her in the way of support. There is no 'legacy admission to Harvard' for her. There is no internship at A, B & C Partners at Law. There is no person to help her get into that 'young leaders study abroad' program'... none of those many things... If she loses a job, she has absolutely no support to help her through a rough patch...

- the average white family has some or all of these things. No not the free pass into Harvard, but they do have connections, peers, internship paths, even the ability to put a down-on-your-luck family member on the couch for a bit through a rough patch.

- She lacks these things because everytime her family was about to start saving up or getting connected - they had it taken away.

 

This is the tame and extremely abridged version. When folks tell you they have been under 4-500 years of brutality and injustice... listen.

 

Edited by Pussycat Catnap
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