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*****ing *****ed up mother *****ers are *****ing the whole *****ing *****ed up ****sucking *****head *****s. And then some.

Cutting in with a rando side comment because I haven’t kept up - I’m tired of all the conspiracy theories behind it, and all the Americans on my feeds (note: I am also an American) pointing fingers at

You are out over your skis here Saucey. Babies with jaundice receive UV/Blue phototherapy because exposing blood to UV aids oxidation of the toxic bilirubin in it. A significant volume of blood reache

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The good news is, our positivity rate is down.. In early august for the U.S. it peaked at 8.5% after it started to go back up and has been going down ever since..

Our current positivity rate is at 4.8% which is getting close to where  we were when the country was shut down.

Which in mid April we had reached our highest positivity rate of 21.8% with doing just over 130k tests per day, which was around the time they shut everything down..

Then went down to 4.2% in late June early July doing around half the testing we are now..

it was at like 300k to 400k+ testing per day at 4.2%, where at the current 4.8% it is 800k to almost a million tests per day..

When we see jumps from day to day from 20k positive to 40k positive, it's because more tests were done that day than the lower positive count..

The news will say one day, we are at a current 44k positive cases ,where the day before ,they didn't say anything about the 22k..

The main thing is,we want to be below a 5% positivity rate, which shows a slowing of the spread..

We've been below 5% positivity rate for close to two weeks now and moving downward..

This is a good thing.

 

The real test will be, when the cooler months come into play and windows and doors are closed up and work places and places of business and so on, where air is getting recirculated, play a much bigger factor than in the warmer months..

Edited by Ceka Cianci
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As the WHO warns of a rise in coronavirus fatalities across Europe from October, The Telegraph's Theodora Louloudis and Global Health Security Correspondent, Sarah Newey discuss how this could play out in Britain, and whether younger sufferers and breakthroughs in treatments are enough to stop a deadly second wave.

 

(Disclaimer: Because i am not interested to be part of the usual "*****publicans vs democraps" or other silly stuff that take place in the forums, in case you get no reply it means i just ignore some of you who are obsessed with their political party views and other nonsense that have absolutely NO VALUE for me due to NOT living in your country. Thank you.)

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4 hours ago, Nick0678 said:

(Disclaimer: Because i am not interested to be part of the usual "*****publicans vs democraps" or other silly stuff that take place in the forums, in case you get no reply it means i just ignore some of you who are obsessed with their political party views and other nonsense that have absolutely NO VALUE for me due to NOT living in your country. Thank you.)

Nice. Nothing like an aggressive preemptive peeing on folks. Ya know, just ignoring people without the BS disclaimer works, too. Concept.

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45 minutes ago, Seicher Rae said:

Oh my bleeping gawd. Really? This hasn't been peer reviewed, so hopefully there's a glitch (but I doubt it).

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2020/09/23/houston-coronavirus-mutations/?arc404=true

Who knew giving a highly contagious virus easy access to a virtually unlimited supply of willing hosts was a bad idea?

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A good friend of mine just suffered the loss of a close relative to COVID. The woman who died also has a daughter in the hospital with COVID and *she* isn't doing well either. Being a virtual friend sometimes sucks, because a virtual hug just doesn't compete with a 3D one.  I'm copy/pasting this from the NYTimes for anyone else who may be struggling with "what the heck do I even say?"

What Should You Say When Someone You Know Is Grieving?

Covid-19 deaths are being announced everywhere. Recognize the loss.

By Jocelyn M. DeGroot

Dr. DeGroot is an associate professor of applied communication studies at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

  • May 28, 2020
  • Over 100,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus, and thanks to social media, many of us who aren’t personally in mourning are digitally connected to someone who is. Especially for people in the hardest-hit areas, death announcements in Facebook statuses, Instagram posts and tweets seem more frequent than they’ve ever been.

    While social-distancing requirements have limited funerals and burials, sharing condolences online is as easy as ever — or at least it should be. But I worry that people will keep scrolling and fail to reach out — or worse, make hurtful comments — because they are simply overwhelmed by the scale of loss.

    Because I’ve studied grief for nearly 15 years, I’m often asked what to say to a person whose loved one has died, and my response is always the same: Recognize the loss. And let the person have their grief.

    The pandemic has made that advice even more salient.

    But what if the grieving person is someone who has appeared in your feed for years but you haven’t talked with since high school? What if he or she is just a casual acquaintance or a former co-worker? What if you exchange likes on each other’s posts but haven’t met in person?

    I repeat: Recognize the loss. And let the person have his or her grief.

    When you see the bad news, don’t delay, deliberate or draft and redraft responses you’ll never send. “I’m sorry for your loss” or “I’m thinking of you” are perfectly good messages. I always advise sharing a favorite memory of the deceased, but if you don’t have one, it is fine to say, “I didn’t know your loved one personally, but I wanted to let you know I’m thinking about your family.”

    If you’re thinking friends and family members who are closer to the mourning person will handle the comforting words, don’t be so sure.

    The writer Nicole Chung, who recently lost her mother, said in a tweet, “One thing I’d almost forgotten from grieving my dad: you can suffer an enormous loss and hear almost nothing from people you thought you were close to, while near-strangers come out of the woodwork and send you the most life-giving messages.”

    You could be one of those near-strangers.

    With the absence of physical contact and proximity being limited to six-foot distances, grieving people will miss out on the important psychological aspects of touch and physical presence, exacerbating the grieving process. Many will be at home alone. So your words matter more than ever.

    Preliminary findings from a study I conducted with Dr. Heather Carmack have revealed that the statements most appreciated by people after the death of a loved one are those that acknowledge the person’s grief or offer tangible help: I’m sorry for your loss; My condolences on the death of …; Deepest sympathies; Praying for you and your family (if they are religious).

    Our participants also welcomed hearing memories of their loved ones. You can share these even if your recollections come from stories shared on Twitter or photos you’ve seen in your social feeds over the years.

    When you navigate to the comments or replies to leave a message, you might see that others had the same idea and posted something similar to what you planned to say. That’s OK. Your words don’t need to be unique. I’ve learned that people often scroll through social media comments not to glean unique insights but simply to remind themselves that people support them — so the specific message is less important than the fact that the message is there.

    But please remember not to make the loss about you. I’ve observed that at times, people who only tangentially know the deceased post extensive messages about the death, tagging close family members. Researchers have called this behavior “grief-lite” or “grief porn,” and it’s a practice born in the social media age. I call it emotional rubbernecking, and you should avoid it.

    Our study’s preliminary findings indicated that the most damaging messages to bereaved people were those that marginalized the death in some way, causing the grief to become disenfranchised. Trite sayings such as “Only the good die young” or “God must have needed another angel” are decidedly not helpful. Admit that the death was terrible, the current circumstances are terrible, and if you don’t know what to say … say that.

    Comments like “At least she lived a full life,” “I know how you feel,” “You still have your husband” are not supportive. Instead, these comments invalidate the person’s grief.

    Remember that people are fearful that others will forget their deceased loved ones. You can make sure that’s not true, even as the number of people lost recently is so great. Make a comment now. Send a message in a month. Send another in six months. And when the pandemic is over, when the food photos and political debates remain but the tragic announcements are less frequent, reach out, recognize the loss and let the person have his or her grief, yet again.

 

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I thought it couldn't get any worse, but Trump now has coronavirus (confirmed) and nuclear command planes are out to protect against foreign adversaries (the latter not officially confirmed).

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10 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I thought it couldn't get any worse, but Trump now has coronavirus (confirmed) and nuclear command planes are out to protect against foreign adversaries (the latter not officially confirmed).

We see more cause for joy than despair. Everything is perfect, and is as the universe intends.

Edited by Chroma Starlight
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Just now, Chroma Starlight said:
10 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I thought it couldn't get any worse, but Trump now has coronavirus (confirmed) and nuclear command planes are out to protect against foreign adversaries (the latter not officially confirmed).

We see more cause for joy than despair.

Shhh...I'm trying to be nice...lol

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I hope Trump didn't give Covid to Biden at the recent debate. I can't imagine how this would all be sorted out if both of them die -- what kind of turmoil this would throw the US into...or I guess I should say 'increased turmoil'.

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On 9/29/2020 at 5:54 PM, Seicher Rae said:

A good friend of mine just suffered the loss of a close relative to COVID. The woman who died also has a daughter in the hospital with COVID and *she* isn't doing well either. Being a virtual friend sometimes sucks, because a virtual hug just doesn't compete with a 3D one.  I'm copy/pasting this from the NYTimes for anyone else who may be struggling with "what the heck do I even say?"

What Should You Say When Someone You Know Is Grieving?

Covid-19 deaths are being announced everywhere. Recognize the loss.

By Jocelyn M. DeGroot

Dr. DeGroot is an associate professor of applied communication studies at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

  • May 28, 2020
  • Over 100,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus, and thanks to social media, many of us who aren’t personally in mourning are digitally connected to someone who is. Especially for people in the hardest-hit areas, death announcements in Facebook statuses, Instagram posts and tweets seem more frequent than they’ve ever been.

    While social-distancing requirements have limited funerals and burials, sharing condolences online is as easy as ever — or at least it should be. But I worry that people will keep scrolling and fail to reach out — or worse, make hurtful comments — because they are simply overwhelmed by the scale of loss.

    Because I’ve studied grief for nearly 15 years, I’m often asked what to say to a person whose loved one has died, and my response is always the same: Recognize the loss. And let the person have their grief.

    The pandemic has made that advice even more salient.

    But what if the grieving person is someone who has appeared in your feed for years but you haven’t talked with since high school? What if he or she is just a casual acquaintance or a former co-worker? What if you exchange likes on each other’s posts but haven’t met in person?

    I repeat: Recognize the loss. And let the person have his or her grief.

    When you see the bad news, don’t delay, deliberate or draft and redraft responses you’ll never send. “I’m sorry for your loss” or “I’m thinking of you” are perfectly good messages. I always advise sharing a favorite memory of the deceased, but if you don’t have one, it is fine to say, “I didn’t know your loved one personally, but I wanted to let you know I’m thinking about your family.”

    If you’re thinking friends and family members who are closer to the mourning person will handle the comforting words, don’t be so sure.

    The writer Nicole Chung, who recently lost her mother, said in a tweet, “One thing I’d almost forgotten from grieving my dad: you can suffer an enormous loss and hear almost nothing from people you thought you were close to, while near-strangers come out of the woodwork and send you the most life-giving messages.”

    You could be one of those near-strangers.

    With the absence of physical contact and proximity being limited to six-foot distances, grieving people will miss out on the important psychological aspects of touch and physical presence, exacerbating the grieving process. Many will be at home alone. So your words matter more than ever.

    Preliminary findings from a study I conducted with Dr. Heather Carmack have revealed that the statements most appreciated by people after the death of a loved one are those that acknowledge the person’s grief or offer tangible help: I’m sorry for your loss; My condolences on the death of …; Deepest sympathies; Praying for you and your family (if they are religious).

    Our participants also welcomed hearing memories of their loved ones. You can share these even if your recollections come from stories shared on Twitter or photos you’ve seen in your social feeds over the years.

    When you navigate to the comments or replies to leave a message, you might see that others had the same idea and posted something similar to what you planned to say. That’s OK. Your words don’t need to be unique. I’ve learned that people often scroll through social media comments not to glean unique insights but simply to remind themselves that people support them — so the specific message is less important than the fact that the message is there.

    But please remember not to make the loss about you. I’ve observed that at times, people who only tangentially know the deceased post extensive messages about the death, tagging close family members. Researchers have called this behavior “grief-lite” or “grief porn,” and it’s a practice born in the social media age. I call it emotional rubbernecking, and you should avoid it.

    Our study’s preliminary findings indicated that the most damaging messages to bereaved people were those that marginalized the death in some way, causing the grief to become disenfranchised. Trite sayings such as “Only the good die young” or “God must have needed another angel” are decidedly not helpful. Admit that the death was terrible, the current circumstances are terrible, and if you don’t know what to say … say that.

    Comments like “At least she lived a full life,” “I know how you feel,” “You still have your husband” are not supportive. Instead, these comments invalidate the person’s grief.

    Remember that people are fearful that others will forget their deceased loved ones. You can make sure that’s not true, even as the number of people lost recently is so great. Make a comment now. Send a message in a month. Send another in six months. And when the pandemic is over, when the food photos and political debates remain but the tragic announcements are less frequent, reach out, recognize the loss and let the person have his or her grief, yet again.

 

I've heard a few people say this over the years when referring to the loss of a loved one: "it never gets better, we just get used to it". I have found it to be very true from personal experience, so I'm passing it along.

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So now our President and First Lady has tested positive and the ghouls circle. Can't say I'm surprised, it was expected. You know all this talk about karma...wishing ill upon anyone is also bad karma and bad juju even if you think they deserve it. 

If karma handed out diseases to everyone who 'deserved' it there would barely be any humans left on the planet.  Regardless of where you stand politically, try to be better than that.  I wish illness upon no one.

Also, I had an uncle who spent the better part of August in hospital recovering from COVID. He had  the version that severely affected his lungs. Never smoked a day in his life or had any sort of breathing issue. And although he is now out and has recovered it has lingering effects.  It's an awful disease, to put it lightly.

Edited by Gage Wirefly
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13 minutes ago, Bagnu said:

I've heard a few people say this over the years when referring to the loss of a loved one: "it never gets better, we just get used to it". I have found it to be very true from personal experience, so I'm passing it along.

I have erased a couple of friends out of my life for constantly telling me it will get better.  

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9 minutes ago, Gage Wirefly said:

So now our President and First Lady has tested positive and the ghouls circle. Can't say I'm surprised, it was expected. You know all this talk about karma...wishing ill upon anyone is also bad karma and bad juju even if you think they deserve it. 

If karma handed out diseases to everyone who 'deserved' it there would barely be any humans left on the planet.  Regardless of where you stand politically, try to be better than that. 

You're talking about a conspiracy to wage war against the free that has done more damage to the human condition on Earth than any other in living memory. They cursed people's lives to misery, madness, destitution, and they sowed fear and delusion and then used it to subvert the people in whom it took root to attack the selfsame things that they value most in such great acts of ironic spiritual desecration that the darkness seems to savor so. This goes beyond darkness and perversity, beyond exploitation and depravity. It's a degradation of all the world, roiling clouds of war that obscure the light and impair sight.

You can sit there in your madness and rage against the light for piercing the darkness you've come to identify with, but in the end the world will become illuminated with lights one-thousand times brighter than mankind has witnessed in at least two millennia.

Edited by Chroma Starlight
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2 minutes ago, Chroma Starlight said:

You're talking about a conspiracy to wage war against the free that has done more damage to the human condition on Earth than any other in living memory. They cursed people's lives to misery, madness, destitution, and used people's own delusions to attack the things they value most. This goes beyond darkness and perversity, beyond exploitation and depravity. It's a degradation of all the world, roiling clouds of war that obscure the light and impair sight.

You can sit there in your madness and rage against the light for piercing the darkness you've come to identify with, but in the end the world will become illuminated with lights one-thousand times brighter than mankind has witnessed in at least two millennia.

Right, you're expressing joy but I'm the one in darkness.  Girl bye.

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It's a week since the courier picked up my 14 year son's Covid tests after he was randomly picked to do one for Imperial College London's survey.  Haven't heard a word back from them.  I presume its negative and they would have been in touch if it was positive.  🤔

 

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1 hour ago, Luna Bliss said:

I hope Trump didn't give Covid to Biden at the recent debate. I can't imagine how this would all be sorted out if both of them die -- what kind of turmoil this would throw the US into...or I guess I should say 'increased turmoil'.

I was listening to some reports and they were saying that Trump and Pence and a lot of the people around them get tested everyday.. That it's a good chance he just caught it in the last few days..

The debate was a few days ago..

Maybe as much talking as Chris Wallace was doing, he gave it to the both of them..Test Chris Wallace!!

hehehe

There had to be a vortex spinning in the middle of the stage with all the hot air those three were blowing around..

Just all three inhaling each others mouth pharts as each one just blew and blew.. You just knew someone was gonna catch something..

 

Edited by Ceka Cianci
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