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L.E.D or L.C.D Monitor.


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Hi,

I am wanting to upgrade my monitor to a 32", I use SL a lot, and general pc use, I find they now make LED as well as LCD, so confused as to which to go for, any help would be much appreciated, thank you in advance.

Fyre.

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pretty much all flat and curved screens are LED LCD (liquid crystal displays). The LED part refers to the backlighting  (light emitting diode)

i have a Samsung C27F591 27 inch Curved LED Monitor (2560x1440) plugged into my Nvdia 1050Ti graphics card which goes great

 

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Unless you're talking about spending a lot currently, it makes less difference than you might expect. True LED displays ("Organic LED" or OLED) are still very costly. They're mostly TV-sized panels (like 55") but there now are a few desktop-sized (e.g., one from Asus).

Otherwise an "LED" screen refers to the backlighting, as @Mollymews said. The older alternative backlighting technology, CCFL, is slightly cheaper, uses slightly more power and therefore generates slightly more heat, but for use at home it really makes little difference, and LED panels are slowly taking over the market.

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LCDs are on the way out Samsung announced it will stop making them this year. (Ref)

There are numerous reviews of the various technologies online. (Google)

There are two things I consider important, speed or image change and contrast or how black is the black.

Personal preference and your video card determine what resolution you run. 1920×1024 is sort of the common size for office work. I suspect that would be low for a 32" screen giving you a bit of a fuzzy image. The 3840×2160 screens would be better. 

Refresh rates are a matter of speed, how quickly they can change to a new image without blurring. The speed can be advertised as refresh rate in Hz or in milliseconds for response time. They aren't the same thing but close enough. Generally faster is better. With Hz that means higher numbers and with Response Time lower numbers. Rates of the typical monitors are 60hz, way good enough for SL. The 120 and 140 are common on higher end monitors. The top of the line seem to be the 240hz monitors. The faster rates allow use of some 3D tech. But 240... I am not sure what advantage it provides over 120hz.

In general you want to do your homework to decide what you want based on tech then look at the monitors in-store you think may be your choice and decide what looks good to you.

 

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11 hours ago, Lillith Hapmouche said:

Respect to that 1050 TI powering a WQHD screen...

 

10 hours ago, Nalates Urriah said:

In general you want to do your homework to decide what you want based on tech then look at the monitors in-store you think may be your choice and decide what looks good to you.

i agree. Is always best when we can see what we are buying before we buy it, and talk to knowledgeable expert people beforehand also

my story

my computer is nearly 10 years old now. I got it put together for me at a custom build shop. At the time it cost me about $NZ150 more than if I had bought something similar off the shelf or tried to put it together myself out of parts.  I was happy to pay the extra for the expert advice, what parts work best with what, within the budget I had

i have never had any trouble with my computer in all this time, other than setting up drivers again whenever Microsoft Update sticks in stuff which go wonky sometimes. I did have to tho update my network card driver myself as well one time

when I saw the Samsung monitor on another person's computer I rang the builder shop and said I was thinking about buying the Samsung monitor, made an appointment and took my box in with me. Where I talked about it all with the shop technicians

because I have a ASUS P8B75-M motherboard, they recommended the ASUS Geforce GTX 1050Ti. They said that if I go higher than 1050Ti, higher like 1060 and up, then is going to struggle to work well with the motherboard I have, and there is also not going to be enough power from my power supply to avoid struggles

so I went with the builder shop recommendation. Got the Asus 1050Ti, the Samsung monitor and HDMI cable from them, which they installed. Turned off the HDMI sound driver, continue to use my normal sound speaker system. Set it to 2560x1440 at 75Hz and happy as

the cool thing was when I rang them, the shop ordered in the Samsung. So it was there when I came for my appointment. I was never under any obligation to buy it which they stressed. If I don't buy it and go with something else then they will have no trouble selling it to another customer. Which was really good of them to do and say. Is this kind of forethought that I really like about people I buy stuff from

just a FYI on Second Life and FPS

my 1050Ti computer runs SL at a maximum of 104FPS. I found this out by going to Advanced and Develop menus and turning off all the rendering, so just a blank viewport. 104FPS and thats it

for everyday use I cap my FPS refresh rate to 75 so not to waste cycles (wear and tear), Higher graphic card cycles which I can't see on my screen with my own eyes. Not that it ever gets to 75 ordinarily except when I am on my sky platform by myself

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